What are your favourite FACTUAL books about Richard and/or his times? #poll


Hilary Jones
 

I've allowed room for five answers but you can add more! When you've chosen can you head to the Discussion Area and tell us why? This is the first of a number of polls which we hope will enable everyone to join in. We'll release the list, in order of popularity, in week beginning 18 November on the Home Page of our new website https://www.richardiii.org.uk/forum.php- more about that later.
Remember, it doesn't have to be a biography of Richard, it can be about any aspect of his life, his contemporaries, or fifteenth century life in general
(fingers crossed it all works) H

Mine are below in no particular order.

Thank you for voting.



Hilary Jones
 

Folks ignore. It didn't work in the way I thought. So - you have to send your suggestions, I list them all and we put them out to a popularity poll.  Still learning.
So send me your individual lists in the next week. A million apologies. H

On Sunday, 10 November 2019, 10:54:36 GMT, Hilary Jones via Groups.Io <hjnatdat@...> wrote:


A new poll has been created:

I've allowed room for five answers but you can add more! When you've chosen can you head to the Discussion Area and tell us why? This is the first of a number of polls which we hope will enable everyone to join in. We'll release the list, in order of popularity, in week beginning 18 November on the Home Page of our new website https://www.richardiii.org.uk/forum.php- more about that later.
Remember, it doesn't have to be a biography of Richard, it can be about any aspect of his life, his contemporaries, or fifteenth century life in general
(fingers crossed it all works) H

Mine are below in no particular order.

1. Richard III The Maligned King Annette Carson
2. Eleanor The Secret Queen John Ashdown-Hill
3. Edward IV Charles Ross
4. False, Fleeting, Perjur'd Clarence Michael Hicks
5. York House Books 1461-1490
6. The Merchant Class of Medieval London Sylvia Thrupp

Vote Now


Bale PAUL
 

Hicks and Ross ware not even in my top thirty!
I'd have to add Paul Murray Kendall's Richard the Third, still the best biography of Richard because it is not only incredibly well researched but also beautifully written. And the author really likes Richard! I also add his The Yorkist Age.
David Santiuste's Edward IV and the Wars of the Roses.
Michael K Jones Bosworth 1485 .
and with s few reservations David Hipshon's Richard III and the Death of Chivalry.


Hilary Jones
 

Thanks Paul, they're going on the list! As you can see I thought I'd be controversial :) Now I haven't heard of Santiuste's Edward IV so I'm learning already. Jones's Bosworth is indeed another favourite of mine. So sad that, Kendall apart, there is no really good Richard biography. H

On Sunday, 10 November 2019, 12:50:19 GMT, Bale PAUL <bale.paul-trevor@...> wrote:


Hicks and Ross ware not even in my top thirty!
I'd have to add Paul Murray Kendall's Richard the Third, still the best biography of Richard because it is not only incredibly well researched but also beautifully written. And the author really likes Richard! I also add his The Yorkist Age.
David Santiuste's Edward IV and the Wars of the Roses.
Michael K Jones Bosworth 1485 .
and with s few reservations David Hipshon's Richard III and the Death of Chivalry.


Bale PAUL
 

I know David Santuiste and his book is very good. Yes, so many biographies of Richard don’t do their research well. 
Hipshon wrote one which was going really well until 1483 when he ran out of energy and reverted to the tradition. Very disappointing.
Its like they get lazy.
Bit like actors playing Richard in the Henry VI/Richard III cycle. I’ve seen more than one do a great job up until they get to him being the main character, and they seem to be overwhelmed.
That’s why Robert Sheehan was so good, growing with the character then exploding with energy, sexuality, and charisma when he became the main man! 
Bale Paul Trevor




On 10 Nov 2019, at 13:58, Hilary Jones via Groups.Io <hjnatdat@...> wrote:

Thanks Paul, they're going on the list! As you can see I thought I'd be controversial :) Now I haven't heard of Santiuste's Edward IV so I'm learning already. Jones's Bosworth is indeed another favourite of mine. So sad that, Kendall apart, there is no really good Richard biography. H

On Sunday, 10 November 2019, 12:50:19 GMT, Bale PAUL <bale.paul-trevor@...> wrote:


Hicks and Ross ware not even in my top thirty!
I'd have to add Paul Murray Kendall's Richard the Third, still the best biography of Richard because it is not only incredibly well researched but also beautifully written. And the author really likes Richard! I also add his The Yorkist Age.
David Santiuste's Edward IV and the Wars of the Roses.
Michael K Jones Bosworth 1485 .
and with s few reservations David Hipshon's Richard III and the Death of Chivalry.


