Date   

Re: pitnc_get params gives me "Bad file descriptor

james <jmsrandazzo@...>
 

who gives  rat ass

On 3/23/2020 4:41 PM, John Tetreault (WA1OKB) wrote:
Unless you're running modified version of Raspbian, such as Pi-Star, which doesn't have the config program.

On Mon, Mar 23, 2020, 6:31 PM <list-raspberry_pi_4-ham_radio@...> wrote:
raspi-config is just a shell script. One way to see what is does is to
read it:

   more /usr/bin/rapsi-config


Max via Groups.Io wrote on 2020-03-23 6:56 a.m.:
> Personally, I like to know what changes raspi-config makes to the OS. In
> the early days of the PI, raspi-config either didn't exist, or didn't
> have all the options it does now. Maybe not so important now, but I
> still want to know.
>
> Max KG4PID




Re: pitnc_get params gives me "Bad file descriptor

John Tetreault (WA1OKB)
 

Unless you're running modified version of Raspbian, such as Pi-Star, which doesn't have the config program.


On Mon, Mar 23, 2020, 6:31 PM <list-raspberry_pi_4-ham_radio@...> wrote:
raspi-config is just a shell script. One way to see what is does is to
read it:

   more /usr/bin/rapsi-config


Max via Groups.Io wrote on 2020-03-23 6:56 a.m.:
> Personally, I like to know what changes raspi-config makes to the OS. In
> the early days of the PI, raspi-config either didn't exist, or didn't
> have all the options it does now. Maybe not so important now, but I
> still want to know.
>
> Max KG4PID




Re: Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

John Tetreault (WA1OKB)
 

Of course someone has thought of repurposing a PC power supply.... I actually repurposed an entire mini tower case and power supply for my repeater build... The 5 1/4" drive bays fit two mobile radios quite nicely.

Then just used one of these to breakout 12v for the radios, and 5v to power a raspberry pi repeater controller




On Mon, Mar 23, 2020, 8:31 AM BruceN <k4tql@...> wrote:
Has no one thought of using a repurposed PC power supply?  I took an old PC supply, removed most of the inside wires and replaced them with 10/12 gauge conductors.  Put banana jacks or Graypole connectors on the case for 12 VDC, 5 VDC and 3 VDC.  Made up a small distribution board using USB A receptacles for 5 VDC and then use good quality USB A to micro A cables for 5 V.  Got plenty of power (many amps) and service several Pi's or other boards.  Cost: about $40 if you bought new.  0 if you scarfed the supply from an old PC.

I haven't had any issues with noise because I try to use only heavy duty power supplies.  Believe it or no,, you can tell by weight.  If it's light, it will be noisy.  BTW, I use these supplies on a couple of radios, too.  So far, so good.

If you do a web search, you'll find several sources with information on how to re-purpose the supplies.  There is even one which shows how to change the 12 VDC to 13.6 VDC more suitable for most radio equipment.

My only gripe and frustration is how to find heavy duty USB cables.  And price doesn't mean a thing.  I've paid a pretty penny for "heavy duty" cables only to find that they are crap for DC.  I'm considering adding a good coaxial connect to the Pi for DC.  A little less handy but it will eliminate low voltage issues.

BruceN / K4TQL


Re: pitnc_get params gives me "Bad file descriptor

list-raspberry_pi_4-ham_radio@...
 

raspi-config is just a shell script. One way to see what is does is to read it:

more /usr/bin/rapsi-config


Max via Groups.Io wrote on 2020-03-23 6:56 a.m.:

Personally, I like to know what changes raspi-config makes to the OS. In the early days of the PI, raspi-config either didn't exist, or didn't have all the options it does now. Maybe not so important now, but I still want to know.
Max KG4PID


Re: Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

Ray Wells
 

Who died and left you in charge?

Most people are sensible enough to realise that sometimes a simplistic question doesn't get the best answers and, as many people here know, a lot of RPi problems can't be solved by using "a good power supply", per se. The original question invited OT answers to ensure the OP was on the right track, and fragmenting such answers to a new topic destroys the flow of valid and valuable closely related, as in joined at the hip, information, especially for newbies who already find it difficult enough to wade through the available information, and who don't know WHICH questions to ask to get answers. If somebody suspected a voltage related SD Card failure, then that too is related to the power supply and voltage drop, making it very much ON topic.

This is a forum to help RPi users resolve problems, not a place where individuals are afraid to post for fear of someone jumping on them.

You don't intimidate me, bullies never do. Lighten up.

