R Pi and Alexa - for Amateur Radio


Brian Reay
 

I've been dabbling with Alexa and Arduino - with mixed success to be honest. But my first choice for 'tinkering' is, of course. the R Pi.

Has anyone had any success with using the R Pi controlled by Alexa? 

With the Arduino, the method is to make the Arduino 'mimic' one of the standard devices that a skill exists for.  I assume, if someone has cracked the technique for the R Pi a similar technique is used.  However. I'm open to suggestions, other approaches etc.

Pointers to websites/projects to adapt appreciated.

73
Brian


Armin, DJ2AG
 

I use Node-RED with Alexa node on Raspi Zero W.

see 
https://flows.nodered.org/node/node-red-contrib-alexa-local
for details.


Ray Cadmus
 

I am using habridge on a PI to control lights with x-10 and sonoff switches.  Works with Alexa.  "Alexa, turn desk lamp on please".  also experimenting with openhab and home assistant (hass).  The sonoff switches have a esp8266 that is Arduino compatible and switches via WIFI.     tasmoto and easy esp software are available to flash with the Arduino IDE. or one of several flash programs.  I use esptool.py.   The mochad software is used to control the old x-10 devices.

https://github.com/bwssytems/ha-bridge

https://nodemcu.readthedocs.io/en/master/en/flash/#esptoolpy

https://github.com/arendst/Sonoff-Tasmota

http://x10linux.blogspot.com/2012/08/installing-mochad-on-raspberry-pi.html

Enjoy - but be careful, it can be addictive chasing the next, best way...

Regards,

Ray    W9EUM

--


On 02/11/2018 05:52 AM, Brian Reay via Groups.Io wrote:
I've been dabbling with Alexa and Arduino - with mixed success to be honest. But my first choice for 'tinkering' is, of course. the R Pi.

Has anyone had any success with using the R Pi controlled by Alexa? 

With the Arduino, the method is to make the Arduino 'mimic' one of the standard devices that a skill exists for.  I assume, if someone has cracked the technique for the R Pi a similar technique is used.  However. I'm open to suggestions, other approaches etc.

Pointers to websites/projects to adapt appreciated.

73
Brian
_._,_._,_




Joseph LaFerla
 

Hi Ray

 

I used to use habridge as well to control x10 lights emulating the Phillips hue device but some time ago that stopped working and when I tried to discover the device it would send me to the Meethue sebsite to sign on.  This is evidently as a result of something that Phillips did. Since then, I lost the voice control ability.

 

Joe

VA3JLF

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Ray Cadmus
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:48 AM
To: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] R Pi and Alexa - for Amateur Radio

 

I am using habridge on a PI to control lights with x-10 and sonoff switches.  Works with Alexa.  "Alexa, turn desk lamp on please".  also experimenting with openhab and home assistant (hass).  The sonoff switches have a esp8266 that is Arduino compatible and switches via WIFI.     tasmoto and easy esp software are available to flash with the Arduino IDE. or one of several flash programs.  I use esptool.py.   The mochad software is used to control the old x-10 devices.

https://github.com/bwssytems/ha-bridge

https://nodemcu.readthedocs.io/en/master/en/flash/#esptoolpy

https://github.com/arendst/Sonoff-Tasmota

http://x10linux.blogspot.com/2012/08/installing-mochad-on-raspberry-pi.html

Enjoy - but be careful, it can be addictive chasing the next, best way...

Regards,

Ray    W9EUM

--

 

On 02/11/2018 05:52 AM, Brian Reay via Groups.Io wrote:

I've been dabbling with Alexa and Arduino - with mixed success to be honest. But my first choice for 'tinkering' is, of course. the R Pi.

Has anyone had any success with using the R Pi controlled by Alexa? 

With the Arduino, the method is to make the Arduino 'mimic' one of the standard devices that a skill exists for.  I assume, if someone has cracked the technique for the R Pi a similar technique is used.  However. I'm open to suggestions, other approaches etc.

Pointers to websites/projects to adapt appreciated.

73
Brian

 


Ray Cadmus
 

I keep experimenting.  While habridge has been working for me it did seem somewhat limited so I keep looking.  I just shifted to node-red and so far it is working with both my x-10 and sonoff devices.  It may end up as the keeper - who knows?  To me it's just a learning experience - a game maybe...

Enjoy,

ray    w9eum

--


On 02/11/2018 09:00 AM, Joseph LaFerla wrote:

Hi Ray

 

I used to use habridge as well to control x10 lights emulating the Phillips hue device but some time ago that stopped working and when I tried to discover the device it would send me to the Meethue sebsite to sign on.  This is evidently as a result of something that Phillips did. Since then, I lost the voice control ability.

 

Joe

VA3JLF

 




Terry L. Morris
 

Trying to figure out from your post how Alexa has anything to do with Amateur Radio as the title of your post suggests. Others commenting about habridge and X10 have nothing to do with Amateur Radio that I am aware of. So please Brian, and others that have posted explain to me how you propose to use these devices with your Raspberry Pi for Amateur Radio. Thanks.

