Date   

Re: My Raspberry Pi project

Max
 

I just found this a few hours ago but have not tried it yet. I hope it works as advertised.


Max KG4PID


From: "Don Ritchie dritchie@... [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO]"
To: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@...
Sent: Friday, June 23, 2017 1:59 AM
Subject: Re: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] My Raspberry Pi project

 
Boy, did I bite off more then I can chew !!!

I am soooo lost, I 'THOUGHT  controlling  GPIO pins on Pi 2 from Pi 1 would be a walk in the park.
Was I ever wrong ...
I didn't KNOW that there were so many different "types" of GPIO configs,
Which pins to use for what ?
I only need to control 2 pins  PTT and Channel.
Right now, just to keep it simple, I'll be happy with just PTT.
I have no idea which one to use  ?
Ground GPIO pin 19 on Pi "local" and make pin 19 on Pi "remote" go "hi".
That would be great for starters.
Thanks

Don K8ZGW




On 6/22/2017 11:47 AM, k1bdx.craig@... [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] wrote:
 

If your pi's are set up as IRLP nodes then...

Ispeaker already puts 3.3 volts out on pin 11  of the pi for keying the transmitter whenever voice packets are being received from the internet.

imike looks for  pin 19 to be grounded and then it starts sending voice packets to the other pi (at whatever IP address you tell it). this is the pin you would hook up a ptt switch.

There are two binary programs called "aux1on"  and  "aux1off" that are already set up and included with the IRLP software to activate a relay on the far end to change channels on your radio.

 have you seen the IRLP tutorial?  It might help

 

Craig
K1BDX








Re: My Raspberry Pi project

David Ranch <dranch@...>
 

Hello Don,

 

I don't understand your comment about "not enough details" ?
I am not a software guy, so I am looking to put together what others may have done
into a package that will do what I need.

That's fair though I'd argue the hard part here is the software piece  :-)


REMOTE RADIO~ The GPIO scripts for both PTT and channel change ( it is just a 2 channel radio)

Ok.. this isn't hard and there are lots of examples out there.  Start simple with say a shell script to confirm the functionality works with your GPIO transistor circuit for say PTT.  For example

   http://elafargue.github.io/aprs-box/hardware/

There are lots of other designs out there (some with double FET transistors, 555 timers for max TX limiters, etc) but I recommend to start simple.  Next, use a shell script to initialize your chosen GPIO pin as an OUTPUT and make sure you can key up your radio through the transistor circuit:

   http://wiringpi.com/the-gpio-utility/



AUDIO ~ We know a bit about VoIP, have been doing it for years for remote monitoring of radios.
we were using old ATA's, but needed a "server" to connect them to each-other. I want to avoid that.

Ok, I assumed your "server" was running Asterisk or some other VoIP software.  Very powerful, possibly overkill.


Understand G-711 sounds good, but could use G-729 for smaller UDP packets.

Ok.. yes, you're exactly right.  There are many other options out there but I didn't want to over-complicate the email response.  Even G.729 is old compared to say mp3, Ogg, Opus, etc.  The choice is yours based on what your needs are.


I guess where I am really stuck is in the connecting "together", they are now both running
"headless" on my local network, and I can connect them to each-other with SSH.
From my Windoz machine I "puddy" into Pi # 1 ( which I call 'local")
then I can SSH into # 2.( which I call 'remote')
When I can get this to work on my network, it will be moved 50 miles away to my buddy's QTH
about 50 miles awav, and connected via the internet.

I'm just not sure if SSH is the "answer".

SSH is a powerful tool that can do anything.  Not only does it give you a terminal to manage your Raspberry Pis but it can forward Xwindows GUI traffic but also offer port forwards to send traffic through a secure channel, etc.


How do I get # 1 to send anything to # 2 ?
It looks like I may use imic and Ispeaker , but still not sure ??

I would assume that when both the "local" and "remote" Raspberry PIs to start this service upon boot.  You also previously mentioned that you want to write all this in Python or do you really care what the language is?  Shell scripting is easy where you can call external programs like imic/ispeaker but shell scripts can slow at times.  Python can be much faster if you develop the program using Python libraries that you "include" into it.  If it were me, I would start with the shell script and start simple with programs that you know work (like ispeaker/imic).  Once you have the basis, you can optimize, maybe play with something new (python,) etc.

