Date   

Re: Web Server Using Postfix #networking

David Ranch <dranch@...>
 


Hello Don,

My email client will set up just fine using the local ip address for the server 192.168.1 using ports 110 and 25 ---- and there is not a problem sending and receiving emails.

Is the Raspberry Pi the email client or the email server?


However, if I use my full address, w9jun.ampr.org, the client will not set up. (no sending or receiving)

Are you saying that if you configure the email client to use the IP address vs. DNS name, that's the difference?  Or is the issue that one is the Internal IP address and the other is the external IP?


On the email client machine, what do the following commands give you?

   dig w9jun.ampr.org | grep w9jun.ampr.org

   dig w9jun.ampr.org mx | grep w9jun.ampr.org

I see the following:

   $ dig w9jun.ampr.org | grep w9jun.ampr.org
   ; <<>> DiG 9.8.2rc1-RedHat-9.8.2-0.68.rc1.el6_10.1 <<>> w9jun.ampr.org
   ;w9jun.ampr.org.                        IN      A
   w9jun.ampr.org.         3584    IN      A       44.48.210.1


   $ dig w9jun.ampr.org mx | grep w9jun.ampr.org
   ; <<>> DiG 9.8.2rc1-RedHat-9.8.2-0.68.rc1.el6_10.1 <<>> w9jun.ampr.org mx
   ;w9jun.ampr.org.                        IN      MX
   w9jun.ampr.org.         3600    IN      MX      5 w9jun.ampr.org.
   w9jun.ampr.org.         3578    IN      A       44.48.210.1



From my AMPR station, I can ping and connect to your host on ports 25 and 110:

   $ ping 44.48.210.1
   PING 44.48.210.1 (44.48.210.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
   64 bytes from 44.48.210.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=78.7 ms
   ^C
   --- 44.48.210.1 ping statistics ---
   1 packets transmitted, 1 received, 0% packet loss, time 0ms
   rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 78.757/78.757/78.757/0.000 ms

   $ telnet 44.48.210.1 25
   Trying 44.48.210.1...
   Connected to 44.48.210.1.
   Escape character is '^]'.
   220 w9jun.ampr.org ESMTP Postfix (Debian/GNU)
   ^]close

   $ telnet 44.48.210.1 110
   Trying 44.48.210.1...
   Connected to 44.48.210.1.
   Escape character is '^]'.
   +OK Qpopper (version 4.1.0) at w9jun.ampr.org starting.
   ^]close
   telnet> close

   $ telnet 44.48.210.1 465
   Trying 44.48.210.1...
   Connected to 44.48.210.1.
   Escape character is '^]'.
   220 w9jun.ampr.org ESMTP Postfix (Debian/GNU)
   ^]close


Can you also do those same tests to confirm you're getting DNS resolution and IP forwarding?


--David
KI6ZHD


Web Server Using Postfix #networking

Don - W9JUN
 

Looking for some guidance with my postfix mail server:

Here we go-----

My email client will set up just fine using the local ip address for the server 192.168.1 using ports 110 and 25 ---- and there is not a problem sending and receiving emails.
However, if I use my full address, w9jun.ampr.org, the client will not set up. (no sending or receiving)

Interestingly enough, if I test with JuiceSSH (on home network) I can connect to ports 110, and 465 but not 25

If I switch to data on my cell I can connect to 25, 465, and 110.

ideas?


Re: A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

Ronny Julian <k4rjjradio@...>
 

These guys do great work!  Best I've ever bought.  I bet they would add the RPi end of things to their inventory of "TNC Side" ends.  These guys will make up any combination needed.

On Wed, Jun 19, 2019 at 7:24 AM Brian Webster via Groups.Io <radiowebst=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Yes Bill that was my point, if his Pi project has a cable available to connect to the sound card and the header pin for the PTT control then users can buy cables such as these. The Pi project then only has to be concerned with making a cable that meets one of those standard connection methods and still able to be used with any radio.

Thank You,
Brian N2KGC


-----Original Message-----
From: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io [mailto:RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill Vodall
Sent: Tuesday, June 18, 2019 12:25 PM
To: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

> One suggestion may be to propose a more standard connection. There are a couple of popular connection methods, one is the mini DIN on the back of some radios, the other is the kantronics 9 pin connector method and the other is the older 5 pin DIN used in many of the older packet TNC’s. The idea being that if someone could make up a batch of cables that mate up to one or more of these methods, a user can normally find packet cables for their particular radio from various sources. I know you are probably not wanting to build and sell cables but documenting this could maybe assist others who could make one for this person or maybe if the project takes off someone will start to manufacture them for this device.