Terry KB8AMZ


 

Trying to figure out from your post how Alexa has anything to do with Amateur Radio
My third Alexa is in the radio room next to the 222 MHz radio. If I
want to listen remotely I can just "drop in" on the Alexa named
"radio" and monitor what's being received from my phone or Kindle
tablet. Outgoing and radio control are in the near future.. With
rPI tech we'll be able to do even more.

73
Bill, WA7NWP


Ray Cadmus
 

Why, because typically the hams are the innovators.  Where else would one go for advice.  I suspect that most hams dealing with the PI are also into home automation and probably trying to automate some of their radio functions as well.

Ray    W9EUM

--


On 02/15/2018 03:55 PM, Terry L. Morris wrote:
Trying to figure out from your post how Alexa has anything to do with Amateur Radio as the title of your post suggests. Others commenting about habridge and X10 have nothing to do with Amateur Radio that I am aware of. So please Brian, and others that have posted explain to me how you propose to use these devices with your Raspberry Pi for Amateur Radio. Thanks.

Terry KB8AMZ


 


Terry L. Morris
 

That sheds light on your previous comments. Strange most people carry their phone, cellular, on their person. To each his/her own. I guess some people need to be connected most of their awake time.
72
Terry KB8AMZ


Terry L. Morris
 

You suspect that most hams dealing with the Pi are also into home automation? Wow. I find this statement very difficult to support.


Terry L. Morris
 

John, I can see the future use of voice commands to do tasks we now do with hands. I realize that Pavel is showing an experiment and a possible use.

72
Terry KB8AMZ


Steve, KB9MWR
 

Back in 2012 I did some ham radio stuff with ASR (automatic speech recognition) at that time Alexa didn't exist that I know of, so I did it with Googles API.

http://kb9mwr.blogspot.com/2012/02/ham-radio-voice-recognition.html

I still have a Raspberry Pi that is listens for two-tone fire and EMS pages. And when that happens the next few seconds of audio are submitted to Googles ASR API and the transcript is logged to file and sent to me as a text message of the call.

Honestly I haven't looked into if there is an API for Alexa or if you have to use their hardware.


 

On Thu, Feb 22, 2018 at 9:33 AM, Steve KB9MWR via Groups.Io <kb9mwr@...> wrote:
Back in 2012 I did some ham radio stuff with ASR (automatic speech recognition)  at that time Alexa didn't exist that I know of, so I did it with Googles API.

http://kb9mwr.blogspot.com/2012/02/ham-radio-voice-recognition.html

I still have a Raspberry Pi that is listens for two-tone fire and EMS pages.  And when that happens the next few seconds of audio are submitted to Googles ASR API and the transcript is logged to file and sent to me as a text message of the call.

Honestly I haven't looked into if there is an API for Alexa or if you have to use their hardware.







--


John D. Hays
Edmonds, WA
K7VE

   


Kevin Elliott
 

Steve,

I still have a Raspberry Pi that is listens for two-tone fire and EMS pages. And when that happens the next few seconds of audio are submitted to Googles ASR API and the transcript is logged to file and sent to me as a text message of the call.
How cool. Can you share implementation details for this? I’d love to set that up.

Kevin
KK6NHN


 

On Thu, Feb 22, 2018 at 10:09 AM, Kevin Elliott <kevin@...> wrote:
Steve,

> I still have a Raspberry Pi that is listens for two-tone fire and EMS pages.  And when that happens the next few seconds of audio are submitted to Googles ASR API and the transcript is logged to file and sent to me as a text message of the call.

How cool. Can you share implementation details for this? I’d love to set that up.

Kevin
KK6NHN





--


John D. Hays
Edmonds, WA
K7VE

   


Bill Diaz
 

Guys,
    I am experimenting with remote operating using 2 Echo Dots for audio,  with a Raspberry Pi running PiHpSDR and RealVNC, connected to an Apache Labs 100D. The remote end currently uses a Surface Pro 4 running RealVNC client.  Seems to work ok, but more testing needed.

    The Echo Dots use the Alexa "Drop in" feature to establish a two way audio connection.  The station end has the receiver speaker closely coupled to the Station Echo Dot, and the 3.5mm TRS output jack of the Dot is connected to the mic input of the 100D.  Latency appears to be somewhat variable, likely due to the load on the Amazon Servers.   Not perfect, but this should work with voice audio and any transceiver with external audio connection capability.

   Don't know if I can attach drawings here, but attached a drawing showing how it all works.

Bill KC9XG

On 2/22/2018 11:33 AM, Steve KB9MWR via Groups.Io wrote:
Back in 2012 I did some ham radio stuff with ASR (automatic speech recognition) at that time Alexa didn't exist that I know of, so I did it with Googles API.

http://kb9mwr.blogspot.com/2012/02/ham-radio-voice-recognition.html

I still have a Raspberry Pi that is listens for two-tone fire and EMS pages. And when that happens the next few seconds of audio are submitted to Googles ASR API and the transcript is logged to file and sent to me as a text message of the call.

Honestly I haven't looked into if there is an API for Alexa or if you have to use their hardware.




Steve, KB9MWR
 

I use the two-tone detect Pi image:
http://www.twotonedetect.net/twotonedetect-pi-image/
That is setup to spawn a recording that is then sent to google's API.