Hilary Jones
 

I do wish I'd seen Robert Sheehan. Is there a recording of it anywhere? H

On Sunday, 10 November 2019, 13:08:46 GMT, Bale PAUL <bale.paul-trevor@...> wrote:


I know David Santuiste and his book is very good. Yes, so many biographies of Richard don’t do their research well. 
Hipshon wrote one which was going really well until 1483 when he ran out of energy and reverted to the tradition. Very disappointing.
Its like they get lazy.
Bit like actors playing Richard in the Henry VI/Richard III cycle. I’ve seen more than one do a great job up until they get to him being the main character, and they seem to be overwhelmed.
That’s why Robert Sheehan was so good, growing with the character then exploding with energy, sexuality, and charisma when he became the main man! 
Bale Paul Trevor




On 10 Nov 2019, at 13:58, Hilary Jones via Groups.Io <hjnatdat@...> wrote:

Thanks Paul, they're going on the list! As you can see I thought I'd be controversial :) Now I haven't heard of Santiuste's Edward IV so I'm learning already. Jones's Bosworth is indeed another favourite of mine. So sad that, Kendall apart, there is no really good Richard biography. H

On Sunday, 10 November 2019, 12:50:19 GMT, Bale PAUL <bale.paul-trevor@...> wrote:


Hicks and Ross ware not even in my top thirty!
I'd have to add Paul Murray Kendall's Richard the Third, still the best biography of Richard because it is not only incredibly well researched but also beautifully written. And the author really likes Richard! I also add his The Yorkist Age.
David Santiuste's Edward IV and the Wars of the Roses.
Michael K Jones Bosworth 1485 .
and with s few reservations David Hipshon's Richard III and the Death of Chivalry.


Hilary Jones
 

Incidentally my reasons for mine (I was made to post them before the poll went out):

Maligned King - the first work to really tackle the veracity of sources. Everyone should be made to read it before attempting a Richard biography
Eleanor - groundbreaking when it came out. The first book I know to pay real attention to TR
Edward IV - a thorough book which showed the extent of Ross's scholarship in the days before digital records. Also less bitterness against Richard which was to creep into his Richard III 
Hicks's Clarence - another one that shows what a good historian Hicks was before he got exposed to Alison Weir
York House Books - a lovely picture of Richard's Northern world with those barrels of wine trundling to Middleham  
The Merchants - a picture of another world, again beautifully researched in days when research was really hard.

H

On Sunday, 10 November 2019, 13:23:18 GMT, Hilary Jones via Groups.Io <hjnatdat@...> wrote:


I do wish I'd seen Robert Sheehan. Is there a recording of it anywhere? H

On Sunday, 10 November 2019, 13:08:46 GMT, Bale PAUL <bale.paul-trevor@...> wrote:


I know David Santuiste and his book is very good. Yes, so many biographies of Richard don’t do their research well. 
Hipshon wrote one which was going really well until 1483 when he ran out of energy and reverted to the tradition. Very disappointing.
Its like they get lazy.
Bit like actors playing Richard in the Henry VI/Richard III cycle. I’ve seen more than one do a great job up until they get to him being the main character, and they seem to be overwhelmed.
That’s why Robert Sheehan was so good, growing with the character then exploding with energy, sexuality, and charisma when he became the main man! 
Bale Paul Trevor




On 10 Nov 2019, at 13:58, Hilary Jones via Groups.Io <hjnatdat@...> wrote:

Thanks Paul, they're going on the list! As you can see I thought I'd be controversial :) Now I haven't heard of Santiuste's Edward IV so I'm learning already. Jones's Bosworth is indeed another favourite of mine. So sad that, Kendall apart, there is no really good Richard biography. H

On Sunday, 10 November 2019, 12:50:19 GMT, Bale PAUL <bale.paul-trevor@...> wrote:


Hicks and Ross ware not even in my top thirty!
I'd have to add Paul Murray Kendall's Richard the Third, still the best biography of Richard because it is not only incredibly well researched but also beautifully written. And the author really likes Richard! I also add his The Yorkist Age.
David Santiuste's Edward IV and the Wars of the Roses.
Michael K Jones Bosworth 1485 .
and with s few reservations David Hipshon's Richard III and the Death of Chivalry.