To get started, I'd recommend to create an "outline" of the logic you want the program to follow (called pseduocode).  There are MANY ways to approach this and this is just one idea.  I'll openly admit I'm not a software developer so there might be better approaches (maybe others here on the list can chime in that ARE developers):

local:

   - start of program
   - listen to PTT GPIO pin
      - If PTT GPIO goes high
         - start Imic program with required parameters for correct sound card input, etc in the background (using "&") into STDOUT (using "-')
          - send resulting data stream out on the network on say UDP port 5555 using something like netcat (called "nc")
      - If PTT GPIO goes low
         - kill the imic process (which will also terminate the netcat process)
   - sleep 1 second to minimize CPU load
   - loop to beginning of script


remote:

   - start of program
   - start netcat receiver program on UDP port 5555 sending and data to ispeaker
   - loop program


There are a LOT of security concerns (no abuse protection from the internet, no authentication, etc) with this approach but this will give you a starting point.


--David
KI6ZHD


Re: My Raspberry Pi project

Don Ritchie
 

Boy, did I bite off more then I can chew !!!

I am soooo lost, I 'THOUGHT  controlling  GPIO pins on Pi 2 from Pi 1 would be a walk in the park.
Was I ever wrong ...
I didn't KNOW that there were so many different "types" of GPIO configs,
Which pins to use for what ?
I only need to control 2 pins  PTT and Channel.
Right now, just to keep it simple, I'll be happy with just PTT.
I have no idea which one to use  ?
Ground GPIO pin 19 on Pi "local" and make pin 19 on Pi "remote" go "hi".
That would be great for starters.
Thanks

Don K8ZGW




On 6/22/2017 11:47 AM, k1bdx.craig@... [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] wrote:
 

If your pi's are set up as IRLP nodes then...

Ispeaker already puts 3.3 volts out on pin 11  of the pi for keying the transmitter whenever voice packets are being received from the internet.

imike looks for  pin 19 to be grounded and then it starts sending voice packets to the other pi (at whatever IP address you tell it). this is the pin you would hook up a ptt switch.

There are two binary programs called "aux1on"  and  "aux1off" that are already set up and included with the IRLP software to activate a relay on the far end to change channels on your radio.

 have you seen the IRLP tutorial?  It might help

 

Craig
K1BDX






Re: My Raspberry Pi project

Craig Davidson
 


If your pi's are set up as IRLP nodes then...

Ispeaker already puts 3.3 volts out on pin 11  of the pi for keying the transmitter whenever voice packets are being received from the internet.

imike looks for  pin 19 to be grounded and then it starts sending voice packets to the other pi (at whatever IP address you tell it). this is the pin you would hook up a ptt switch.

There are two binary programs called "aux1on"  and  "aux1off" that are already set up and included with the IRLP software to activate a relay on the far end to change channels on your radio.

 have you seen the IRLP tutorial?  It might help

 

Craig
K1BDX





Re: My Raspberry Pi project

Don Ritchie
 

David,

Thanks for the reply,

I don't understand your comment about "not enough details" ?
I am not a software guy, so I am looking to put together what others may have done
into a package that will do what I need.

REMOTE RADIO~ The GPIO scripts for both PTT and channel change ( it is just a 2 channel radio).

AUDIO ~ We know a bit about VoIP, have been doing it for years for remote monitoring of radios.
we were using old ATA's, but needed a "server" to connect them to each-other. I want to avoid that.

Understand G-711 sounds good, but could use G-729 for smaller UDP packets.

I guess where I am really stuck is in the connecting "together", they are now both running
"headless" on my local network, and I can connect them to each-other with SSH.
From my Windoz machine I "puddy" into Pi # 1 ( which I call 'local")
then I can SSH into # 2.( which I call 'remote')
When I can get this to work on my network, it will be moved 50 miles away to my buddy's QTH
about 50 miles awav, and connected via the internet.

I'm just not sure if SSH is the "answer".
How do I get # 1 to send anything to # 2 ?
It looks like I may use imic and Ispeaker , but still not sure ??

