Date   

Re: Why Pi?

Alan Melia
 


Well I cant help with the query but if I may suggest, you should start a new topic, ie send a new email to the group rather than "stealing" another topic (with theREPLY key)  to which your query is not relevant. You query gets "lost" this way an will probably not be answered.
 
Alan
G3NYK
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 04, 2014 2:37 AM
Subject: Re: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Why Pi?

I don't know how to use this site.  I submitted the request for a simple program to use the GPIO pins for TR sequencing for  my qrp cw rigs.  Please respond to my email if you have an answer or help for me. Thanks, Brock ae4gm2003@...


Re: CRO

Ray Wells
 

Hi John,

I think we were both on the same course there

Take care

Ray vk2tv
��

On 04/02/14 10:27, John Guillory wrote:
��
I guess you didn't detect the sarcasm.

--
KF5QEO
John Guillory
Cell: 601-754-9233
Pinger: 337-240-7890
Google Voice:��601-265-1307




Re: Is there a packet communications program that will work with the TNCPi?

John G8BPQ
 

I only run my packet system for software testing, Tthere are packet BBS systems around, including one here in Nottingham. But you’ll need to find one a bit nearer to you!

 

73,

John

 

 


From: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@... [mailto:Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@...] On Behalf Of John Guillory
Sent: 03 February 2014 11:50
To: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@...
Subject: Re: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Is there a packet communications program that will work with the TNCPi?

 

 

So you run a packet bbs?  What frequency?  I'd like to call some packet bbs's when I get, build, and test the tnc-Pi.  

--

KF5QEO

John Guillory

Cell: 601-754-9233

Pinger: 337-240-7890

Google Voice: 601-265-1307

 


On Feb 3, 2014, at 4:13 AM, "John Wiseman" <john.wiseman@...> wrote:

 

Dave,

 

The normal Linux ax.25 suite includes axcall which can be used to connect to other stations. There are several node, BBS and APRS packages that will run on the PI, including LinBPQ which is a linux version of my BPQ32 Node/BBS system.  

 

73, John G8BPQ

 


From: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@... [mailto:Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@...] On Behalf Of David R. Hassall
Sent: 03 February 2014 02:07
To: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@...
Subject: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Is there a packet communications program that will work with the TNCPi?

 

 

Dear Group,

Is there a packet radio Terminal program that will work with the TNCPi
for the Raspberry Pi? If Not, Is someone working on one? I guess what
I am asking is there something like BAYCOM for Linux That uses the KISS
Protocol to make a complete Packet station.

73 Dave
David R. Hassall WA5DJJ
WEBSITE: http://www.zianet.com/dhassall/


Re: Why Pi?

Kristoff Bonne
 

Hi Brian,


Inline comments.



On 03-02-14 10:46, Brian Jones wrote:
 
I'm doing a talk to my local radio club in a few weeks on the Raspberry Pi and trying to decide how to orient it.

IMHO the RPI is a great machine for:
(...)

The way I usually explain it, is that you have to concider a pi as a different *kind* of computing device then a computer.

A "computer" (PC, mac, tablet, ...) is a *generic* computing device intented for all kinds of applications.
A "device" (like the pi) is a part of a technical sollution, a particular project, for one particular use.

This makes it very difficult from a generic computer. You talked about FLdigi on the pi. Althou it can be that this is technically possible if you tweak the pi enough, do not do that! Please use a laptop for that. It will be much better suited!

Devices like the raspberry pi are not designed for that. They are DEVICES. Concidering their price, a "device" is something you just install somewhere to do one particular task, and then forget about it.


I use a pi in our radio-club to stream our weekly net on echolink. I have used it for other projects like an APRS iGate, a HSMM server or a digital voice modem for codec2.
I've seen it used for all kinds of projects: D-STAR hotspots, D-RATS gateways, APRS nodes, packet gateways, WSPR transmittors, high-altitute ballooning telemetry / webcam server, etc.

Just think of it like this: you have a project (say ... a weather-station) and you need some computing device for that. The raspberry pi can be that computing device: "install and forget".


That also explains why a device has a lot more perifirals and IO pins. The key element of a device is its ease to interface it to other hardware of the project it is part of.





Some other advantages:
- Althou a lot of these kind of devices are used as a headless device that just sits somewhere, quitely doing their work- the pi does have the possiblity to be connected to a TV-screen or a LCD display so to allow interaction. It does have a serious amount of CPU power, something that is needed for interfacing with people.


- Also, in contrast to the "install and forget" idea, the pi and other simular devices do boots from a SD-card.
This means that -by simply changing the SD card- you have a completely different device. Take the pi you just used for your weatherstation, take out the SD card, stuff in a different SD-card, and ... you have a D-STAR gateway, or a D-RATS, or a HSMM server, or whatever.

