Date   

Re: Virtual Sound Card?

yindra
 

I've used ALSA to split audio from the SignaLink into two applications.
Here is my .asoundrc

# playback PCM device 
pcm.amix {
  type dmix
  ipc_key 1234
  slave.pcm "hw:Loopback,0,0"
}
# capture PCM device
pcm.asnoop {
  type dsnoop
  ipc_key 1235
  slave.pcm "hw:Loopback,0,1"
}
# duplex devcie combinding asnoop and amix
pcm.aduplex {
  type asym
  playback.pcm "amix"
  capture.pcm "asnoop"
  hint {
    show on
    description "combines loopback asnoop(input) and amix(output)"
  }
}
pcm.!default {
  type plug
  slave.pcm "aduplex"
}
 
I would like to learn more about implementing Jack.


Re: W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released

Michael WA7SKG
 

To elucidate:

What's a tarball? - or - How do I unpack or create a .tgz or .tar.gz file?
Answer:

Most Unix software on the net is distributed in the form of a tarball. This just means that all the files have been packed into a tar file, which has been compressed with gzip to save space. The file name thus ends up having extension .tar.gz. Sometimes this is shortened to .tgz.

To unpack a tarball:

tar zxvf filename

To list the files in a tarball:

tar ztvf filename

To make a new tarball fred.tar.gz from a directory fred:

tar zcvf fred.tar.gz fred

or

tar cvf fred.tar fred ; gzip fred.tar

If all those cvfs and zxvfs make your head spin, refer to this table, which explains what they all mean:
c create an archive
f filename the name of the archive file
t table of contents: tell me what's in an archive
v verbose: tell me what's going on
x extract from an archive
z put the archive through gzip


HTH,
Michael WA7SKG



Perry Ogletree wrote on 11/1/19 10:07 PM:

/Thanks! I had always equated “tar” and “tarball” packed files as alike, going all the way back to the old Unix TAR command. Still learning after 40 years in computers./
/In any event, Windows needs help to deal with either where as it is native in ‘nux OS./
//
/Perry/
//
*From:* RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io <RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Dave Slotter, W3DJS
*Sent:* Friday, November 1, 2019 06:32 PM
*To:* RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io
*Subject:* Re: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released
Perry,
TAR format... TAR stands for "Tape ARchive". It's a collection of files. Please don't confuse file.tar with file.tar.gz (also called a "tarball"). A *.tar file is uncompressed. A *.tar.gz is compressed. A *.tar.bz2 is also compressed.
Hope this helps.
73,
--
- Dave
W3DJS <https://www.qrz.com/db/W3DJS>


Re: W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released

Perry Ogletree
 

Thanks! I had always equated “tar” and “tarball” packed files as alike, going all the way back to the old Unix TAR command. Still learning after 40 years in computers.

In any event, Windows needs help to deal with either where as it is native in ‘nux OS.

 

Perry

 

From: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io <RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Slotter, W3DJS
Sent: Friday, November 1, 2019 06:32 PM
To: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released

 

Perry,

TAR format... TAR stands for "Tape ARchive". It's a collection of files. Please don't confuse file.tar with file.tar.gz (also called a "tarball"). A *.tar file is uncompressed. A *.tar.gz is compressed. A *.tar.bz2 is also compressed.

Hope this helps.

73,
--
- Dave
  W3DJS


Re: W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released

chuck gelm <rpi4ham@...>
 

On 10/31/19 5:38 PM, Marty Hartwell wrote:
USB disk that can be configured to be root disk
 I do not recommend any type of Solid State disk for '/' or '/swap'.
An SD card is solid state, as are USB thumb/flash drives and SSHDs.
A small cheap 2.5" magnetic spinning USB drive makes a fine '/' and/or /'swap' filesystem.
'/boot' is fine on the SD card as it is read only.
$0.02
Chuck


Re: W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released

Michael WA7SKG
 

A 'tar' file is sort of a package, often referred to as a "tarball". It can be one or many files. It is often zipped, which can be a number of formats, usually adding an additional extension like file.tar.gz. You can extract the files using the 'tar' command. I believe it works the same in MACOS as it does in Linux. Use something like "tar -xzf file.tar.gz" which will generally decompress and extract all the files.

If the MAC supports man pages, you can use "man tar" on the command line to read about tar. You can get basic option info with tar --help or tar -H.