I know I still need to do a lot of work to get this to work the way I need it to work.

Thanks

Don

On 6/21/2017 10:52 AM, David Ranch dranch@... [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] wrote:

Hello Don,

Your project idea is definitely possible but you don't mention enough details.  Are you wanting to write all the software yourself or use an existing project?  Programs like Svxlink support the Raspberry Pi for general repeater and optional Echolink functionality.  There is also the IRLP program and network that will work as well.

If writing your own software, where are you getting stuck? 

PTT control:
There are many shell, python, Perl, and other language examples to initialize the GPIO pins.  If you really want to use relays (not required), you'll need to use a simple transistor circuit to drive the PTT line as the Raspberry Pi's pins alone cannot handle that much current.

VoIP transport:
This is a deep area so I would recommend to take in small slices but shouldn't be too complicated.  I would start with recording audio on one Raspberry Pi, encode into a codec like G.711 (64Kbps - old but good sounding or something new like Opus or OGG.  Then sending this data stream over a network connection would most likely be over UDP.  The network transport could be done via existing tools like "socat" or you can choose to write native routines in your chosen programming language.  If this project would be connected to the Internet, don't underestimate what poor security can do to both your Raspberry Pi's and the Internet.  Make sure your IoT devices have proper firewalls configured, the network connections use best practices authentication, sanitize all the input to avoid things like buffer overflows, etc.


Anyway, that's all a start for now.  We need more information from you to understand where we need to point you next.

--David
KI6ZHD



Re: Mobile Pi

Ronny Julian <k4rjjradio@...>
 

John I am saving my $$ for your Radio board you dropped news of on HRN at Dayton.  When is that going to go live on Kickstarter?  I want to be ready for it so could you give this group a days notice?

Thanks!
Ronny
K4RJJ


On Mon, Jun 19, 2017 at 9:40 PM, 'John D. Hays' john@... [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] <Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@...> wrote:
 

Michael if you used a UDRC II instead, it has a built in 12v to 5v circuit to power it all and you could hook two radios 1 at 1200 baud and another at 9600 if you like. 



Re: RPi 3 7" touchscreen overscan with WSJT-X KI7MT distribution

Marty Boroff
 

If the page is blank you made an error typing the command. You should see lot's of info and any line beginning with a # is a comment line. Remove the # and the line will be processed.

73, Marty WD9GYM


On Wednesday, June 21, 2017 6:33 PM, "k7tp@... [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO]" wrote:


 
Interesting. There is nothing in my \boot\config.txt

pi3 jessie  and an official Raspi 7" touchscreen.

Grover K7TP



Re: Mobile Pi

Michael <barnes9443@...>
 

'John D. Hays' john@hays.org [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] wrote on
06/19/2017 06:40 PM:
Michael if you used a UDRC II instead, it has a built in 12v to 5v
circuit to power it all and you could hook two radios 1 at 1200 baud and
another at 9600 if you like.
Perhaps. However, I already have the tnc-pi on hand and no need to
connect to two radios. Also, no extra $100 to acquire a UDRC II.

Thanks for the suggestion. It looks like an interesting item.

Michael WA7SKG


Re: RPi 3 7" touchscreen overscan with WSJT-X KI7MT distribution,

Max
 

Is there just an empty file? There is a lot of stuff in mine, mostly the defaults with just a few changes.

I would be thinking about downloading the image again, no tellin' what else your missing.

Max KG4PID


From: "k7tp@... [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO]"
To: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@...
Sent: Wednesday, June 21, 2017 6:33 PM
Subject: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Re: RPi 3 7" touchscreen overscan with WSJT-X KI7MT distribution

 
Interesting. There is nothing in my \boot\config.txt

pi3 jessie  and an official Raspi 7" touchscreen.

Grover K7TP



Re: RPi 3 7" touchscreen overscan with WSJT-X KI7MT distribution

Grover Cleveland
 

Interesting. There is nothing in my \boot\config.txt

pi3 jessie  and an official Raspi 7" touchscreen.