Bale PAUL
 

I wish they had filmed it! Same with the Tony Sher Richard. 



Richard liveth yet!

Le 10 nov. 2019 à 14:31 +0100, Hilary Jones via Groups.Io <hjnatdat@...>, a écrit :
Incidentally my reasons for mine (I was made to post them before the poll went out):

Maligned King - the first work to really tackle the veracity of sources. Everyone should be made to read it before attempting a Richard biography
Eleanor - groundbreaking when it came out. The first book I know to pay real attention to TR
Edward IV - a thorough book which showed the extent of Ross's scholarship in the days before digital records. Also less bitterness against Richard which was to creep into his Richard III 
Hicks's Clarence - another one that shows what a good historian Hicks was before he got exposed to Alison Weir
York House Books - a lovely picture of Richard's Northern world with those barrels of wine trundling to Middleham  
The Merchants - a picture of another world, again beautifully researched in days when research was really hard.

H
On Sunday, 10 November 2019, 13:23:18 GMT, Hilary Jones via Groups.Io <hjnatdat@...> wrote:


I do wish I'd seen Robert Sheehan. Is there a recording of it anywhere? H

On Sunday, 10 November 2019, 13:08:46 GMT, Bale PAUL <bale.paul-trevor@...> wrote:


I know David Santuiste and his book is very good. Yes, so many biographies of Richard don’t do their research well. 
Hipshon wrote one which was going really well until 1483 when he ran out of energy and reverted to the tradition. Very disappointing.
Its like they get lazy.
Bit like actors playing Richard in the Henry VI/Richard III cycle. I’ve seen more than one do a great job up until they get to him being the main character, and they seem to be overwhelmed.
That’s why Robert Sheehan was so good, growing with the character then exploding with energy, sexuality, and charisma when he became the main man! 
Bale Paul Trevor




On 10 Nov 2019, at 13:58, Hilary Jones via Groups.Io <hjnatdat@...> wrote:

Thanks Paul, they're going on the list! As you can see I thought I'd be controversial :) Now I haven't heard of Santiuste's Edward IV so I'm learning already. Jones's Bosworth is indeed another favourite of mine. So sad that, Kendall apart, there is no really good Richard biography. H

On Sunday, 10 November 2019, 12:50:19 GMT, Bale PAUL <bale.paul-trevor@...> wrote:


Hicks and Ross ware not even in my top thirty!
I'd have to add Paul Murray Kendall's Richard the Third, still the best biography of Richard because it is not only incredibly well researched but also beautifully written. And the author really likes Richard! I also add his The Yorkist Age.
David Santiuste's Edward IV and the Wars of the Roses.
Michael K Jones Bosworth 1485 .
and with s few reservations David Hipshon's Richard III and the Death of Chivalry.


Hilary Jones
 

Sad that. H

On Sunday, 10 November 2019, 14:54:33 GMT, Bale PAUL <bale.paul-trevor@...> wrote:


I wish they had filmed it! Same with the Tony Sher Richard. 



Richard liveth yet!
Le 10 nov. 2019 à 14:31 +0100, Hilary Jones via Groups.Io <hjnatdat@...>, a écrit :
Incidentally my reasons for mine (I was made to post them before the poll went out):

Maligned King - the first work to really tackle the veracity of sources. Everyone should be made to read it before attempting a Richard biography
Eleanor - groundbreaking when it came out. The first book I know to pay real attention to TR
Edward IV - a thorough book which showed the extent of Ross's scholarship in the days before digital records. Also less bitterness against Richard which was to creep into his Richard III 
Hicks's Clarence - another one that shows what a good historian Hicks was before he got exposed to Alison Weir
York House Books - a lovely picture of Richard's Northern world with those barrels of wine trundling to Middleham  
The Merchants - a picture of another world, again beautifully researched in days when research was really hard.

