Date   

Re: Have lost my Davis VantageVue

g4sra
 

On 22/02/18 22:59, Al Massaro wrote:
....I ran your suggestion in the terminal window and it came back invalid option '/' "try ls --help".
....I would love to know what, or why I did not get a listing back, if I did something wrong or typed it in incorrectly.
You most likely typed

ls -lrt/dev

instead of

ls -lrt /dev


Re: R Pi and Alexa - for Amateur Radio

Steve, KB9MWR
 

I use the two-tone detect Pi image:
http://www.twotonedetect.net/twotonedetect-pi-image/
That is setup to spawn a recording that is then sent to google's API.


Re: Have lost my Davis VantageVue

 

Here's a starting point -- it's technical, but you can lock a USB to an ID  https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/66901/how-to-bind-usb-device-under-a-static-name

On Thu, Feb 22, 2018 at 1:23 PM, Michael Dunn <ml000-0013@...> wrote:
  Hi Al,

While I don't have WeeWx or a Davis weather station, I have a similar setup using rtl_433 to push weather to APRS.FI.  I would guess that the USB device you use to connect to the weather station has been re-enumerated.  Try this: unplug your connection to the USB weather device.  Then plug it back in and run 'ls -lrt /dev' on the Pi; one of the last devices in the output will likely be the USB device that you should configure in WeeWx.

  Cheers
  Mike




--


John D. Hays
Edmonds, WA
K7VE

   


Re: Have lost my Davis VantageVue

Al Massaro KF5SMH
 

I found that I was experiencing some router issues also while troubleshooting. I did a firmware upgrade on my router and I am now reporting to APRS, but just to try and learn something I ran your suggestion in the terminal window and it came back invalid option '/' "try ls --help". I did and it came back with a list of short argument options.
Thanks for the reply and help. I would love to know what, or why I did not get a listing back, if I did something wrong or typed it in incorrectly.
Thanks again
AL M
KF5SMH


Re: Have lost my Davis VantageVue

Michael Dunn
 

  Hi Al,

While I don't have WeeWx or a Davis weather station, I have a similar setup using rtl_433 to push weather to APRS.FI.  I would guess that the USB device you use to connect to the weather station has been re-enumerated.  Try this: unplug your connection to the USB weather device.  Then plug it back in and run 'ls -lrt /dev' on the Pi; one of the last devices in the output will likely be the USB device that you should configure in WeeWx.

  Cheers
  Mike


Have lost my Davis VantageVue

Al Massaro KF5SMH
 

I have an RPI 2b running DRATS, and WeeWx reporting to APRS.FI. I did some rearranging of the computer area and lost my upload to APRS. The Pi shows the bridge connection as bus001 device006. WeeWx shows that the usb port should be USB0 or USB1, the unit was working just fine up to the unplug. I have run the stop and start commands a number of times to no avail, I am not a LINUX wiz so not sure how to find problem, or what to do once I do. 
Somebody got a compass to point me in the right direction?
AL M
KF5SMH


Re: R Pi and Alexa - for Amateur Radio

Bill Diaz
 

Guys,
    I am experimenting with remote operating using 2 Echo Dots for audio,  with a Raspberry Pi running PiHpSDR and RealVNC, connected to an Apache Labs 100D. The remote end currently uses a Surface Pro 4 running RealVNC client.  Seems to work ok, but more testing needed.

    The Echo Dots use the Alexa "Drop in" feature to establish a two way audio connection.  The station end has the receiver speaker closely coupled to the Station Echo Dot, and the 3.5mm TRS output jack of the Dot is connected to the mic input of the 100D.  Latency appears to be somewhat variable, likely due to the load on the Amazon Servers.   Not perfect, but this should work with voice audio and any transceiver with external audio connection capability.

   Don't know if I can attach drawings here, but attached a drawing showing how it all works.

Bill KC9XG

On 2/22/2018 11:33 AM, Steve KB9MWR via Groups.Io wrote:
Back in 2012 I did some ham radio stuff with ASR (automatic speech recognition) at that time Alexa didn't exist that I know of, so I did it with Googles API.

http://kb9mwr.blogspot.com/2012/02/ham-radio-voice-recognition.html

I still have a Raspberry Pi that is listens for two-tone fire and EMS pages. And when that happens the next few seconds of audio are submitted to Googles ASR API and the transcript is logged to file and sent to me as a text message of the call.

Honestly I haven't looked into if there is an API for Alexa or if you have to use their hardware.