Ray vk2tv

On 24/3/20 8:28 am, chuck gelm wrote:
On 3/22/20 2:46 PM, Mark Griffith via Groups.Io wrote:
Eh, I've been using the same PNC 32GB Class 10 SD card for more than 4 years. This card started life on an old Pi 2, then to a Pi 3 and now to a Pi 4. I have re-imaged it many times, installed and uninstalled many many software packages on it, and done all the PiGate development work on this same card with absolutely zero problems.  It sits here sending and receiving email messages all day and night, and is always available when I try to login. Total reliability for more then 4 years.

One day, just like a hard disk, it will fail.  But I have backups.

I'd say, from my experience, don't waste your money on "premiere" cards.  Just make sure it is a Class 10 card.

My 2 cents.

Mark
KD0QYN
Hijacked topic.


Re: Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

chuck gelm <rpi4ham@...>
 

On 3/23/20 12:06 PM, Allen wrote:
Bruce,
If you want some good Cat6 cable use Ubiquity Tough Cable. It is double shielded and has a drain wire. You just need your ends. Yes I wondering  if you should just use 50 ohm or consider using 70 ohm. 70 ohm is great for video and audio which is digital. In my past business we used only 70 ohm for video and audio with the police vests and dog vests. In your case you do not need to worry about connectors in the RF world as they have special 70 ohm connectors for that. In you case they are USB3 or 2 and micro USB.
Allen Higgins
KE8KZO
_.
hijacked topic.


Re: Raspberry Pi3+b With 4 relay Plate

chuck gelm <rpi4ham@...>
 

On 3/23/20 12:51 AM, Allen wrote:
Type in terminal http://wiki.52pi.com/index.php?title=4 Channel_Relay_Hat_Board_For_Raspberry_Pi_SKU:_EP-0099
"http://wiki.52pi.com/index.php?title=4 Channel_Relay_Hat_Board_For_Raspberry_Pi_SKU:_EP-0099"

looks like a URL for a 'web resource'.

It seems to me this is not something that would be 'Type in terminal'.
:-|


Re: Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

chuck gelm <rpi4ham@...>
 

On 3/22/20 5:17 PM, Ray Wells wrote:
I think that's an unnecessary expense, and the hundreds of thousands of RPi's using Class 10 (even worse) consumer grade cards speaks highly of the reliability of those cards, especially if recommended methods to reduce write cycles is followed. Failures are a very low count overall, and their use extends well beyond just the RPi.
Again, topic was hijacked.


Re: Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

chuck gelm <rpi4ham@...>
 

On 3/22/20 2:46 PM, Mark Griffith via Groups.Io wrote:
Eh, I've been using the same PNC 32GB Class 10 SD card for more than 4 years. This card started life on an old Pi 2, then to a Pi 3 and now to a Pi 4. I have re-imaged it many times, installed and uninstalled many many software packages on it, and done all the PiGate development work on this same card with absolutely zero problems.  It sits here sending and receiving email messages all day and night, and is always available when I try to login. Total reliability for more then 4 years.

One day, just like a hard disk, it will fail.  But I have backups.

I'd say, from my experience, don't waste your money on "premiere" cards.  Just make sure it is a Class 10 card.

My 2 cents.

Mark
KD0QYN
Hijacked topic.


Re: Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

chuck gelm <rpi4ham@...>
 

On 3/22/20 8:30 AM, Sam KJ4VPI wrote:
many times we experience voltage deviations.
A typical 120vac to 5vdc power supply accepts 100 to 240 vac.
Do your AC mains fluctuate out side of those limits?


Re: Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

Teton Amateur Radio Repeater Association (TARRA)
 

If you use some type over regulating system to drop it down to 5V, keep your 5V lead length as short as you can. I think mine are about three inches long.

Mick - W7CAT

----- Original Message -----
From: Ray Wells
To: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io
Sent: Monday, March 23, 2020 03:06:15 PM
Subject: Re: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