H
On Sunday, 10 November 2019, 13:23:18 GMT, Hilary Jones via Groups.Io <hjnatdat@...> wrote:


I do wish I'd seen Robert Sheehan. Is there a recording of it anywhere? H

On Sunday, 10 November 2019, 13:08:46 GMT, Bale PAUL <bale.paul-trevor@...> wrote:


I know David Santuiste and his book is very good. Yes, so many biographies of Richard don’t do their research well. 
Hipshon wrote one which was going really well until 1483 when he ran out of energy and reverted to the tradition. Very disappointing.
Its like they get lazy.
Bit like actors playing Richard in the Henry VI/Richard III cycle. I’ve seen more than one do a great job up until they get to him being the main character, and they seem to be overwhelmed.
That’s why Robert Sheehan was so good, growing with the character then exploding with energy, sexuality, and charisma when he became the main man! 
Bale Paul Trevor




On 10 Nov 2019, at 13:58, Hilary Jones via Groups.Io <hjnatdat@...> wrote:

Thanks Paul, they're going on the list! As you can see I thought I'd be controversial :) Now I haven't heard of Santiuste's Edward IV so I'm learning already. Jones's Bosworth is indeed another favourite of mine. So sad that, Kendall apart, there is no really good Richard biography. H

On Sunday, 10 November 2019, 12:50:19 GMT, Bale PAUL <bale.paul-trevor@...> wrote:


Hicks and Ross ware not even in my top thirty!
I'd have to add Paul Murray Kendall's Richard the Third, still the best biography of Richard because it is not only incredibly well researched but also beautifully written. And the author really likes Richard! I also add his The Yorkist Age.
David Santiuste's Edward IV and the Wars of the Roses.
Michael K Jones Bosworth 1485 .
and with s few reservations David Hipshon's Richard III and the Death of Chivalry.


nico11238@...
 

I haven't read Matthew Lewis' Richard III: Loyalty Binds Me yet, but I have heard that it is an excellent biography. Until I know for sure, I would say I would recommend Annette Carson's Richard III, the Maligned King for detailed research or David Baldwin's Richard III for a comprehensive account of Richard's life. There is a gap in the market for an up to date biography that really captures the whole of Richard's life, personality and relationships, so I hope Matthew Lewis' book can fulfill that and be added to my list along with his other book the 'The Survival of the Princes in the Tower.'

I read that latter in conjuction with John Ashdown-Hill's The Mythology of The Princes in The Tower, which I think was one of his best books. Christmas won't be the same without the latest offering from J-AH and I would also put his Eleanor the Secret Queen on my list.

For general information about the wider atmosphere of the era, I would second Sylvia Thrupp's,The Merchant Class of Medieval London, for an illuminating  portrait of the City of London and The Perkin Warbeck Conspiracy 1491-1499 by Ian Arthurson, for the foreign policy analysis, even if I don't agree with his conclusions.

Last by not least is Perkin, A Story of Deception by Ann Wroe. A superbly researched and beautifully written account of the enigma of Perkin Warbeck. I started reading it expecting a true crime type story about a narcissistic sociopath of teenager who found a career as history's greatest impostor and found something else entirely. The author leaves the verdict open, with a number of plausible possibilities, the least being Henry Tudor's story of the boatman's son. Could more research on PW be the key to exonerating Richard from all the nasty accusations about the Princes? Maybe so, which is why I keep coming back to him and Brampton (hopefully not annoying everyone on the forum in the process.)

Nico


Hilary Jones
 

Thanks Nico - they will go on the list!  H

On Monday, 11 November 2019, 19:53:17 GMT, nico11238 via Groups.Io <nico11238@...> wrote:


I haven't read Matthew Lewis' Richard III: Loyalty Binds Me yet, but I have heard that it is an excellent biography. Until I know for sure, I would say I would recommend Annette Carson's Richard III, the Maligned King for detailed research or David Baldwin's Richard III for a comprehensive account of Richard's life. There is a gap in the market for an up to date biography that really captures the whole of Richard's life, personality and relationships, so I hope Matthew Lewis' book can fulfill that and be added to my list along with his other book the 'The Survival of the Princes in the Tower.'