>>>

The cables are already available ...

  https://hammadeparts.com/shop-for-cables?olsPage=products







Re: A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

Guillermo/Bill
 

Excellent project! Could you expand on the PTT part a little bit? Wich GPIO pins do you use and how do you drive them? How about a basic schematics?

73 de PY2BIL


Re: Running a remote

Lewis Karriker
 


I also use Fldigi and Team Viewer with a pi 3+ - have had good results with contacts and remote control

Sonny - K4ARE

On 6/19/2019 10:55 AM, Daniel Holmes wrote:
I’ve done it. I gave my Dad a 3 that I’d installed Fldigi, Flrig, WSJT-X, a logger, etc on. Then I put on TeamViewer. After he got it all plugged in, I was able to connect in, then put in OpenVPN and VNC. I don’t use TeamViewer anymore, but have full control of his rig via the other programs. Works really well. I didn’t do it for me to operate his radio, it was more to be able to provide tech support, but it’ll accomplish the same goal. 

Dan

--
. Please pardon any mispelings or errors.


On Jun 19, 2019, at 7:22 AM, James Hertel <n6kmr@...> wrote:

Looking to run as a remote, with a Pi 3 for a friend, would there be any programs that you all are aware of that would allow a internet connection and operate a HF rig or even a TS 2000 with rig control etc.?

Have a fellow ham with restrictions ... so i can at least put him on the air here. I know you can do it with Microsoft but not wanting to run that on a large computer and since I have a Pi 3 available.... also we are solar here too.





Re: A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

James French <w8iss1@...>
 

How about using this arduino nano as a kiss tnc connected between your
radio and pi:

http://www.mobilinkd.com/2014/09/11/arduino-kiss-tnc/

They also sell pre-made radio cables also that could be used.

James W8ISS

Listen for N8M from the 10th Detroit Maker Faire July 27th and 28th


Re: Running a remote

Daniel Holmes
 

I’ve done it. I gave my Dad a 3 that I’d installed Fldigi, Flrig, WSJT-X, a logger, etc on. Then I put on TeamViewer. After he got it all plugged in, I was able to connect in, then put in OpenVPN and VNC. I don’t use TeamViewer anymore, but have full control of his rig via the other programs. Works really well. I didn’t do it for me to operate his radio, it was more to be able to provide tech support, but it’ll accomplish the same goal. 

Dan

--
. Please pardon any mispelings or errors.


On Jun 19, 2019, at 7:22 AM, James Hertel <n6kmr@...> wrote:

Looking to run as a remote, with a Pi 3 for a friend, would there be any programs that you all are aware of that would allow a internet connection and operate a HF rig or even a TS 2000 with rig control etc.?

Have a fellow ham with restrictions ... so i can at least put him on the air here. I know you can do it with Microsoft but not wanting to run that on a large computer and since I have a Pi 3 available.... also we are solar here too.





Re: Running a remote

Damon Schaefer
 

I know this isn't an audio solution, but I really love this FreeDV on the Pi. It's probably the best way to do FreeDV and a great way to get clean audio over HF:

I wonder if you could use it as an audio bridge for remote operations.
It still faces the same problem that the entire FreeDV project has: all of your buddies have to adopt FreeDV as well for you to be able to enjoy using it.

-Damon K9CQB


From: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io <RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io> on behalf of Steve McGrane <temporarilyoffline@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 19, 2019 10:05 AM
To: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] Running a remote
 
The Pi is great for digital modes and remote work... I'm listening intently for an audio solution.

Interesting to note is remotehamradio.com.  I have no affiliation, but after looking at a few youtube videos, this seems like it is very very well polished.

On Wed, Jun 19, 2019 at 9:02 AM Jonathan Magee <jmagee@...> wrote:
Hi James
I haven't done full remote operations. I do use a Pi3 for digital modes and can connect to it using VNC so I don't need to worry about getting audio fto/from the Pi3 over a network. (I haven't used it over the internet yet, just around the house using my android tablet)

I was thinking giving his instructions ago to see if I can get it to work from a PC in the house to the Pi3 in the shack

73 de Jonathan GI7KMC


On Wed, 19 Jun 2019 at 14:23, James Hertel <n6kmr@...> wrote:
Looking to run as a remote, with a Pi 3 for a friend, would there be any
programs that you all are aware of that would allow a internet
connection and operate a HF rig or even a TS 2000 with rig control etc.?