>
> +1 on the power supply socket and its related problems. I still haven't
> overlooked employing a dangling lead with a coaxial line socket for each
> of my RPi's. Then I ca be absolutely certain the power lead has adequate
> conductor size.
>
> Ray vk2tv
>
> On 24/3/20 1:22 am, Max via Groups.Io wrote:
> > I agree with the problem of finding heavy duty USB cables. I wish the
> > pi had an on-board regulator that would accept 8 to 18 volts or so
> > along with a coaxial power connection. That would have eliminated most
> > if not all of the power problems that users have had over the years.
> >
> > I keep looking for a USB power cable much like what you would have if
> > you were to cut off the cable of a Pi4 power supply. Just a USB-C
> > connector on a 20awg two-wire cable. Then I could use a single power
> > supply and distribute the power to multiple Pi's.
> >
> > Max KG4PID
> >
> > On Monday, March 23, 2020, 07:31:34 AM CDT, BruceN
> > wrote:
> >
> >
> > Has no one thought of using a repurposed PC power supply?  I took an
> > old PC supply, removed most of the inside wires and replaced them with
> > 10/12 gauge conductors.  Put banana jacks or Graypole connectors on
> > the case for 12 VDC, 5 VDC and 3 VDC.  Made up a small distribution
> > board using USB A receptacles for 5 VDC and then use good quality USB
> > A to micro A cables for 5 V. Got plenty of power (many amps) and
> > service several Pi's or other boards.  Cost: about $40 if you bought
> > new.  0 if you scarfed the supply from an old PC.
> >
> > I haven't had any issues with noise because I try to use only heavy
> > duty power supplies.  Believe it or no,, you can tell by weight.  If
> > it's light, it will be noisy. BTW, I use these supplies on a couple of
> > radios, too. So far, so good.
> >
> > If you do a web search, you'll find several sources with information
> > on how to re-purpose the supplies.  There is even one which shows how
> > to change the 12 VDC to 13.6 VDC more suitable for most radio equipment.
> >
> > My only gripe and frustration is how to find heavy duty USB cables. 
> > And price doesn't mean a thing.  I've paid a pretty penny for "heavy
> > duty" cables only to find that they are crap for DC.  I'm considering
> > adding a good coaxial connect to the Pi for DC.  A little less handy
> > but it will eliminate low voltage issues.
> >
> > BruceN / K4TQL
> >
>
>
>
>
>
--

 

0


Re: Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

Ray Wells
 

+1 on the power supply socket and its related problems. I still haven't overlooked employing a dangling lead with a coaxial line socket for each of my RPi's. Then I ca be absolutely certain the power lead has adequate conductor size.

Ray vk2tv

On 24/3/20 1:22 am, Max via Groups.Io wrote:
I agree with the problem of finding heavy duty USB cables. I wish the pi had an on-board regulator that would accept 8 to 18 volts or so along with a coaxial power connection. That would have eliminated most if not all of the power problems that users have had over the years.

I keep looking for a USB power cable much like what you would have if you were to cut off the cable of a Pi4 power supply. Just a USB-C connector on a 20awg two-wire cable. Then I could use a single power supply and distribute the power to multiple Pi's.

Max KG4PID

On Monday, March 23, 2020, 07:31:34 AM CDT, BruceN <k4tql@dts-ga.com> wrote:


Has no one thought of using a repurposed PC power supply?  I took an old PC supply, removed most of the inside wires and replaced them with 10/12 gauge conductors.  Put banana jacks or Graypole connectors on the case for 12 VDC, 5 VDC and 3 VDC.  Made up a small distribution board using USB A receptacles for 5 VDC and then use good quality USB A to micro A cables for 5 V. Got plenty of power (many amps) and service several Pi's or other boards.  Cost: about $40 if you bought new.  0 if you scarfed the supply from an old PC.

I haven't had any issues with noise because I try to use only heavy duty power supplies.  Believe it or no,, you can tell by weight.  If it's light, it will be noisy. BTW, I use these supplies on a couple of radios, too. So far, so good.

If you do a web search, you'll find several sources with information on how to re-purpose the supplies.  There is even one which shows how to change the 12 VDC to 13.6 VDC more suitable for most radio equipment.

My only gripe and frustration is how to find heavy duty USB cables.  And price doesn't mean a thing.  I've paid a pretty penny for "heavy duty" cables only to find that they are crap for DC.  I'm considering adding a good coaxial connect to the Pi for DC.  A little less handy but it will eliminate low voltage issues.