HTH,
Michael WA7SKG


KE3KQ wrote on 11/1/19 2:30 PM:

Ok, slowly making some progress after numerous download fits and starts. All this in MacOS 10.15.1
Got a copy that was compressed in bzip2 and managed to get it to uncompress from the command line which resulted in a .tar file. Simply double clicking the file seems to decompress it but the resulting file does not work in Etcher.
GalenaEtcher does not seem to know what to do with the .tar file (18.36 GB). When trying to make the image selection the .tar file is light grey and cannot be selected.
This is such a great idea, I hope I can file flashed onto the SD card.
*** Ben KE3KQ


Re: Virtual Sound Card?

Mark Griffith
 

Yeah, you can use a SignaLink USB to receive audio from two radios using the plain old audio jacks in the back.  No need for a custom cable  Then use two apps to read the audio input from the alsa 1.0 port.

Unless you don't have a SignaLink.

Mark
KD0QYN


On Friday, November 1, 2019, 6:52:26 PM CDT, Ray Wells <vk2tv@...> wrote:


I've had a great lack of success getting Jack/qjackctl to play with USB sound devices. The short version is it doesn't "see" the likes of CM108 and Behringer UCA202 USB sound devices. I understand the alsa loopback option is a way around this but I'm too old and grumpy to be creating convoluted sound configuration files (;->)

To shoot you in a different direction, Linux kernel AX25 has been able to use multiple programs with a single TNC/sound card since day one. Just give each program a different SSID and point them all at the same portname that's listed in axports. Or, If you're using Direwolf check out its AGW port option for multiple programs. This from the Direwolf User manual ...

4.3 AGW TCPIP socket interface
Dire Wolf provides a server function with the “AGW TCPIP Socket Interface” on default port 8000. Up to 3 different client applications can connect at the same time.

HTH
Ray vk2tv


On 2/11/19 10:20 am, David Rhoads wrote:
Hey Jason,

I don't know if you have heard of Jack. I have been fiddling with it a little lately for audio production work. It somehow acts as an interface between pulse audio and the applications. Then there's an application called jackctl I believe that lets you select which applications to send the audio to. I'm not sure if this would work for ham radio, but it's probably worth a shot.

On Fri, Nov 1, 2019 at 3:37 pm, km4ack <jason.oleham@...> wrote:
I want to use two different applications to monitor the same frequency at once with one USB sound card. I understand this can be done with "virtual sound cards" but have no idea where to start. Can anyone point me in the right direction?

73, de KM4ACK
Find Me On Youtube


Re: Virtual Sound Card?

Ray Wells
 

I've had a great lack of success getting Jack/qjackctl to play with USB sound devices. The short version is it doesn't "see" the likes of CM108 and Behringer UCA202 USB sound devices. I understand the alsa loopback option is a way around this but I'm too old and grumpy to be creating convoluted sound configuration files (;->)

To shoot you in a different direction, Linux kernel AX25 has been able to use multiple programs with a single TNC/sound card since day one. Just give each program a different SSID and point them all at the same portname that's listed in axports. Or, If you're using Direwolf check out its AGW port option for multiple programs. This from the Direwolf User manual ...

4.3 AGW TCPIP socket interface
Dire Wolf provides a server function with the “AGW TCPIP Socket Interface” on default port 8000. Up to 3 different client applications can connect at the same time.

HTH
Ray vk2tv


On 2/11/19 10:20 am, David Rhoads wrote:
Hey Jason,

I don't know if you have heard of Jack. I have been fiddling with it a little lately for audio production work. It somehow acts as an interface between pulse audio and the applications. Then there's an application called jackctl I believe that lets you select which applications to send the audio to. I'm not sure if this would work for ham radio, but it's probably worth a shot.

On Fri, Nov 1, 2019 at 3:37 pm, km4ack <jason.oleham@...> wrote:
I want to use two different applications to monitor the same frequency at once with one USB sound card. I understand this can be done with "virtual sound cards" but have no idea where to start. Can anyone point me in the right direction?

73, de KM4ACK
Find Me On Youtube


Re: Virtual Sound Card?

Siegfried Jackstien
 

no need to use virtual sc ... just select in both app the same input device

dg9bfc sigi

Am 01.11.2019 um 22:37 schrieb km4ack:

I want to use two different applications to monitor the same frequency at once with one USB sound card. I understand this can be done with "virtual sound cards" but have no idea where to start. Can anyone point me in the right direction?

73, de KM4ACK
Find Me On Youtube


Re: W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released

Mark Griffith
 

Dave,

Unless you don't give it the correct extension name and confuse the hell out of everyone.  :)

In that case, the "file" command is your friend.

Mark
KD0QYN


On Friday, November 1, 2019, 6:32:44 PM CDT, Dave Slotter, W3DJS <slotter@...> wrote:


Perry,

TAR format... TAR stands for "Tape ARchive". It's a collection of files. Please don't confuse file.tar with file.tar.gz (also called a "tarball"). A *.tar file is uncompressed. A *.tar.gz is compressed. A *.tar.bz2 is also compressed.

