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Morse code program for Raspberry Pi


Doug Baker
 

Long time back I had a CW send/receive program than ran under DOS (Quick and Easy CW with the PC, WB8DQT, QST - Jan. 1995).  It used the parallel port on the PC for sending and displaying the received code.  Has anyone been successful at developing a similar program to run on one of the versions of a Raspberry Pi? I realize it would require a piece of hardware that would have to interface with some of the Pi's GPIO pins.  I am not opposed to building something, just don't see a need to re-invent the wheel if it has already been done by someone!  Would appreciate any thoughts on this.

73's, Doug - k4cle


Daniel Holmes
 

I’m not familiar with the exact setup (In college around the same time, I wrote an x86 assembly program for a class to decode CW via serial port!), but FLDIGI will decode CW nicely using a sound card setup.

Dan
--
Daniel Holmes, danielh@...
"Laugh while you can, monkey boy!" -- Lord John Whorfin


On Dec 10, 2019, at 9:45 AM, Doug Baker via Groups.Io <kfourcle@...> wrote:

Long time back I had a CW send/receive program than ran under DOS (Quick and Easy CW with the PC, WB8DQT, QST - Jan. 1995).  It used the parallel port on the PC for sending and displaying the received code.  Has anyone been successful at developing a similar program to run on one of the versions of a Raspberry Pi? I realize it would require a piece of hardware that would have to interface with some of the Pi's GPIO pins.  I am not opposed to building something, just don't see a need to re-invent the wheel if it has already been done by someone!  Would appreciate any thoughts on this.

73's, Doug - k4cle



Doug Baker
 

Thanks Dan.  I'll investigate that possibility. I would still need to come up with a way to transmit CW using  the Pi's keyboard.  Since FLDIGI is opensource, maybe l cold add the encode capability??  I'll take a look at his code.

Doug



On Tue, Dec 10, 2019 at 11:35 AM, Daniel Holmes
<danielh@...> wrote:
I’m not familiar with the exact setup (In college around the same time, I wrote an x86 assembly program for a class to decode CW via serial port!), but FLDIGI will decode CW nicely using a sound card setup.

Dan
--
Daniel Holmes, danielh@...
"Laugh while you can, monkey boy!" -- Lord John Whorfin


On Dec 10, 2019, at 9:45 AM, Doug Baker via Groups.Io <kfourcle@...> wrote:

Long time back I had a CW send/receive program than ran under DOS (Quick and Easy CW with the PC, WB8DQT, QST - Jan. 1995).  It used the parallel port on the PC for sending and displaying the received code.  Has anyone been successful at developing a similar program to run on one of the versions of a Raspberry Pi? I realize it would require a piece of hardware that would have to interface with some of the Pi's GPIO pins.  I am not opposed to building something, just don't see a need to re-invent the wheel if it has already been done by someone!  Would appreciate any thoughts on this.

73's, Doug - k4cle



Daniel Holmes
 

It also transmits CW using the sound card. On most radios it ends up being a sideband signal, and not true CW due to the data nature of the interface, but it’s generally still copyable—I really can’t tell a difference when I’m working it.

Thanks,
Dan

--
Daniel Holmes, danielh@...
"Laugh while you can, monkey boy!" -- Lord John Whorfin


On Dec 11, 2019, at 5:03 AM, Doug Baker via Groups.Io <kfourcle@...> wrote:

Thanks Dan.  I'll investigate that possibility. I would still need to come up with a way to transmit CW using  the Pi's keyboard.  Since FLDIGI is opensource, maybe l cold add the encode capability??  I'll take a look at his code.

Doug



On Tue, Dec 10, 2019 at 11:35 AM, Daniel Holmes
<danielh@...> wrote:
I’m not familiar with the exact setup (In college around the same time, I wrote an x86 assembly program for a class to decode CW via serial port!), but FLDIGI will decode CW nicely using a sound card setup.

Dan
--
Daniel Holmes, danielh@...
"Laugh while you can, monkey boy!" -- Lord John Whorfin


On Dec 10, 2019, at 9:45 AM, Doug Baker via Groups.Io <kfourcle@...> wrote:

Long time back I had a CW send/receive program than ran under DOS (Quick and Easy CW with the PC, WB8DQT, QST - Jan. 1995).  It used the parallel port on the PC for sending and displaying the received code.  Has anyone been successful at developing a similar program to run on one of the versions of a Raspberry Pi? I realize it would require a piece of hardware that would have to interface with some of the Pi's GPIO pins.  I am not opposed to building something, just don't see a need to re-invent the wheel if it has already been done by someone!  Would appreciate any thoughts on this.

73's, Doug - k4cle




David Ranch
 


It's been discussed many times in various linux forums but doing CW properly isn't very easy.  The consensus keeps coming back to using a keyer such as a WinKeyer chip maintain proper TX timing, etc.  There are various Linux programs that support the Winkeyer but to get superior decodes, I would recommend to start with Flwkey as a lot of effort has gone into that code to decipher variably timed transmissions, decode through various weak signal and fade scenarios, etc:

   http://www.w1hkj.com/flwkey-help/

--David
KI6ZHD



On 12/10/2019 09:35 AM, Daniel Holmes wrote:
I’m not familiar with the exact setup (In college around the same time, I wrote an x86 assembly program for a class to decode CW via serial port!), but FLDIGI will decode CW nicely using a sound card setup.

Dan
--
Daniel Holmes, danielh@...
"Laugh while you can, monkey boy!" -- Lord John Whorfin


Jim Higgins
 

Received from Daniel Holmes at 12/11/2019 13:10 UTC:

It also transmits CW using the sound card. On most radios it ends up being a sideband signal, and not true CW due to the data nature of the interface, but it’s generally still copyable—I really can’t tell a difference when II’m working it.

You can't tell a difference a pure single frequency tone into a rig set for SSB produces a pure single frequency RF output.

Same for FSK RTTY and AFSK RTTY. No difference.

73 de Jim, KB3PU


Dave Wickert
 

Hmm. While SSB does *suppress* the carrier, in practice it does not eliminate it entirely. While your ear might not be able to detect the SSB carrier, it is there if you look for it. For example I can see it on my SDRPlay -- and thus I can see the difference (albeit only a small one). Hope that helps.

73.

_-_-_ Dave, AE7TD

-----Original Message-----
From: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io <RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim Higgins
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 11:30 AM
To: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] Morse code program for Raspberry Pi

Received from Daniel Holmes at 12/11/2019 13:10 UTC:

It also transmits CW using the sound card. On most radios it ends up
being a sideband signal, and not true CW due to the data nature of the
interface, but it’s generally still copyable—I really can’t tell a
difference when II’m working it.

You can't tell a difference a pure single frequency tone into a rig set for SSB produces a pure single frequency RF output.

Same for FSK RTTY and AFSK RTTY. No difference.

73 de Jim, KB3PU