Re: R Pi and Alexa - for Amateur Radio

 

On Thu, Feb 22, 2018 at 10:09 AM, Kevin Elliott <kevin@...> wrote:
Steve,

> I still have a Raspberry Pi that is listens for two-tone fire and EMS pages.  And when that happens the next few seconds of audio are submitted to Googles ASR API and the transcript is logged to file and sent to me as a text message of the call.

How cool. Can you share implementation details for this? I’d love to set that up.

Kevin
KK6NHN





--


John D. Hays
Edmonds, WA
K7VE

   


Re: R Pi and Alexa - for Amateur Radio

Kevin Elliott
 

Steve,

I still have a Raspberry Pi that is listens for two-tone fire and EMS pages. And when that happens the next few seconds of audio are submitted to Googles ASR API and the transcript is logged to file and sent to me as a text message of the call.
How cool. Can you share implementation details for this? I’d love to set that up.

Kevin
KK6NHN


Re: R Pi and Alexa - for Amateur Radio

 

On Thu, Feb 22, 2018 at 9:33 AM, Steve KB9MWR via Groups.Io <kb9mwr@...> wrote:
Back in 2012 I did some ham radio stuff with ASR (automatic speech recognition)  at that time Alexa didn't exist that I know of, so I did it with Googles API.

http://kb9mwr.blogspot.com/2012/02/ham-radio-voice-recognition.html

I still have a Raspberry Pi that is listens for two-tone fire and EMS pages.  And when that happens the next few seconds of audio are submitted to Googles ASR API and the transcript is logged to file and sent to me as a text message of the call.

Honestly I haven't looked into if there is an API for Alexa or if you have to use their hardware.







--


John D. Hays
Edmonds, WA
K7VE

   


Re: R Pi and Alexa - for Amateur Radio

Steve, KB9MWR
 

Back in 2012 I did some ham radio stuff with ASR (automatic speech recognition) at that time Alexa didn't exist that I know of, so I did it with Googles API.

http://kb9mwr.blogspot.com/2012/02/ham-radio-voice-recognition.html

I still have a Raspberry Pi that is listens for two-tone fire and EMS pages. And when that happens the next few seconds of audio are submitted to Googles ASR API and the transcript is logged to file and sent to me as a text message of the call.

Honestly I haven't looked into if there is an API for Alexa or if you have to use their hardware.


Re: Will we see a Pi 4 in the near future...?

Steve McGrane <temporarilyoffline@...>
 

They're actually cheaper accounting for inflation ;-). I have a '66 in good running condition that I got for $5k.  You can find some "well worn" examples in the hundreds or even free if you look around a bit.

On Thu, Feb 22, 2018 at 10:01 AM, Lawrence Macionski via Groups.Io <am_fm_radio@...> wrote:
Can you still buy VW Beetles for 1967 $1995 prices??



Re: Will we see a Pi 4 in the near future...?

Larry Macionski
 

Can you still buy VW Beetles for 1967 $1995 prices??


Re: Will we see a Pi 4 in the near future...?

Terry Morris
 

I agree with John. Every time I hear someone complaining about the performance of the RPi or wanting to use it as a full sized and powered PC I feel obligated to give them a reality check. This PC was not designed to be used as your main computer, rather it was designed as a low cost platform for children to have access to so they could learn programming languages at a young age which may help future programmer needs. It's like the Willys Jeep and Volkswagen Beetle, small subtle changes were added to enhance the basic design as long as the price point can be kept near what it is now,


Re: Will we see a Pi 4 in the near future...?

Steve McGrane <temporarilyoffline@...>
 

There is an old saying:  You can be first or you can be best. 

I think that Pi runs on that "first" side of the equation.

They are pretty good, but have their shortcomings also.

Lots of other boards out there, but I "assume" that the Pi gets the most development because of its popularity.  Asus Tinker Board, oDroid, Pine, NUC... all have good features/some have better features.

On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 3:43 PM, w9ran <w9ran@...> wrote:
On 2/21/2018 1:38 PM, John D Hays - K7VE wrote:
Building a marginally 'better' board for a higher price, is a much smaller market.  There are several out there now.

True, and none of them have achieved even a small fraction of the success of the Pi, so I think the Foundation knows what it's doing, and has been a pretty good determinant of what "better" looks like.   Developers are well served by designs with longevity and stability, and having a wider range of proven 3rd party products is what most users want, so both groups should welcome this as good news as well.

Other SBC competitors like the Next Thing CHIP have disappointed their supporters with unreliable hardware and horrible support. The biggest problem with the Pi Zero is availability.     If you need something with higher performance the Odroid family seems to be a good choice.