Have a fellow ham with restrictions ... so i can at least put him on the
air here. I know you can do it with Microsoft but not wanting to run
that on a large computer and since I have a Pi 3 available.... also we
are solar here too.





--
Damon A. Schaefer
K9CQB


Re: Running a remote

Steve McGrane <temporarilyoffline@...>
 

The Pi is great for digital modes and remote work... I'm listening intently for an audio solution.

Interesting to note is remotehamradio.com.  I have no affiliation, but after looking at a few youtube videos, this seems like it is very very well polished.


On Wed, Jun 19, 2019 at 9:02 AM Jonathan Magee <jmagee@...> wrote:
Hi James
I haven't done full remote operations. I do use a Pi3 for digital modes and can connect to it using VNC so I don't need to worry about getting audio fto/from the Pi3 over a network. (I haven't used it over the internet yet, just around the house using my android tablet)

I was thinking giving his instructions ago to see if I can get it to work from a PC in the house to the Pi3 in the shack

73 de Jonathan GI7KMC


On Wed, 19 Jun 2019 at 14:23, James Hertel <n6kmr@...> wrote:
Looking to run as a remote, with a Pi 3 for a friend, would there be any
programs that you all are aware of that would allow a internet
connection and operate a HF rig or even a TS 2000 with rig control etc.?

Have a fellow ham with restrictions ... so i can at least put him on the
air here. I know you can do it with Microsoft but not wanting to run
that on a large computer and since I have a Pi 3 available.... also we
are solar here too.





Re: Running a remote

Jonathan Magee
 

Hi James
I haven't done full remote operations. I do use a Pi3 for digital modes and can connect to it using VNC so I don't need to worry about getting audio fto/from the Pi3 over a network. (I haven't used it over the internet yet, just around the house using my android tablet)

I was thinking giving his instructions ago to see if I can get it to work from a PC in the house to the Pi3 in the shack

73 de Jonathan GI7KMC


On Wed, 19 Jun 2019 at 14:23, James Hertel <n6kmr@...> wrote:
Looking to run as a remote, with a Pi 3 for a friend, would there be any
programs that you all are aware of that would allow a internet
connection and operate a HF rig or even a TS 2000 with rig control etc.?

Have a fellow ham with restrictions ... so i can at least put him on the
air here. I know you can do it with Microsoft but not wanting to run
that on a large computer and since I have a Pi 3 available.... also we
are solar here too.





Running a remote

James Hertel
 

Looking to run as a remote, with a Pi 3 for a friend, would there be any programs that you all are aware of that would allow a internet connection and operate a HF rig or even a TS 2000 with rig control etc.?

Have a fellow ham with restrictions ... so i can at least put him on the air here. I know you can do it with Microsoft but not wanting to run that on a large computer and since I have a Pi 3 available.... also we are solar here too.


Re: A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

Brian Webster
 

Yes Bill that was my point, if his Pi project has a cable available to connect to the sound card and the header pin for the PTT control then users can buy cables such as these. The Pi project then only has to be concerned with making a cable that meets one of those standard connection methods and still able to be used with any radio.

Thank You,
Brian N2KGC

-----Original Message-----
From: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io [mailto:RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill Vodall
Sent: Tuesday, June 18, 2019 12:25 PM
To: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

One suggestion may be to propose a more standard connection. There are a couple of popular connection methods, one is the mini DIN on the back of some radios, the other is the kantronics 9 pin connector method and the other is the older 5 pin DIN used in many of the older packet TNC’s. The idea being that if someone could make up a batch of cables that mate up to one or more of these methods, a user can normally find packet cables for their particular radio from various sources. I know you are probably not wanting to build and sell cables but documenting this could maybe assist others who could make one for this person or maybe if the project takes off someone will start to manufacture them for this device.
The cables are already available ...

https://hammadeparts.com/shop-for-cables?olsPage=products


Re: A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

 

One suggestion may be to propose a more standard connection. There are a couple of popular connection methods, one is the mini DIN on the back of some radios, the other is the kantronics 9 pin connector method and the other is the older 5 pin DIN used in many of the older packet TNC’s. The idea being that if someone could make up a batch of cables that mate up to one or more of these methods, a user can normally find packet cables for their particular radio from various sources. I know you are probably not wanting to build and sell cables but documenting this could maybe assist others who could make one for this person or maybe if the project takes off someone will start to manufacture them for this device.
The cables are already available ...

https://hammadeparts.com/shop-for-cables?olsPage=products


Re: A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

 

Unless you switch to DRAWS™ 


On Tue, Jun 18, 2019, 06:02 Richard Bates <richard@...> wrote:
On Tue, Jun 18, 2019 at 08:45 AM, Ronny Julian wrote:
except for the soldering. 
I think it's unavoidable when using a general-purpose radio - to create the cables to go between the USB sound adapter & radio audio, and between the GPIO relay & radio PTT.