Hope this helps.

73,
--
- Dave
  W3DJS


Re: W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released

Dave Slotter, W3DJS
 

Perry,

TAR format... TAR stands for "Tape ARchive". It's a collection of files. Please don't confuse file.tar with file.tar.gz (also called a "tarball"). A *.tar file is uncompressed. A *.tar.gz is compressed. A *.tar.bz2 is also compressed.

Hope this helps.

73,
--
- Dave
  W3DJS


Re: W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released

Mark Griffith
 

Not trying to be a jerk, but tar files are not compressed by default.  The right set of command line options have to be enabled for it to be compressed.

Mark
KD0QYN


On Friday, November 1, 2019, 4:38:51 PM CDT, Perry Ogletree <pogletree@...> wrote:


A "tar" file is still compressed like a zip file. You need to un-compress it to get the image file for Etcher. In Windows, I like PowerArchiver, as it un-"zips" many compression formats. I'm sure there are other tools that can do it (native tools in Linux) in Windows, etc.

Perry K4PWO
-----Original Message-----
From: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io <RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io> On Behalf Of KE3KQ
Sent: Friday, November 1, 2019 04:30 PM
To: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released

Ok, slowly making some progress after numerous download fits and starts.  All this in MacOS 10.15.1

Got a copy that was compressed in bzip2 and managed to get it to uncompress from the command line which resulted in a .tar file.  Simply double clicking the file seems to decompress it but the resulting file does not work in Etcher.

GalenaEtcher does not seem to know what to do with the .tar file (18.36 GB).  When trying to make the image selection the .tar file is light grey and cannot be selected.

This is such a great idea, I hope I can file flashed onto the SD card.

*** Ben KE3KQ







Re: Virtual Sound Card?

David Rhoads
 

Hey Jason,

I don't know if you have heard of Jack. I have been fiddling with it a little lately for audio production work. It somehow acts as an interface between pulse audio and the applications. Then there's an application called jackctl I believe that lets you select which applications to send the audio to. I'm not sure if this would work for ham radio, but it's probably worth a shot.

On Fri, Nov 1, 2019 at 3:37 pm, km4ack <jason.oleham@...> wrote:
I want to use two different applications to monitor the same frequency at once with one USB sound card. I understand this can be done with "virtual sound cards" but have no idea where to start. Can anyone point me in the right direction?

73, de KM4ACK
Find Me On Youtube


Re: Virtual Sound Card?

km4ack
 

Thanks John!

73, de KM4ACK
Find Me On Youtube


Re: Virtual Sound Card?

 

Unfortunately the wiki write up is missing at https://nw-digital-radio.groups.io/g/udrc/wiki/home
but it is based on the information here https://github.com/nwdigitalradio/split-channels
Read up on pulseaudio and create multiple instances in asound.conf



On Fri, Nov 1, 2019 at 3:37 PM km4ack <jason.oleham@...> wrote:
I want to use two different applications to monitor the same frequency at once with one USB sound card. I understand this can be done with "virtual sound cards" but have no idea where to start. Can anyone point me in the right direction?

73, de KM4ACK
Find Me On Youtube



--
John D. Hays
Kingston, WA
K7VE

 


Virtual Sound Card?

km4ack
 

I want to use two different applications to monitor the same frequency at once with one USB sound card. I understand this can be done with "virtual sound cards" but have no idea where to start. Can anyone point me in the right direction?

73, de KM4ACK
Find Me On Youtube


Re: W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released

Perry Ogletree
 

A "tar" file is still compressed like a zip file. You need to un-compress it to get the image file for Etcher. In Windows, I like PowerArchiver, as it un-"zips" many compression formats. I'm sure there are other tools that can do it (native tools in Linux) in Windows, etc.

Perry K4PWO

-----Original Message-----
From: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io <RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io> On Behalf Of KE3KQ
Sent: Friday, November 1, 2019 04:30 PM
To: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released

Ok, slowly making some progress after numerous download fits and starts. All this in MacOS 10.15.1

Got a copy that was compressed in bzip2 and managed to get it to uncompress from the command line which resulted in a .tar file. Simply double clicking the file seems to decompress it but the resulting file does not work in Etcher.

GalenaEtcher does not seem to know what to do with the .tar file (18.36 GB). When trying to make the image selection the .tar file is light grey and cannot be selected.

This is such a great idea, I hope I can file flashed onto the SD card.