I read that latter in conjuction with John Ashdown-Hill's The Mythology of The Princes in The Tower, which I think was one of his best books. Christmas won't be the same without the latest offering from J-AH and I would also put his Eleanor the Secret Queen on my list.

For general information about the wider atmosphere of the era, I would second Sylvia Thrupp's,The Merchant Class of Medieval London, for an illuminating  portrait of the City of London and The Perkin Warbeck Conspiracy 1491-1499 by Ian Arthurson, for the foreign policy analysis, even if I don't agree with his conclusions.

Last by not least is Perkin, A Story of Deception by Ann Wroe. A superbly researched and beautifully written account of the enigma of Perkin Warbeck. I started reading it expecting a true crime type story about a narcissistic sociopath of teenager who found a career as history's greatest impostor and found something else entirely. The author leaves the verdict open, with a number of plausible possibilities, the least being Henry Tudor's story of the boatman's son. Could more research on PW be the key to exonerating Richard from all the nasty accusations about the Princes? Maybe so, which is why I keep coming back to him and Brampton (hopefully not annoying everyone on the forum in the process.)

Nico


Bronwyn Fraley <bronwyn.fraley110@...>
 

I have heard Matt Lewis several times and find that he is very good.  His last talk on the Princes gave very convincing arguments on the suspects but at the end were free to make your own opinion of what happened.  I could not get into Ann Wroe at all, took it as a holiday read and abandoned it.  It is now somewhere on the high seas in a cruise ship libray.  JAH book on Eleanor is also very good.  My favourite still has to be Kendall.
Re new members it might be an idea to post something to the Mortimor Society online magazine.  I,m a member of that and find a lot of them are R3 interesyed.  This year the Mortimor Society and R3 society held a joint conference in Ludlow and it was extremely goid.  Bronwyn




Sent from Samsung tablet



-------- Original message --------
From "Hilary Jones via Groups.Io" <hjnatdat@...>
Date: 12/11/2019 11:07 AM (GMT+01:00)
To richardiiiforum@groups.io,RichardIIIForum@groups.io
Subject Re: [RichardIIIForum] What are your favourite FACTUAL books about Richard and/or his times? #poll


Thanks Nico - they will go on the list!  H

On Monday, 11 November 2019, 19:53:17 GMT, nico11238 via Groups.Io <nico11238@...> wrote:


I haven't read Matthew Lewis' Richard III: Loyalty Binds Me yet, but I have heard that it is an excellent biography. Until I know for sure, I would say I would recommend Annette Carson's Richard III, the Maligned King for detailed research or David Baldwin's Richard III for a comprehensive account of Richard's life. There is a gap in the market for an up to date biography that really captures the whole of Richard's life, personality and relationships, so I hope Matthew Lewis' book can fulfill that and be added to my list along with his other book the 'The Survival of the Princes in the Tower.'

I read that latter in conjuction with John Ashdown-Hill's The Mythology of The Princes in The Tower, which I think was one of his best books. Christmas won't be the same without the latest offering from J-AH and I would also put his Eleanor the Secret Queen on my list.

For general information about the wider atmosphere of the era, I would second Sylvia Thrupp's,The Merchant Class of Medieval London, for an illuminating  portrait of the City of London and The Perkin Warbeck Conspiracy 1491-1499 by Ian Arthurson, for the foreign policy analysis, even if I don't agree with his conclusions.

Last by not least is Perkin, A Story of Deception by Ann Wroe. A superbly researched and beautifully written account of the enigma of Perkin Warbeck. I started reading it expecting a true crime type story about a narcissistic sociopath of teenager who found a career as history's greatest impostor and found something else entirely. The author leaves the verdict open, with a number of plausible possibilities, the least being Henry Tudor's story of the boatman's son. Could more research on PW be the key to exonerating Richard from all the nasty accusations about the Princes? Maybe so, which is why I keep coming back to him and Brampton (hopefully not annoying everyone on the forum in the process.)

