Date   

Re: partition for lubuntu from previous ubuntu

Don - KM4UDX <dontAy155@...>
 

Mark -- I have a Pi clone (Atomic Pi), but the concepts are similar.  I finally got a USB stick swap file, and when I open a bunch of web pages (etc.), I run out of mem, and I can see the swap file start to be used.  While not the fastest operation, it sure beats a lockup. 

Now I'm stuck in editing the etc/f.... File that would mount the swap at boot. Even that simple operation. Is a pain in the next.  First, I don't have permission to write the file, then I have to figure out the syntax in some weird editor that I have never used. 

Really, not to wine, but it is a major pain in the neck if you are new to all this...


Re: download for RTL-SDR radio

Marty Hartwell
 

Hi Jeff

Thanks for the tips. I haven't decided what I want to do with it so I think your

idea of several google searches will be in order. I think the first order is to get a

low level of use to start with and move on from there.


Marty

On 10/17/19 8:30 PM, Jeff Palmer wrote:
There are dozens of projects for an rtl-sdr dongle and a raspberry pi.

- install direwolf,  monitor APRS
- add a cheap 2m radio to the above, and make an aprs digipeater
- install pi-aware, and monitor the ADS-B signal from airplanes
- create a scanner for listening to your local police/fire/ems/taxis/other
- cheap spectrum analyzer
- NOAA weather satellite receiver
- if you have an older car, record the lock/unlock codes from it's key fob, and play it back with rpitx..  Next time you lock your keys in the car, you'll be ready.  
- add speakers, and use it as an FM radio
- need a good source of random entropy (say for generating massive amounts of TLS certificates or other crypto things?)   check out https://github.com/pwarren/rtl-entropy

If none of those interest you,  google for "Pi" and "rtlsdr" and you'll find literally hundreds of project ideas.

welcome to SDR!






On Thu, Oct 17, 2019 at 5:39 PM Marty Hartwell <mhartwe@...> wrote:
Hi

I have just received  an RTL-SDR radio with antenna kit to play with. So

I was thinking of using it with my laptop running Xubuntu, but thought

can I use my Raspberry PI. So anybody doing that I did a search on my

phone and found some hits, so I will be looking again but any hints?


Marty kd8bj







--
Jeff Palmer
Palmer IT Consulting, LLC.


Re: download for RTL-SDR radio

Jeff Palmer
 

There are dozens of projects for an rtl-sdr dongle and a raspberry pi.

- install direwolf,  monitor APRS
- add a cheap 2m radio to the above, and make an aprs digipeater
- install pi-aware, and monitor the ADS-B signal from airplanes
- create a scanner for listening to your local police/fire/ems/taxis/other
- cheap spectrum analyzer
- NOAA weather satellite receiver
- if you have an older car, record the lock/unlock codes from it's key fob, and play it back with rpitx..  Next time you lock your keys in the car, you'll be ready.  
- add speakers, and use it as an FM radio
- need a good source of random entropy (say for generating massive amounts of TLS certificates or other crypto things?)   check out https://github.com/pwarren/rtl-entropy

If none of those interest you,  google for "Pi" and "rtlsdr" and you'll find literally hundreds of project ideas.

welcome to SDR!






On Thu, Oct 17, 2019 at 5:39 PM Marty Hartwell <mhartwe@...> wrote:
Hi

I have just received  an RTL-SDR radio with antenna kit to play with. So

I was thinking of using it with my laptop running Xubuntu, but thought

can I use my Raspberry PI. So anybody doing that I did a search on my

phone and found some hits, so I will be looking again but any hints?


Marty kd8bj







--
Jeff Palmer
Palmer IT Consulting, LLC.


Re: Ubuntu19.10 & Raspi4

Vince A
 

@Roger
Awesome! Thanks for the tip!

On Oct 17 2019, at 3:08 pm, Roger Reeves M0ROJ via Groups.Io <m0roj@...> wrote:
Good news. Just seen the announcement that Ubuntu 19.10 will support RasPi 4. 
Sent from Mailspring


download for RTL-SDR radio

Marty Hartwell
 

Hi

I have just received  an RTL-SDR radio with antenna kit to play with. So

I was thinking of using it with my laptop running Xubuntu, but thought

can I use my Raspberry PI. So anybody doing that I did a search on my

phone and found some hits, so I will be looking again but any hints?


Marty kd8bj


Re: Ubuntu19.10 & Raspi4

Marty Hartwell
 

Hi

There was a Ubuntu 1?.something awhile ago the worked on the Raspberry Pi 2. I

tried it out back then and reverted back to the Raspian Jessie I think. So I am not

surprised that 19.10 will be supported on the Raspi4. I will be submitting an order

soon to get a pi4 with 4GB of memory and some other things I haven't yet decided on.