If you can spring for the Kenwood TH-D72A, then you can avoid this - this radio has a built-in TNC, so you can use an off-the-shelf USB cable (A-Male to Mini-B) between the RPi and radio.

Richard


Re: A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

Brian Webster
 

One suggestion may be to propose a more standard connection. There are a couple of popular connection methods, one is the mini DIN on the back of some radios, the other is the kantronics 9 pin connector method and the other is the older 5 pin DIN used in many of the older packet TNC’s. The idea being that if someone could make up a batch of cables that mate up to one or more of these methods, a user can normally find packet cables for their particular radio from various sources. I know you are probably not wanting to build and sell cables but documenting this could maybe assist others who could make one for this person or maybe if the project takes off someone will start to manufacture them for this device.

 

Thank You,

Brian N2KGC

 

From: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io [mailto:RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Bates
Sent: Tuesday, June 18, 2019 9:02 AM
To: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

 

On Tue, Jun 18, 2019 at 08:45 AM, Ronny Julian wrote:

except for the soldering. 

I think it's unavoidable when using a general-purpose radio - to create the cables to go between the USB sound adapter & radio audio, and between the GPIO relay & radio PTT.

If you can spring for the Kenwood TH-D72A, then you can avoid this - this radio has a built-in TNC, so you can use an off-the-shelf USB cable (A-Male to Mini-B) between the RPi and radio

Richard


Re: A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

Richard Bates
 

On Tue, Jun 18, 2019 at 08:45 AM, Ronny Julian wrote:
except for the soldering. 
I think it's unavoidable when using a general-purpose radio - to create the cables to go between the USB sound adapter & radio audio, and between the GPIO relay & radio PTT.

If you can spring for the Kenwood TH-D72A, then you can avoid this - this radio has a built-in TNC, so you can use an off-the-shelf USB cable (A-Male to Mini-B) between the RPi and radio.

Richard


Re: A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

Richard Bates
 

Brian

> .... disk image ..... user guide....

OK - I'll work on these two items in the next week - and post it here.

Richard 


Re: A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

Ronny Julian <k4rjjradio@...>
 

I like it except for the soldering.  Not exactly appliance compliant.  My vision will not let me do the soldering.

On Tue, Jun 18, 2019 at 8:40 AM Brian Webster via Groups.Io <radiowebst=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Richard,

                Great project! I am interested in this project very much. I have been wanting to find some sort of appliance device that we can get new hams on the air with packet who may have not been around years ago when it was more popular. Quite a few have tried APRS but most simple solution use VOX and don’t address the hardware PTT solution you have. I find even with hardware PTT solutions many of the Chinese radios don’t work well on connected packet due to the fact that the recovery time for the receiver after a transmit is too slow to receive ack packets from the other end of a link. That is just something where education addresses that problem. Do you have a disk image set up for the Pi to run this solution? Also do you have a user guide geared towards packet newbies to help set this up? We have a good functional packet network here in the Northeast US that we want to get more users active and train them what they can do on the network once connected https://www.eastnetpacket.org/

 

 

Thank You,

Brian N2KGC

 

From: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io [mailto:RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Bates
Sent: Tuesday, June 18, 2019 8:22 AM
To: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io
Subject: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

 

Described here is a simple portable packet station for emergency communications that can be used to connect to a packet node, to send & receive messages. 

The hardware consists of a 
Raspberry Pi (RPi), a USB Sound Adapter, a reed relay, a general-purpose radio, a smartphone and a battery. The Sound Adapter connects to the radio's microphone and speaker; one of the RPi GPIO pins connects to a reed relay whose contacts drive the radio PTT. This first figure shows the hardware, without the smartphone.