Nico


A J Hibbard
 

Earlier this year, I started reading both Matt Lewis's & JAH's books on the princes. I got far enough to realize that they were using the same source materials & arriving at different conclusions. So I gave up & started the Dublin King. As I think I mentioned before, I preferred it because a single focus seemed clearer, although in the end JAH left it as the Dublin King was probably one of several candidates. Not sure I would recommend any of them at this point to a neophyte reader. Nor is there a biography of Richard that I find completely satisfactory, although PMK did a masterly job of assembling bits of information into reasonable order, I think he failed massively in depicting Richard's personality, & was misled by the Tanner & Wright study into accepting that Richard was responsible for the deaths of the princes.

The only Ricardian non-fiction books I can recommend whole-heartedly are Annette Carson's Maligned King & her Richard Duke of Gloucester as Lord Protector and High Constable of England.

A J


On Tue, Nov 12, 2019 at 4:36 AM Bronwyn Fraley via Groups.Io <bronwyn.fraley110=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have heard Matt Lewis several times and find that he is very good.  His last talk on the Princes gave very convincing arguments on the suspects but at the end were free to make your own opinion of what happened.  I could not get into Ann Wroe at all, took it as a holiday read and abandoned it.  It is now somewhere on the high seas in a cruise ship libray.  JAH book on Eleanor is also very good.  My favourite still has to be Kendall.
Re new members it might be an idea to post something to the Mortimor Society online magazine.  I,m a member of that and find a lot of them are R3 interesyed.  This year the Mortimor Society and R3 society held a joint conference in Ludlow and it was extremely goid.  Bronwyn




Sent from Samsung tablet



-------- Original message --------
From "Hilary Jones via Groups.Io" <hjnatdat=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Date: 12/11/2019 11:07 AM (GMT+01:00)
To richardiiiforum@groups.io,RichardIIIForum@groups.io
Subject Re: [RichardIIIForum] What are your favourite FACTUAL books about Richard and/or his times? #poll


Thanks Nico - they will go on the list!  H

On Monday, 11 November 2019, 19:53:17 GMT, nico11238 via Groups.Io <nico11238=yahoo.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:


I haven't read Matthew Lewis' Richard III: Loyalty Binds Me yet, but I have heard that it is an excellent biography. Until I know for sure, I would say I would recommend Annette Carson's Richard III, the Maligned King for detailed research or David Baldwin's Richard III for a comprehensive account of Richard's life. There is a gap in the market for an up to date biography that really captures the whole of Richard's life, personality and relationships, so I hope Matthew Lewis' book can fulfill that and be added to my list along with his other book the 'The Survival of the Princes in the Tower.'

I read that latter in conjuction with John Ashdown-Hill's The Mythology of The Princes in The Tower, which I think was one of his best books. Christmas won't be the same without the latest offering from J-AH and I would also put his Eleanor the Secret Queen on my list.

For general information about the wider atmosphere of the era, I would second Sylvia Thrupp's,The Merchant Class of Medieval London, for an illuminating  portrait of the City of London and The Perkin Warbeck Conspiracy 1491-1499 by Ian Arthurson, for the foreign policy analysis, even if I don't agree with his conclusions.

Last by not least is Perkin, A Story of Deception by Ann Wroe. A superbly researched and beautifully written account of the enigma of Perkin Warbeck. I started reading it expecting a true crime type story about a narcissistic sociopath of teenager who found a career as history's greatest impostor and found something else entirely. The author leaves the verdict open, with a number of plausible possibilities, the least being Henry Tudor's story of the boatman's son. Could more research on PW be the key to exonerating Richard from all the nasty accusations about the Princes? Maybe so, which is why I keep coming back to him and Brampton (hopefully not annoying everyone on the forum in the process.)

Nico


nico11238@...
 

Hi Bronwen, and a belated welcome to the forum from me. Yes, I agree with you that Ann Wroe's book can be hard to get into and she sometimes goes off on some unusual tangents. Actually, the book could be a lot shorter, but it is worth sticking with if you have the patience. I think there is a need for a book about Perkin Warbeck that examines all details and evidence without pushing too many conclusions, but is easier to read.