Marty kd8bj


On 10/17/19 4:08 PM, Roger Reeves M0ROJ wrote:
Good news. Just seen the announcement that Ubuntu 19.10 will support RasPi 4. 


Ubuntu19.10 & Raspi4

Roger Reeves M0ROJ
 

Good news. Just seen the announcement that Ubuntu 19.10 will support RasPi 4. 


Re: partition for lubuntu from previous ubuntu

Mark Griffith
 

Raspbian, the default OS for the Raspberry Pi, does not use a swap partition, it uses a swap file on the regular file system.  If your memory usage is not too much, it will never swap.  I always create my systems with no swap at all, and in the years I have been using them, I have never encountered a problem.  Of course, these devices are just used to process email and things like that.  No memory intensive video or other type of memory hungry apps.  My applications use less then 20% of the available memory so it never swaps.

However, if you will be using memory intensive applications, you might want to create a swap file.

Mark
KD0QYN


On Thursday, October 17, 2019, 11:11:44 AM CDT, Marty Hartwell <mhartwe@...> wrote:


HI

If this is a Rpi 4 I think I saw a response that swap is not needed, or is a real small amount. So

you may be good to go.

You probably should review the instructions for the pi 4 though, as I have not ordered one yet.

It is in my future though.

Marty kd8bj


On 10/17/19 7:09 AM, Don - KM4UDX wrote:
Yes, you are right.  I got the USB bootable with gparted live,  and it would boot to the gparted selection screen, but then no matter what option i picked, including gparted safeboot, the sequence would never actually start gparted. 

So I've given up for now.  I'm going to try to make my USB3 port and usb3 stick a swap file with the following process.
 
≠====================

1) Make sure your USB stick is connected. In a terminal type:
 
sudo blkid
 
It will list all your connected drives. Search for your USB stick you want to use as swap and copy the UUID (everything inside these quotes UUID="XXXXXXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXXXXXXXXXX").
 
This represents the individual name of your device.
 
Also note the /dev/XXX point of your device.
 
2) Now unmount your device by typing:
 
sudo umount /dev/XXX (where XXX represents your device name)
 
3) Format your USB stick as swap, e.g. by terminal
 
sudo mkswap /dev/XXX (<-- be sure to use the correct device name here or you'll probably end up formatting the wrong drive!)
 
or simply use GParted.
 
4) Now you have to edit your /etc/fstab file, so type
 
gksudo gedit /etc/fstab
 
and enter the following
 
UUID=XXXXXXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXXXXXXXXXX none swap sw,pri=5 0 0
 
(for all the Xs, use the UUID number you got by typing sudo blkid)
 
5) Now type
 
sudo swapon -a
 
That's it, this should already work


Re: partition for lubuntu from previous ubuntu

Marty Hartwell
 

HI

If this is a Rpi 4 I think I saw a response that swap is not needed, or is a real small amount. So

you may be good to go.

You probably should review the instructions for the pi 4 though, as I have not ordered one yet.

It is in my future though.

Marty kd8bj


On 10/17/19 7:09 AM, Don - KM4UDX wrote:
Yes, you are right.  I got the USB bootable with gparted live,  and it would boot to the gparted selection screen, but then no matter what option i picked, including gparted safeboot, the sequence would never actually start gparted. 

So I've given up for now.  I'm going to try to make my USB3 port and usb3 stick a swap file with the following process.
 
≠====================

1) Make sure your USB stick is connected. In a terminal type:
 
sudo blkid
 
It will list all your connected drives. Search for your USB stick you want to use as swap and copy the UUID (everything inside these quotes UUID="XXXXXXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXXXXXXXXXX").
 
This represents the individual name of your device.
 
Also note the /dev/XXX point of your device.
 
2) Now unmount your device by typing:
 
sudo umount /dev/XXX (where XXX represents your device name)
 
3) Format your USB stick as swap, e.g. by terminal
 
sudo mkswap /dev/XXX (<-- be sure to use the correct device name here or you'll probably end up formatting the wrong drive!)
 
or simply use GParted.
 
4) Now you have to edit your /etc/fstab file, so type
 
gksudo gedit /etc/fstab
 
and enter the following
 
UUID=XXXXXXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXXXXXXXXXX none swap sw,pri=5 0 0
 
(for all the Xs, use the UUID number you got by typing sudo blkid)
 
5) Now type
 
sudo swapon -a
 
That's it, this should already work


Re: partition for lubuntu from previous ubuntu

Don - KM4UDX <dontAy155@...>
 

Yes, you are right.  I got the USB bootable with gparted live,  and it would boot to the gparted selection screen, but then no matter what option i picked, including gparted safeboot, the sequence would never actually start gparted. 