I think the real diamonds are right under our feet, to borrow that analogy - the GPU in all Pi models offers untapped potential to developers and that's why the VC4CL project could really be a game-changer:  https://github.com/doe300/VC4CL

73, Bob W9RAN






Re: Will we see a Pi 4 in the near future...?

w9ran <w9ran@...>
 

On 2/21/2018 1:38 PM, John D Hays - K7VE wrote:
Building a marginally 'better' board for a higher price, is a much smaller market.  There are several out there now.
True, and none of them have achieved even a small fraction of the success of the Pi, so I think the Foundation knows what it's doing, and has been a pretty good determinant of what "better" looks like.   Developers are well served by designs with longevity and stability, and having a wider range of proven 3rd party products is what most users want, so both groups should welcome this as good news as well.

Other SBC competitors like the Next Thing CHIP have disappointed their supporters with unreliable hardware and horrible support. The biggest problem with the Pi Zero is availability.     If you need something with higher performance the Odroid family seems to be a good choice.

I think the real diamonds are right under our feet, to borrow that analogy - the GPU in all Pi models offers untapped potential to developers and that's why the VC4CL project could really be a game-changer:  https://github.com/doe300/VC4CL

73, Bob W9RAN


Re: Will we see a Pi 4 in the near future...?

Detrick Merz <detrick@...>
 

My requirements are ethernet (possibly wifi additionally), usb for a sound card, and low cost, so that knocks the Zeros out (sure, I could get a USB ethernet adapter, hub, etc., but then things start getting annoying). A Pi 3 would be fine, but a B or B+ for cheaper would be just as good.

The ZeroW was absolutely perfect for the Field Day logger, though. It performed beyond my expectations.

-detrick
K4IZ


On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 3:04 PM, Randy Hall <ku9cor@...> wrote:
Generally speaking, this is the niche in which the Pi Zero and Pi Zero W dominate. If you're looking for network-capable, 512MB memory and low (by Raspberry Pi standards) power, the Zeroes are the platform you should be looking at.

If you need USB and/or network with lower power requirements, then you are better off just doing a Pi 3 and underclocking it to control performance/temperature/power use.

And, of course, for higher performance, there are plenty of competition, though none have the community of the Pi.

--R


On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 11:45 AM, Detrick Merz <detrick@...> wrote:
The price/perfomance at $35 for a Pi 3 is sufficient (or exceeds) the needs of the users of the Raspberry Pi.

There is great truth to this. I keep my eyes open for original Pi B models, because I have a need for more of them and they're completely sufficient for my needs. One day I hope to find a cache of them for even cheaper than new. As many as there are out there, surely some folks bought more than they need, bought for novelty, or need newer models for one reason or another. But perhaps the fact that I don't find much in the used market means they're either cheap enough to be disposable, or have a much more useful lifespan than we might think.

-detrick
K4IZ

On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 2:38 PM, John D Hays - K7VE <john@...> wrote:
The price/perfomance at $35 for a Pi 3 is sufficient (or exceeds) the needs of the users of the Raspberry Pi.  Building a marginally 'better' board for a higher price, is a much smaller market.  There are several out there now.

For embedded builds, eg. something attached to the GPIO system, 100% compatibility is a requirement.  Some of the competitors fail to meet 100% compatibility with pins on the GPIO.

Remember, this was originally designed as "in classroom" teaching tool, it has been wildly more successful than expected.  The Raspberry Pi Foundation is not in it for the profit.

They are focused on improving software tools for the current time being, and that's fine.

On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 11:19 AM, Max via Groups.Io <kg4pid@...> wrote:
They must not be needing money or they would be bringing out a newer model sooner. Or they have built too many of the previous models and are trying to reduce their stock. They don't have much competition in their performance/price/support range. All the others lack in one or more of these areas.

If they can sell the Pi3 for $35, imagine what they could build for $60 or $70!  

Max KG4PID

--


John D. Hays
Edmonds, WA
K7VE

   





Re: Will we see a Pi 4 in the near future...?

Randy Hall <ku9cor@...>
 

Generally speaking, this is the niche in which the Pi Zero and Pi Zero W dominate. If you're looking for network-capable, 512MB memory and low (by Raspberry Pi standards) power, the Zeroes are the platform you should be looking at.

If you need USB and/or network with lower power requirements, then you are better off just doing a Pi 3 and underclocking it to control performance/temperature/power use.

And, of course, for higher performance, there are plenty of competition, though none have the community of the Pi.