Grover K7TP


Re: My Raspberry Pi project

David Ranch <dranch@...>
 


Hello Don,

Your project idea is definitely possible but you don't mention enough details.  Are you wanting to write all the software yourself or use an existing project?  Programs like Svxlink support the Raspberry Pi for general repeater and optional Echolink functionality.  There is also the IRLP program and network that will work as well.

If writing your own software, where are you getting stuck? 

PTT control:
There are many shell, python, Perl, and other language examples to initialize the GPIO pins.  If you really want to use relays (not required), you'll need to use a simple transistor circuit to drive the PTT line as the Raspberry Pi's pins alone cannot handle that much current.

VoIP transport:
This is a deep area so I would recommend to take in small slices but shouldn't be too complicated.  I would start with recording audio on one Raspberry Pi, encode into a codec like G.711 (64Kbps - old but good sounding or something new like Opus or OGG.  Then sending this data stream over a network connection would most likely be over UDP.  The network transport could be done via existing tools like "socat" or you can choose to write native routines in your chosen programming language.  If this project would be connected to the Internet, don't underestimate what poor security can do to both your Raspberry Pi's and the Internet.  Make sure your IoT devices have proper firewalls configured, the network connections use best practices authentication, sanitize all the input to avoid things like buffer overflows, etc.


Anyway, that's all a start for now.  We need more information from you to understand where we need to point you next.

--David
KI6ZHD




On 06/19/2017 05:46 AM, Don Ritchie dritchie@... [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] wrote:
 

I am going to try this once more.
My Raspberry Pi project is:

TWO R-Pi's connected "back to back", first on my own network
( for testing),
and later one moved to another location,via the internet.

The project is to remote control an amateur radio.

I have two R Pi 3's both with usb "sound card" dongles.
The Pi at the local end will have a Microphone with a Push
to talk switch and a SPST
toggle switch, which will control the channel.
The Pi that will be at the remote end has a two relay
module, that I need to control
via the the GPIO pins One for Push to talk while the other
will be used to control the channel.

The need,
To send (almost) real time audio across network,via the
"sound dongles".
To be able to control the relays at the "remote" end from
the "local" end.

The how ?
The way I see it,

At the local end -
The PTT switch will send ground ( or voltage) to a GPIO
pin ( thru a resistor)
The toggle switch will send voltage (or ground) to a GPIO
pin ( thru a resistor).

At the remote end -
The GPIO that is activated by the PTT switch will operate
relay one, as long as the PTT is closed.
The GPIO that is activated by the toggle switch will operate
relay two, as long as the toggle switch is closed.

This "seems" simple to me, EXCEPT I can't figure out the
programing -
I have looked at any number of python tutorials and am
unable to get it thru my head . . ( I'm old)

The audio is about as confusing, it seems that no one has
tried to talk from one Pi to another Pi ??

There are any number of devices to do this, but none at any
price point I can afford.
I am already close to my limit in $$$,
while the cheapest "commercial" ROiP ( Radio over Internet
Protocol) device
Is more then one and a half times what I already have
invested.( and I would need two of them.)

Thanks

Don, K8ZGW



Re: My Raspberry Pi project

 

Don,
There are many schemes listed on Google for doing audio between devices over a TCP/IP network. And I’ve seen a TI demo-board that did it between two of their CPU boards. I don’t know if the scheme is portable to the Raspberry PI.
Another way to do this is to send the audio over ham radios between the two Raspberry PIs. Use 2m rigs or something. Generally speaking you only need one audio direction at a time and the Raspberry PIs can negotiate over your socket level connects as to which one is going to be transmitting on 2m and which is receiving. This adds a touch of genuine-ness to the ham radio operation because then at least your audio is entirely over the air. Obviously there are some range limitations on this plan but it will still be fun to get working. Don’t forget to eventually add a periodic morse ID to the receive side path before you deploy THIS solution. If you had to, you could send the morse code by keying and unkeying the FM rigs.
Tadd


Re: My Raspberry Pi project

kb9mwr@...
 

I have done and been doing almost exactly what you are seeking to do.  It's basically the same thing the IRLP on a Pi nodes do.  Except I wanted to do it off network.