So I've given up for now.  I'm going to try to make my USB3 port and usb3 stick a swap file with the following process.
 
≠====================

1) Make sure your USB stick is connected. In a terminal type:
 
sudo blkid
 
It will list all your connected drives. Search for your USB stick you want to use as swap and copy the UUID (everything inside these quotes UUID="XXXXXXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXXXXXXXXXX").
 
This represents the individual name of your device.
 
Also note the /dev/XXX point of your device.
 
2) Now unmount your device by typing:
 
sudo umount /dev/XXX (where XXX represents your device name)
 
3) Format your USB stick as swap, e.g. by terminal
 
sudo mkswap /dev/XXX (<-- be sure to use the correct device name here or you'll probably end up formatting the wrong drive!)
 
or simply use GParted.
 
4) Now you have to edit your /etc/fstab file, so type
 
gksudo gedit /etc/fstab
 
and enter the following
 
UUID=XXXXXXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXXXXXXXXXX none swap sw,pri=5 0 0
 
(for all the Xs, use the UUID number you got by typing sudo blkid)
 
5) Now type
 
sudo swapon -a
 
That's it, this should already work


Re: RPi 3B+ w/ Buster, Alsa, Signalink USB

Yaniv Eliash
 

I missed that massage,
I have both RPi3 and RPi4 on buster with Signalink.

If you don't have audio - try to plug the Signalink to your RPi *AFTER* your RPi boot
I found that when you plug everything and then power things up - you won't have audio I/O

On Wed, 16 Oct 2019 at 22:34, Mitch <ab4mw@...> wrote:
So nobody has RPi 3B+/Buster working with a Signalink??


Re: RPi 3B+ w/ Buster, Alsa, Signalink USB

Mark Griffith
 

Yes, it's pretty easy. What problem are you having?

Mark 
KD0QYN 



On Wed, Oct 16, 2019 at 2:34 PM, Mitch
<ab4mw@...> wrote:
So nobody has RPi 3B+/Buster working with a Signalink??


Re: RPi 3B+ w/ Buster, Alsa, Signalink USB

Mitch
 

So nobody has RPi 3B+/Buster working with a Signalink??


Re: partition for lubuntu from previous ubuntu

 

I'm guessing that the partition needs to be unmounted first so you'll need to put the memory card in another computer to do it or boot from a thumb drive.


On 16 October 2019 at 13:15 Don - KM4UDX <dontAy155@...> wrote:

Nigel -- I'm sure I'm doing something really stupid...but when I change the value in the new size window, it changes back to original, and I never get to the resize option...


Nigel A. Gunn, 1865 El Camino Drive, Xenia, OH 45385-1115, USA. tel +1 937 825 5032
Amateur Radio G8IFF W8IFF and GMRS WRBV701, e-mail nigel@... www http://www.ngunn.net


Re: partition for lubuntu from previous ubuntu

Don - KM4UDX <dontAy155@...>
 

Nigel -- I'm sure I'm doing something really stupid...but when I change the value in the new size window, it changes back to original, and I never get to the resize option...


Re: partition for lubuntu from previous ubuntu

David Ranch <dranch@...>
 


Swap *partitions* are NOT required on Raspbian as it uses a in-file system swap *file* for this use:

   https://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/questions/70/how-to-set-up-swap-space

Btw, as mentioned elsewhere in this thread, swapping I/O to an SD card can physically damage the card and kill it pretty quickly.  It's generally NOT recommend to significantly use swap if you don't have to.  If you need more RAM than what's on your Raspberry Pi (older versions had 256MB or 512MB) and most newer Pis have 1GB), you should setup the swap on an external USB device be it a USB pendrive (only a little better reliability wise) or an SSD/HDD.  Better yet, go buy a new 2GB or 4GB Rpi4 and you hopefully won't need swap at all.  :-)
pi4 and you hopefully won't need swap at all.  :-)

--David
KI6ZHD


On 10/16/2019 08:51 AM, Nigel Gunn, G8IFF/W8IFF wrote:

Your swap partition is usually twice the size of your RAM so I assume you'll want a 4GB swap partition.

You could really do with a bigger memory card.

As swap needs to be fast, and SD cards die if used too much you would be better in the long term doing most things on a small USB hard drive or SSD and move the operating system to that and just boot from the SD card.



To create a swap partition:

Highlight the  ext4 partition

Go to Partition/Resize and make the partition 4GB smaller than it is now (reduce it's size to 10GB).

Click Apply

Resize will take some time.