Nico


Eva_Pitter@...
 

My favorite factional book is certainly Anette Carson's "The Maligned King". The way she took a critcal look at the sources was quite new and refreshing. Next in line is Mathew Lewis' "Richard III", which covers Richard's whole life and succeeds in creating a credible portrayal of Richard. I also liked his book about Richard of York. A book that I often use, when I look for citations of original sources is "The Road to Bosworth Field" by P.W. Hammond and Anne Sutton. Paul Murray Kendal's Book was very important for me in my teenage days. It was my first book about Richard after Shakespears' Drama. I think it was great at the time, now it seems a bit outdated and I agree with A.J. that he failed in depicting Richard's personality. Another book I liked was JAH's "The last days of Richard III". And finaly Saintjust's "Edward IV And The Wars Of The Roses"

Eva


Hilary Jones
 

Can I throw in a couple more suggestions for the list:

Good King Richard? Jeremy Potter (one of the original witnesses for the defence at The Trial)
The King's Mother    Jones and Underwood - how many times do we consult this?

On Tuesday, 12 November 2019, 10:07:10 GMT, Hilary Jones via Groups.Io <hjnatdat@...> wrote:


Thanks Nico - they will go on the list!  H

On Monday, 11 November 2019, 19:53:17 GMT, nico11238 via Groups.Io <nico11238@...> wrote:


I haven't read Matthew Lewis' Richard III: Loyalty Binds Me yet, but I have heard that it is an excellent biography. Until I know for sure, I would say I would recommend Annette Carson's Richard III, the Maligned King for detailed research or David Baldwin's Richard III for a comprehensive account of Richard's life. There is a gap in the market for an up to date biography that really captures the whole of Richard's life, personality and relationships, so I hope Matthew Lewis' book can fulfill that and be added to my list along with his other book the 'The Survival of the Princes in the Tower.'

I read that latter in conjuction with John Ashdown-Hill's The Mythology of The Princes in The Tower, which I think was one of his best books. Christmas won't be the same without the latest offering from J-AH and I would also put his Eleanor the Secret Queen on my list.

For general information about the wider atmosphere of the era, I would second Sylvia Thrupp's,The Merchant Class of Medieval London, for an illuminating  portrait of the City of London and The Perkin Warbeck Conspiracy 1491-1499 by Ian Arthurson, for the foreign policy analysis, even if I don't agree with his conclusions.

Last by not least is Perkin, A Story of Deception by Ann Wroe. A superbly researched and beautifully written account of the enigma of Perkin Warbeck. I started reading it expecting a true crime type story about a narcissistic sociopath of teenager who found a career as history's greatest impostor and found something else entirely. The author leaves the verdict open, with a number of plausible possibilities, the least being Henry Tudor's story of the boatman's son. Could more research on PW be the key to exonerating Richard from all the nasty accusations about the Princes? Maybe so, which is why I keep coming back to him and Brampton (hopefully not annoying everyone on the forum in the process.)

Nico


Olga Hughes
 

Richard III A Study in Service by Rosemary Horrox
The Worlds of Richard III AJ Pollard


Eileen Bates <b.eileen25@...>
 

Maligned King - Annette Carson 
the road to Bosworth field - Hammond and Sutton 
memorials of the wars of the roses - w Hampton 
false fleeting perjured Clarence - Hicks 
royal blood - Fields
good king Richard - potter
richard Duke of York - Matthew lewis
the betrayal of Richard Ill - lamb
secret queen - John ashdown Hill 


Hilary Jones
 

Wow you've put some extras there. I'll add them to the list and republish it. Thanks Eileen!!  H

On Thursday, 21 November 2019, 21:42:35 GMT, Eileen Bates via Groups.Io <b.eileen25@...> wrote:


Maligned King - Annette Carson 
the road to Bosworth field - Hammond and Sutton 
memorials of the wars of the roses - w Hampton 
false fleeting perjured Clarence - Hicks 
royal blood - Fields
good king Richard - potter
richard Duke of York - Matthew lewis
the betrayal of Richard Ill - lamb
secret queen - John ashdown Hill 


Eileen Bates <b.eileen25@...>
 

Your welcome!