BruceN / K4TQL


Re: Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

Allen
 

Max,
   Why not use a buck converter (around a buck or two) on a board that mounts as an add-on board and have your connector hardwired to and from the buck converter. Then you can have a 12VDC switching power supply and use it as your back end and distribution point to each Pi you use for whatever.
Or just use a power supply from an old computer and get your 12 VDC or 5 VDC.
Allen Higgins
KE8KZO


Re: Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

Bill Lamm
 

I am building a Gordon Gibby digital modem? isolator? To sit between a rasp pi and any one of my radios.. they will be in the same box with a battery and a buck boost converter.. end goal is they can plug into just about any external supply or battery.. I will power rasp pi at the rail.. the digital isolator will be always through the buck boost

Plans may change I may go with one battery (bank) for everything but uBITX,  VHF/UHF and HF radios will have similar batt or external power options for flexibility in the field 


Re: Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

Allen
 

Bruce,
If you want some good Cat6 cable use Ubiquity Tough Cable. It is double shielded and has a drain wire. You just need your ends. Yes I wondering  if you should just use 50 ohm or consider using 70 ohm. 70 ohm is great for video and audio which is digital. In my past business we used only 70 ohm for video and audio with the police vests and dog vests. In your case you do not need to worry about connectors in the RF world as they have special 70 ohm connectors for that. In you case they are USB3 or 2 and micro USB.
Allen Higgins
KE8KZO


Re: Raspberry Pi3+b With 4 relay Plate

Martin Cooper
 

Hi Allen,

Okay, so it is *not* the pi-plates project you're trying to work with. According to the wiki page you mentioned, you don't need Git or anything other than Python and the smbus library:

"The following code is recommended to be executed using Python 3 and install the smbus library"

There is info about a Git repo at the bottom of the wiki page, but you do *not* need it. If you want to pursue it, then you should go to the GitHub page here (as mentioned at the bottom of the wiki page):


and then follow the steps under "How To Setup". The steps are clear. You need to follow the first set of instructions (Install i2c-tools), and the second (Detect Device Address), but you don't really need the third (Clone Repository), because the Pyhon code in the wiki page is exactly the same as what's in the repo, so you can just copy the code from the wiki page instead.

To condense down the steps that I believe you *do* need, they are:

* sudo apt-get update
* sudo apt-get -y install i2c-tools
* pip3 install smbus2
* i2cdetect -y 1
* Copy the Python code from the wiki page.

You do not do anything with Git. It will be simpler for you to just follow these steps and use the code from the wiki page.

Martin.
KD6YAM

On Sun, Mar 22, 2020 at 9:52 PM Allen <alhiggins@...> wrote:
My Python does not recognize clone. When I referred to wiki it stated Please according to the wiki guidance to setup your Raspberry Pi. Type in terminal http://wiki.52pi.com/index.php?title=4 Channel_Relay_Hat_Board_For_Raspberry_Pi_SKU:_EP-0099 This is on the documentation that was with the 4Relay plate.
Allen Higgins
KE8KZO


Re: Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

Dallas N4DDM
 

This gizmo off of EBAY makes it somewhat simple and gives you a bench supply for other projects...
US 20/24Pin ATX Benchtop Board Computer PC Power Supply Breakout Adapter Module | eBay


This one has ONE usb connector so a short cable would power the PI...


What I'd like to find is one of these where the 5V keep-alive/standby supply could power the PI and then the PI could turn on the rest of the supply by sending a low to the PSON# pin...  


There are a bunch of these gizmos on ebay but I've never found one that gives access to the 3-5 amp +5VSB connection...






73 Dallas, KD4HNX
Whatever you do, don’t fall victim to “paralysis by
analysis.” Go ahead and buy/build one and start 
tinkering with it. This is a learn by doing hobby.

No politician or scholar assured your freedoms.
A Soldier, Sailor, Marine, or Airman did!


On Monday, March 23, 2020, 08:31:35 AM EDT, BruceN <k4tql@...> wrote:


Has no one thought of using a repurposed PC power supply?  I took an old PC supply, removed most of the inside wires and replaced them with 10/12 gauge conductors.  Put banana jacks or Graypole connectors on the case for 12 VDC, 5 VDC and 3 VDC.  Made up a small distribution board using USB A receptacles for 5 VDC and then use good quality USB A to micro A cables for 5 V.  Got plenty of power (many amps) and service several Pi's or other boards.  Cost: about $40 if you bought new.  0 if you scarfed the supply from an old PC.

I haven't had any issues with noise because I try to use only heavy duty power supplies.  Believe it or no,, you can tell by weight.  If it's light, it will be noisy.  BTW, I use these supplies on a couple of radios, too.  So far, so good.

If you do a web search, you'll find several sources with information on how to re-purpose the supplies.  There is even one which shows how to change the 12 VDC to 13.6 VDC more suitable for most radio equipment.

My only gripe and frustration is how to find heavy duty USB cables.  And price doesn't mean a thing.  I've paid a pretty penny for "heavy duty" cables only to find that they are crap for DC.  I'm considering adding a good coaxial connect to the Pi for DC.  A little less handy but it will eliminate low voltage issues.