I suggest looking into speakfreely to stream the audio, you can grab the precompiled binaries here:

The imike and ispeaker binaries for an ARM processor:
ftp://ftp.irlp.net/pub/irlpv2.0/Bin_ARM.tgz

To stream audio there are two tools.  imike and ispeaker.  They work like you think.  

ispeaker enables you to listen for remote audio streams directed to you.  If you are using a non-standard port, it must be specified.


imike with a IP address/hostname enables sending your radios audio to that remote person.  Again we are using a non-standard port, and -N for not compressed, this sounds better.

Once you have ispeaker and imike running like below, when you key your HT, your mobile radio interfaced to your pi will send the audio to the remote station.  They need to be running an instance of ispeaker (obviously) to hear and re-transmit you.

/root/start.sh example:

# Start ispeaker on a different port, force to the background,
# and start imike streaming to Bob.
#
/root/ispeaker -P6789 &
#
/root/imike -N -P hostname.net:6789

You might as well just use the key and unkey IRLP binaries. GPIO17 is PTT, and GPIO19 is COR (active low).. Else I use the wiring pi GPIO library to toggle stuff often for other projects.

 


Re: Mobile Pi

 

Michael if you used a UDRC II instead, it has a built in 12v to 5v circuit to power it all and you could hook two radios 1 at 1200 baud and another at 9600 if you like. 


Re: My Raspberry Pi project

Craig Davidson
 

I have done this with IRLP nodes.  Are you familiar with IRLP?  If you are willing to go that route, I'll be glad to show how I did it. 

We hang out on an experimental IRLP conference reflector. (the number is 0070) You are welcome to connect over there and talk to us about it.

Also there is more info about our group at 


Let me know if you have any questions.

Craig
K1BDX


Re: My Raspberry Pi project

Craig Davidson
 


I have done this with IRLP nodes.  Are you familiar with IRLP?  If you are willing to go that route, I'll be glad to show how I did it.

We hang out on an experimental IRLP conference reflector. (the number is 0070) You are welcome to connect over there and talk to us about it.

Also there is more info about our group at 


Let me know if you have any questions.

Craig
K1BDX



On Mon, Jun 19, 2017 at 7:46 AM, Don Ritchie dritchie@... [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] <Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@...> wrote:
 

I am going to try this once more.
My Raspberry Pi project is:

TWO R-Pi's connected "back to back", first on my own network
( for testing),
and later one moved to another location,via the internet.

The project is to remote control an amateur radio.

I have two R Pi 3's both with usb "sound card" dongles.
The Pi at the local end will have a Microphone with a Push
to talk switch and a SPST
toggle switch, which will control the channel.
The Pi that will be at the remote end has a two relay
module, that I need to control
via the the GPIO pins One for Push to talk while the other
will be used to control the channel.

The need,
To send (almost) real time audio across network,via the
"sound dongles".
To be able to control the relays at the "remote" end from
the "local" end.

The how ?
The way I see it,

At the local end -
The PTT switch will send ground ( or voltage) to a GPIO
pin ( thru a resistor)
The toggle switch will send voltage (or ground) to a GPIO
pin ( thru a resistor).

At the remote end -
The GPIO that is activated by the PTT switch will operate
relay one, as long as the PTT is closed.
The GPIO that is activated by the toggle switch will operate
relay two, as long as the toggle switch is closed.

This "seems" simple to me, EXCEPT I can't figure out the
programing -
I have looked at any number of python tutorials and am
unable to get it thru my head . . ( I'm old)

The audio is about as confusing, it seems that no one has
tried to talk from one Pi to another Pi ??

There are any number of devices to do this, but none at any
price point I can afford.
I am already close to my limit in $$$,
while the cheapest "commercial" ROiP ( Radio over Internet
Protocol) device
Is more then one and a half times what I already have
invested.( and I would need two of them.)

Thanks

Don, K8ZGW



My Raspberry Pi project

Don Ritchie
 

I am going to try this once more.
My Raspberry Pi project is:


TWO R-Pi's connected "back to back", first on my own network
( for testing),
and later one moved to another location,via the internet.


The project is to remote control an amateur radio.