*** Ben KE3KQ


Re: W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released

Steve McGrane <temporarilyoffline@...>
 

Etcher should be able to read the .tar.gz file directly if I recall... so you have a couple of choices:

1:---------------
gzip filename.tar # <turns it back into a .tar.gz
open with etcher and burn
or 2:--------------------
tar -x filename.tar # <turns it into a raw disk image
open with etcher and burn


On Fri, Nov 1, 2019 at 4:30 PM KE3KQ <ben@...> wrote:
Ok, slowly making some progress after numerous download fits and starts.  All this in MacOS 10.15.1

Got a copy that was compressed in bzip2 and managed to get it to uncompress from the command line which resulted in a .tar file.   Simply double clicking the file seems to decompress it but the resulting file does not work in Etcher.

GalenaEtcher does not seem to know what to do with the .tar file (18.36 GB).   When trying to make the image selection the .tar file is light grey and cannot be selected.

This is such a great idea, I hope I can file flashed onto the SD card.

*** Ben KE3KQ




Re: W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released

KE3KQ
 

Ok, slowly making some progress after numerous download fits and starts. All this in MacOS 10.15.1

Got a copy that was compressed in bzip2 and managed to get it to uncompress from the command line which resulted in a .tar file. Simply double clicking the file seems to decompress it but the resulting file does not work in Etcher.

GalenaEtcher does not seem to know what to do with the .tar file (18.36 GB). When trying to make the image selection the .tar file is light grey and cannot be selected.

This is such a great idea, I hope I can file flashed onto the SD card.

*** Ben KE3KQ


Re: Subscription changes don't work

Alan Melia
 


That is odd Allen they only way that should happen is if you have two subscriptions to the Group. put that one to ''no email'' and see what happens.
Alan
G3NYK
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, November 01, 2019 7:03 PM
Subject: Re: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] Subscription changes don't work

See screenshot.  Just accessed website, but made no changes.


Re: W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released

Mark Griffith
 

Perry,

Yes, as I said, USB drive I/O will be much faster than an SD card. even if it is a "regular" HD and not a solid state drive.  I could go on and on but no one wants to hear my rants.  :)

The Raspberry Pi was designed for experimentation, so do what you feel you want to do, and learn as you go!

Mark
KD0QYN


On Friday, November 1, 2019, 11:24:53 AM CDT, Perry Ogletree <afa4nq@...> wrote:


Most of the people going to “disk” storage are using a small (120/240 Gb) SSD in a USB 3.0 housing.  You will see improved boot times and better overall response.

 

Perry K4PWO

 

From: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io <RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark Griffith via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, October 31, 2019 05:02 PM
To: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] W3DJS Raspberry Pi Ham Radio Image v2.0 Released

 

Now-a-days, SD cards are pretty robust so there is no need to buy an extra USB hard drive.  That only makes it harder to power the Pi as you also need to provide power to the HD.

 

If you use Class 10 SD cards, or U1-3, you will have years of hard use.  I have a Class 10 32GB SD card I have been using for nearly 4 years in my development Pi and it still works perfectly.  I've also had hard drives that last years and years, and some that fail quickly.  That's why I back everything up regularly.  I recommend Class 10 cards for all my projects and no one has every had a failure that I am aware of.  That is all I use.

 

Of course, the fastest SD card can't compare to the speed of a USB 3.0 disk drive for I/O, but let's face it....the vast majority of what we do with the RaspPi's will never need those speeds.  10MB/s is still pretty fast.

 

In every situation I have seen, you still need an SD card in the Pi to boot from, and then you can configure it to switch to the USB drive.  I don't think the Pi 4 is any different.

 

Something else to consider, my Pi3's run about 20 degrees cooler than the Pi4, which seems to just be a hotter device.  I installed a set of those cheap Internet cooling fins and it didn't make any difference.  A case with a fan might be required on these, especially if you are intending to drive it hard. Something else to consume power.

 

Just my 2 cents.

 

Mark

KD0QYN

 

 

On Thursday, October 31, 2019, 4:39:29 PM CDT, Marty Hartwell <mhartwe@...> wrote:

 

 

I will be placing my order for the Pi4 with the 4GB memory. I will be looking at the time of order what will

be available for loading I may be able to order a disk at that time. .

I have seen mention of using a more robust USB disk that can be configured to be root disk is there information on this option or what is you opinion of this?

Marty kd8bj

 

 

On 10/31/2019 3:19 PM, Dave Slotter, W3DJS wrote:

Hi Marty,

32GB Micro SD cards are available for just slightly under $10, or less than going out to lunch (around where I live anyway).

Good luck with the download and install!

Please remember to read the README.TXT. It has some important info, like why the "network doesn't seem to work".

--
- Dave
  W3DJS

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