On boot up the RPi runs the Pat email client and Direwolf as a AX.25 packet modem/TNC, to interface with the radio; the RPi also operates as a hotspot, so the user connects to it with a smartphone web browser using WiFi, to operate Pat. 

 

This second figure shows the Pat web browser dialog on the smartphone, connecting from the portable station to a packet node, to send a message.

At the end of the session, the RPi can be safely powered down using an added push-button, as described here; thus the user does not need to issue any linux commands on the RPi.

 

Incidentally, the AnyTone AT-D868UV is attractive as an all-purpose emergency HT, as it can be programed to operate on analog amateur bands, as well as fire, police and ambulance service, marine and FRS/GMRS frequencies (This and the newer version, AT-D878UV, have beeen positively reviewed in the 11/2018 and 7/2019 issues of QST, respectively)

 

Please let me know if you would like more details about this project.

Richard


Re: A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

Brian Webster
 

Richard,

                Great project! I am interested in this project very much. I have been wanting to find some sort of appliance device that we can get new hams on the air with packet who may have not been around years ago when it was more popular. Quite a few have tried APRS but most simple solution use VOX and don’t address the hardware PTT solution you have. I find even with hardware PTT solutions many of the Chinese radios don’t work well on connected packet due to the fact that the recovery time for the receiver after a transmit is too slow to receive ack packets from the other end of a link. That is just something where education addresses that problem. Do you have a disk image set up for the Pi to run this solution? Also do you have a user guide geared towards packet newbies to help set this up? We have a good functional packet network here in the Northeast US that we want to get more users active and train them what they can do on the network once connected https://www.eastnetpacket.org/

 

 

Thank You,

Brian N2KGC

 

From: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io [mailto:RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Bates
Sent: Tuesday, June 18, 2019 8:22 AM
To: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io
Subject: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

 

Described here is a simple portable packet station for emergency communications that can be used to connect to a packet node, to send & receive messages. 

The hardware consists of a 
Raspberry Pi (RPi), a USB Sound Adapter, a reed relay, a general-purpose radio, a smartphone and a battery. The Sound Adapter connects to the radio's microphone and speaker; one of the RPi GPIO pins connects to a reed relay whose contacts drive the radio PTT. This first figure shows the hardware, without the smartphone.

On boot up the RPi runs the Pat email client and Direwolf as a AX.25 packet modem/TNC, to interface with the radio; the RPi also operates as a hotspot, so the user connects to it with a smartphone web browser using WiFi, to operate Pat. 

 

This second figure shows the Pat web browser dialog on the smartphone, connecting from the portable station to a packet node, to send a message.

At the end of the session, the RPi can be safely powered down using an added push-button, as described here; thus the user does not need to issue any linux commands on the RPi.

 

Incidentally, the AnyTone AT-D868UV is attractive as an all-purpose emergency HT, as it can be programed to operate on analog amateur bands, as well as fire, police and ambulance service, marine and FRS/GMRS frequencies (This and the newer version, AT-D878UV, have beeen positively reviewed in the 11/2018 and 7/2019 issues of QST, respectively)

 

Please let me know if you would like more details about this project.

Richard


A Simple Portable Packet Station for Emergency Communications

Richard Bates
 

Described here is a simple portable packet station for emergency communications that can be used to connect to a packet node, to send & receive messages. 

The hardware consists of a Raspberry Pi (RPi), a USB Sound Adapter, a reed relay, a general-purpose radio, a smartphone and a battery. The Sound Adapter connects to the radio's microphone and speaker; one of the RPi GPIO pins connects to a reed relay whose contacts drive the radio PTT. This first figure shows the hardware, without the smartphone.


On boot up the RPi runs the Pat email client and Direwolf as a AX.25 packet modem/TNC, to interface with the radio; the RPi also operates as a hotspot, so the user connects to it with a smartphone web browser using WiFi, to operate Pat. 
 
This second figure shows the Pat web browser dialog on the smartphone, connecting from the portable station to a packet node, to send a message.



At the end of the session, the RPi can be safely powered down using an added push-button, as described here; thus the user does not need to issue any linux commands on the RPi.
 
Incidentally, the AnyTone AT-D868UV is attractive as an all-purpose emergency HT, as it can be programed to operate on analog amateur bands, as well as fire, police and ambulance service, marine and FRS/GMRS frequencies. (This and the newer version, AT-D878UV, have beeen positively reviewed in the 11/2018 and 7/2019 issues of QST, respectively)
 
Please let me know if you would like more details about this project.

Richard