I have two R Pi 3's both with usb "sound card" dongles.
The Pi at the local end will have a Microphone with a Push
to talk switch and a SPST
toggle switch, which will control the channel.
The Pi that will be at the remote end has a two relay
module, that I need to control
via the the GPIO pins One for Push to talk while the other
will be used to control the channel.


The need,
To send (almost) real time audio across network,via the
"sound dongles".
To be able to control the relays at the "remote" end from
the "local" end.


The how ?
The way I see it,


At the local end -
The PTT switch will send ground ( or voltage) to a GPIO
pin ( thru a resistor)
The toggle switch will send voltage (or ground) to a GPIO
pin ( thru a resistor).


At the remote end -
The GPIO that is activated by the PTT switch will operate
relay one, as long as the PTT is closed.
The GPIO that is activated by the toggle switch will operate
relay two, as long as the toggle switch is closed.


This "seems" simple to me, EXCEPT I can't figure out the
programing -
I have looked at any number of python tutorials and am
unable to get it thru my head . . ( I'm old)


The audio is about as confusing, it seems that no one has
tried to talk from one Pi to another Pi ??


There are any number of devices to do this, but none at any
price point I can afford.
I am already close to my limit in $$$,
while the cheapest "commercial" ROiP ( Radio over Internet
Protocol) device
Is more then one and a half times what I already have
invested.( and I would need two of them.)


Thanks


Don, K8ZGW


My Raspberry Pi project

Don Ritchie
 

I am going to try this once more.
My Raspberry Pi project is:


TWO R-Pi's connected "back to back", first on my own network
( for testing),
and later one moved to another location,via the internet.


The project is to remote control an amateur radio.


I have two R Pi 3's both with usb "sound card" dongles.
The Pi at the local end will have a Microphone with a Push
to talk switch and a SPST
toggle switch, which will control the channel.
The Pi that will be at the remote end has a two relay
module, that I need to control
via the the GPIO pins One for Push to talk while the other
will be used to control the channel.


The need,
To send (almost) real time audio across network,via the
"sound dongles".
To be able to control the relays at the "remote" end from
the "local" end.


The how ?
The way I see it,


At the local end -
The PTT switch will send ground ( or voltage) to a GPIO
pin ( thru a resistor)
The toggle switch will send voltage (or ground) to a GPIO
pin ( thru a resistor).


At the remote end -
The GPIO that is activated by the PTT switch will operate
relay one, as long as the PTT is closed.
The GPIO that is activated by the toggle switch will operate
relay two, as long as the toggle switch is closed.


This "seems" simple to me, EXCEPT I can't figure out the
programing -
I have looked at any number of python tutorials and am
unable to get it thru my head . . ( I'm old)


The audio is about as confusing, it seems that no one has
tried to talk from one Pi to another Pi ??


There are any number of devices to do this, but none at any
price point I can afford.
I am already close to my limit in $$$,
while the cheapest "commercial" ROiP ( Radio over Internet
Protocol) device
Is more then one and a half times what I already have
invested.( and I would need two of them.)


Thanks


Don, K8ZGW


Re: Mobile Pi

Marty Boroff
 

Michael

I got this on Amazon 
DROK 090605 DC-DC Buck Voltage step down. Search it. For some reason I can't get a lik on my iPhone using the Amazon app. I tried a few different ones on eBay and they failed. I would get the lightening bolt on the display.

Take a look at Hobbypcb.com for a write up on their aprs station. Also look up N9SIR's web. Page for an image for pi.

73, Marty WD9GYM 



On Sunday, June 18, 2017, 11:09 PM, Michael barnes9443@... [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] wrote:

 

I'm putting together an APRS package for mobile use and will be using a
Raspberry Pi. What would the best way to power this beast be? I'll be
using a tnc-pi and 7" touchscreen. Thanks.

73,

Michael WA7SKG


Re: Mobile Pi

Ivan Horan
 

Hi Michael,

I use a 5A 5V regulator that I got from ebay.

The regulator then powers the RPi and a powered USD hub which then
powers the GPS, HDD, Rigs CAT lead, Sound card modem, Keyboard etc. My
screen is powered directly from the input side of the regulator at 12V.
I use the same setup for other digital modes with FLdigi and also SSTV.

73,

Ivan 5B8BI/G1LPW

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