BruceN / K4TQL


Re: Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

Charles Gallo
 

I’ll try and find the link, but I posted it here before
We ship a LOT of RPis, all with power supply and screen (even MORE power)
We use this one supply, works well, seems to be RF quiet

Note: There is an identical looking one from China. We bought them. We won’t ship them. They are junk. Noisy RF wise, the tend to fail. Easy to tell the two apart, the cheap one weighs about 1/2 what the good one does

--  
73 de KG2V
Charlie

On Mar 23, 2020, at 10:24 AM, Max via Groups.Io <kg4pid@...> wrote:


I agree with the problem of finding heavy duty USB cables. I wish the pi had an on-board regulator that would accept 8 to 18 volts or so along with a coaxial power connection. That would have eliminated most if not all of the power problems that users have had over the years.

I keep looking for a USB power cable much like what you would have if you were to cut off the cable of a Pi4 power supply. Just a USB-C connector on a 20awg two-wire cable. Then I could use a single power supply and distribute the power to multiple Pi's.

Max KG4PID 

On Monday, March 23, 2020, 07:31:34 AM CDT, BruceN <k4tql@...> wrote:


Has no one thought of using a repurposed PC power supply?  I took an old PC supply, removed most of the inside wires and replaced them with 10/12 gauge conductors.  Put banana jacks or Graypole connectors on the case for 12 VDC, 5 VDC and 3 VDC.  Made up a small distribution board using USB A receptacles for 5 VDC and then use good quality USB A to micro A cables for 5 V.  Got plenty of power (many amps) and service several Pi's or other boards.  Cost: about $40 if you bought new.  0 if you scarfed the supply from an old PC.

I haven't had any issues with noise because I try to use only heavy duty power supplies.  Believe it or no,, you can tell by weight.  If it's light, it will be noisy.  BTW, I use these supplies on a couple of radios, too.  So far, so good.

If you do a web search, you'll find several sources with information on how to re-purpose the supplies.  There is even one which shows how to change the 12 VDC to 13.6 VDC more suitable for most radio equipment.

My only gripe and frustration is how to find heavy duty USB cables.  And price doesn't mean a thing.  I've paid a pretty penny for "heavy duty" cables only to find that they are crap for DC.  I'm considering adding a good coaxial connect to the Pi for DC.  A little less handy but it will eliminate low voltage issues.

BruceN / K4TQL


Re: Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

Max
 

Not very convenient if you have a Hat or need those power pins to supply power to other devices. And most of my Pi's have something attached, so for me, that is not a viable option.

Max KG4PID


On Monday, March 23, 2020, 08:45:37 AM CDT, John D Hays - K7VE <john@...> wrote:

You can go directly to the 5vdc rail on the GPIO.



Re: Looking for a good power supply that will handle a load

Max
 

I agree with the problem of finding heavy duty USB cables. I wish the pi had an on-board regulator that would accept 8 to 18 volts or so along with a coaxial power connection. That would have eliminated most if not all of the power problems that users have had over the years.

I keep looking for a USB power cable much like what you would have if you were to cut off the cable of a Pi4 power supply. Just a USB-C connector on a 20awg two-wire cable. Then I could use a single power supply and distribute the power to multiple Pi's.

Max KG4PID 

On Monday, March 23, 2020, 07:31:34 AM CDT, BruceN <k4tql@...> wrote:


Has no one thought of using a repurposed PC power supply?  I took an old PC supply, removed most of the inside wires and replaced them with 10/12 gauge conductors.  Put banana jacks or Graypole connectors on the case for 12 VDC, 5 VDC and 3 VDC.  Made up a small distribution board using USB A receptacles for 5 VDC and then use good quality USB A to micro A cables for 5 V.  Got plenty of power (many amps) and service several Pi's or other boards.  Cost: about $40 if you bought new.  0 if you scarfed the supply from an old PC.

I haven't had any issues with noise because I try to use only heavy duty power supplies.  Believe it or no,, you can tell by weight.  If it's light, it will be noisy.  BTW, I use these supplies on a couple of radios, too.  So far, so good.

If you do a web search, you'll find several sources with information on how to re-purpose the supplies.  There is even one which shows how to change the 12 VDC to 13.6 VDC more suitable for most radio equipment.

My only gripe and frustration is how to find heavy duty USB cables.  And price doesn't mean a thing.  I've paid a pretty penny for "heavy duty" cables only to find that they are crap for DC.  I'm considering adding a good coaxial connect to the Pi for DC.  A little less handy but it will eliminate low voltage issues.

BruceN / K4TQL

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