Highlight the unused space entry that appears, go to Partition/Format and select SWAP as the format.

Click Apply.

Reboot



Re: partition for lubuntu from previous ubuntu

 

Your swap partition is usually twice the size of your RAM so I assume you'll want a 4GB swap partition.

You could really do with a bigger memory card.

As swap needs to be fast, and SD cards die if used too much you would be better in the long term doing most things on a small USB hard drive or SSD and move the operating system to that and just boot from the SD card.



To create a swap partition:

Highlight the  ext4 partition

Go to Partition/Resize and make the partition 4GB smaller than it is now (reduce it's size to 10GB).

Click Apply

Resize will take some time.

Highlight the unused space entry that appears, go to Partition/Format and select SWAP as the format.

Click Apply.

Reboot


On 16 October 2019 at 11:25 Don - KM4UDX <dontAy155@...> wrote:

Nigel (+)...I installed gparted and have this.  So goal is to create a swap.  What is the best way to do this for a chicken newbie? Is there anything else that I did that needs fixing?


Nigel A. Gunn, 1865 El Camino Drive, Xenia, OH 45385-1115, USA. tel +1 937 825 5032
Amateur Radio G8IFF W8IFF and GMRS WRBV701, e-mail nigel@... www http://www.ngunn.net


Re: GPS time synchronization with several Pi's at different locations.

Max
 

Both warp speed navigation and sub-space communications require much better accuracy. That is one of the first things they teach you at the academy !

Max KG4PID

On Wednesday, October 16, 2019, 08:12:17 AM CDT, Michael WA7SKG <wa7skg@...> wrote:


Pico-seconds? Seriously? You need something like a $100k+ Cesium-beam
clock to maintain that kind of accuracy. For a $35 computer? Basically
unrealistic if not unobtainium.

I have worked on systems in the past (mostly classified) that required
exceptional time accuracy, but even those were within a couple hundred
microseconds and VERY expensive.

Really curious, however, please explain the purpose of such a beast.
What on earth could possibly require that kind of time accuracy? I
seriously doubt even warp speed navigation or sub-space communications
needs that level of time synchronization.

Michael WA7SKG


Jeff Estal wrote on 10/15/19 6:44 PM:
> I want to synchronize multiple raspberry pi's where each has it's own
> gps device.
> They need to be extremely accurate. Something in the pico seconds range.
>
> I have a cheap gps-usb device from Amazon and have been recieving data
> from it with python, but the time data only displays seconds always with
> .00 for any portion of the seconds which seems odd.
>
> How might i approach this?
> Is certain hardware better or worse?
> When data is pulled from a gps device, is there timing considerations as
> to when to get the data or when to store it?
> I"d probably need to also have a realtime clock to update.
>
> thanks,




Re: partition for lubuntu from previous ubuntu

Don - KM4UDX <dontAy155@...>
 

Nigel (+)...I installed gparted and have this.  So goal is to create a swap.  What is the best way to do this for a chicken newbie? Is there anything else that I did that needs fixing?


Re: partition for lubuntu from previous ubuntu

Don - KM4UDX <dontAy155@...>
 

Nigel (+) -- can you give me some pointers on how to do this?

I'm really new to all this lubuntu/ubuntu/linix business. So I am playing catchup as fast as I can...

here is what I have now...I found different cmds that show sort of the same info.
===============================================================================
don@ubitx-love:~$ sudo lsblk -o NAME,FSTYPE,SIZE,MOUNTPOINT,LABEL

NAME         FSTYPE  SIZE MOUNTPOINT LABEL
mmcblk0             14.6G           
├─mmcblk0p1  vfat    500M /boot/efi 
└─mmcblk0p2  ext4   14.1G /         
mmcblk0boot0           4M           
mmcblk0boot1           4M           
don@ubitx-love:~$
============================================================================
sudo parted -l
Model: MMC M52516 (sd/mmc)
Disk /dev/mmcblk0: 15.6GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: msdos
Disk Flags:

Number  Start   End     Size    Type     File system  Flags
 1      1049kB  525MB   524MB   primary  fat32
 2      525MB   15.6GB  15.1GB  primary  ext4
===================================================================================================
sudo fdisk -l
Disk /dev/mmcblk0: 14.6 GiB, 15636365312 bytes, 30539776 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x2a49bef6

Device         Boot   Start      End  Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/mmcblk0p1         2048  1026047  1024000  500M  b W95 FAT32
/dev/mmcblk0p2      1026048 30539564 29513517 14.1G 83 Linux


[so this is technically not a Pi, but a Pi clone, but I don't think lubuntu cares...at least that is my operating assumption...!]

Thanks!!!

Don
km4udx

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