--R


On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 11:45 AM, Detrick Merz <detrick@...> wrote:
The price/perfomance at $35 for a Pi 3 is sufficient (or exceeds) the needs of the users of the Raspberry Pi.

There is great truth to this. I keep my eyes open for original Pi B models, because I have a need for more of them and they're completely sufficient for my needs. One day I hope to find a cache of them for even cheaper than new. As many as there are out there, surely some folks bought more than they need, bought for novelty, or need newer models for one reason or another. But perhaps the fact that I don't find much in the used market means they're either cheap enough to be disposable, or have a much more useful lifespan than we might think.

-detrick
K4IZ

On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 2:38 PM, John D Hays - K7VE <john@...> wrote:
The price/perfomance at $35 for a Pi 3 is sufficient (or exceeds) the needs of the users of the Raspberry Pi.  Building a marginally 'better' board for a higher price, is a much smaller market.  There are several out there now.

For embedded builds, eg. something attached to the GPIO system, 100% compatibility is a requirement.  Some of the competitors fail to meet 100% compatibility with pins on the GPIO.

Remember, this was originally designed as "in classroom" teaching tool, it has been wildly more successful than expected.  The Raspberry Pi Foundation is not in it for the profit.

They are focused on improving software tools for the current time being, and that's fine.

On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 11:19 AM, Max via Groups.Io <kg4pid@...> wrote:
They must not be needing money or they would be bringing out a newer model sooner. Or they have built too many of the previous models and are trying to reduce their stock. They don't have much competition in their performance/price/support range. All the others lack in one or more of these areas.

If they can sell the Pi3 for $35, imagine what they could build for $60 or $70!  

Max KG4PID

--


John D. Hays
Edmonds, WA
K7VE

   




Re: Will we see a Pi 4 in the near future...?

Detrick Merz <detrick@...>
 

The price/perfomance at $35 for a Pi 3 is sufficient (or exceeds) the needs of the users of the Raspberry Pi.

There is great truth to this. I keep my eyes open for original Pi B models, because I have a need for more of them and they're completely sufficient for my needs. One day I hope to find a cache of them for even cheaper than new. As many as there are out there, surely some folks bought more than they need, bought for novelty, or need newer models for one reason or another. But perhaps the fact that I don't find much in the used market means they're either cheap enough to be disposable, or have a much more useful lifespan than we might think.

-detrick
K4IZ

On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 2:38 PM, John D Hays - K7VE <john@...> wrote:
The price/perfomance at $35 for a Pi 3 is sufficient (or exceeds) the needs of the users of the Raspberry Pi.  Building a marginally 'better' board for a higher price, is a much smaller market.  There are several out there now.

For embedded builds, eg. something attached to the GPIO system, 100% compatibility is a requirement.  Some of the competitors fail to meet 100% compatibility with pins on the GPIO.

Remember, this was originally designed as "in classroom" teaching tool, it has been wildly more successful than expected.  The Raspberry Pi Foundation is not in it for the profit.

They are focused on improving software tools for the current time being, and that's fine.

On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 11:19 AM, Max via Groups.Io <kg4pid@...> wrote:
They must not be needing money or they would be bringing out a newer model sooner. Or they have built too many of the previous models and are trying to reduce their stock. They don't have much competition in their performance/price/support range. All the others lack in one or more of these areas.

If they can sell the Pi3 for $35, imagine what they could build for $60 or $70!  

Max KG4PID

--


John D. Hays
Edmonds, WA
K7VE

   



Re: Will we see a Pi 4 in the near future...?

 

The price/perfomance at $35 for a Pi 3 is sufficient (or exceeds) the needs of the users of the Raspberry Pi.  Building a marginally 'better' board for a higher price, is a much smaller market.  There are several out there now.

For embedded builds, eg. something attached to the GPIO system, 100% compatibility is a requirement.  Some of the competitors fail to meet 100% compatibility with pins on the GPIO.

Remember, this was originally designed as "in classroom" teaching tool, it has been wildly more successful than expected.  The Raspberry Pi Foundation is not in it for the profit.

They are focused on improving software tools for the current time being, and that's fine.

On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 11:19 AM, Max via Groups.Io <kg4pid@...> wrote:
They must not be needing money or they would be bringing out a newer model sooner. Or they have built too many of the previous models and are trying to reduce their stock. They don't have much competition in their performance/price/support range. All the others lack in one or more of these areas.

If they can sell the Pi3 for $35, imagine what they could build for $60 or $70!  

Max KG4PID

--


John D. Hays
Edmonds, WA
K7VE

   

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