This means that the "pi" not only usefull for fixed installations, but you can also use it for tempory projects.
You need a computing-device for a telemetry and webcam images for a high-altitude balloon project? Use a pi!
It not only has the advantage of its low weight and power-consumption, concidering its price, it's not the end of the world if you lose it because your balloon happens to  splash down in the north sea. :-)

- The ham-community is now more and more providing "ready to use" flash-card images for the pi (and other simular devices, like the BBB) for one particular application. And that is a major advantage for people who are not interested in learning the ins and out of linux and just need a device that "just works".
It really is an extension of the pi as a computing-device for a project.




I always try to put the raspberry pi in perspective with all the other "computing devices" that exist there out there.

- On the lowest-level, you have microcontrollers like the ATtiny and its PIC equivalent

- Then you have the 8bit microcontrollers (like the ATmega328P) which form the basis of the development boards like the arduino and all other *duino clones out there, or its PIC or other equivalents

- Then there are the 32bit versions of the microcontroller boards (arduino Due, chipkit, pinguino, ...) based on low-end 32 CPUs (ARM, PIC, ...)

- the next step up and the low-end ARM linux boards (like the pi, the Beaglebone black, olimex boards, ...)

- one more step up are the "high-end boards" with dual or quad-core ARM cpus (pandaboard, beaglebone, olimex A10 or A20, cubieboard, Radxa, ...)

- finally, you now have massive multicore parallel-computing boards (like the parallela, FPGA boards, ...)


So there is in fact a "continuem" (or how do you write this?) of devices.
- If you need something as simple as -say- convert serial protocol from a computer to a SPI interface of an IC, the low-end microcontrollers will do.
- if you want to control a 3D printer or a quadcopter, a 8 bit microcontroller will do the job
- if you also need to do some DSP, (e.g. audio-filterting, AFSK demodulation for APRS), then you move into the 32 bit microcontrollers
- If you then move into the linux/unix applications (like a webcam, a packet router, ...) or need to access USB devices (say a RTL dongle as SDR receiver), a device like the pi is a good choice
- if you need still more CPU power (say for face-recognision, ...) the multicore CPUs with NEON and DSP or GPU copro's are what you need
- if you need to process a piece of 300 Mhz radio-spectrum from an SDR receiver, you are moving into the FPGA and/or massive multicore systems domain.


The pi is a very interesting device as it sits in the middle of this pyramide. It also sits on the edge as being a unix/linux device (as most "top level" devices) in contrast to the "microcontroller" based systems (which have their own dedicated IDE) and no OS (or a RTOS).

The fact of using linux is very important is that this means it gives it all the power of an operating-system and software that has more then 40 years of history behind it.
Systems like the arduino do already provide a very large collection of available software out there, the sheer number of application and software that is available for the unix enviroment for all kind of is really a way beyond comparison.




I know, this is probably not really an answer to your question, -especially if you give a presentation to people who do not have a "IT" background and -therefor- their knowlegde of "computing" is limited to PCs, macs, smartphones and tables- I do find it usefull to try to "frame" the boards like the pi into a wider perspective.


It is said that the next big trend of things to come is "the internet of things".

If you look at it from a distance, it is not very difficult to see the raspberry pi as a very interesting component in this.

The added advantage of it is that it is a component that allows people to build their own stuff and experiment; a lot like what the first PCs used to be.
We are again at a point where it is very easy for people to actually build a project they happen to have (ham-radio or other). If that project needs a device with a descent level of computing power- and offers easy interfacing with the other hardware, the pi is a good choice.




Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Brian G0UKB
73
kristoff - ON1ARF


Re: Why Pi?

ks4fr
 

I don't know how to use this site.  I submitted the request for a simple program to use the GPIO pins for TR sequencing for  my qrp cw rigs.  Please respond to my email if you have an answer or help for me. Thanks, Brock ae4gm2003@...


Re: Why Pi?

ks4fr
 

I'm new to the Pi and ham radio. I purchased it for the purpose of Transmit/Receive control.  QRPME has the PICKAXE HATCHET  that does this.  Is there a program I can download to use the Pi GPIO pins to perform TR sequencing?  Brock ae4gm2003@...



---In Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@..., <squirrox@...> wrote:

Brian,

One project I am working on is to use the pi as a standalone beacon transceiver for WSPR ans QRSS.  Basically you can run the WsPR. Software on the 
Pi hook up a soundcard and a simple rx to it. On the Tx side a simple dds module plus a low power PA controlled by the pi. For a display either run it remotely or hook up a 3.4 inch LcD display. No need to use a power hungry PC for this. It is a very QRP solution.



Other projects I know of are, use of a pi to implement an SSB tx and to implement a Web accesible Software Designed Radio, both by Guido, PE1NNZ....

Hope this helps,

Steve G0XAR

On Monday, 3 February 2014, Nick Kennedy <kennnick@...> wrote:
 
That question will definitely have as many answers as there are users.  There are no wrong answers, but I was less interested in running existing apps than in writing some of my own.  I have used the PI to learn about getting around in the Linux OS and to get better at programming in C.  As such, I usually run in the console mode, as opposed to in a GUI.

I also have a couple of Arduinos.  They're very useful and fun, but for the resources on the board, there's no comparison.  BTW, the Arduino sketch language is based on GCC, which is also the native C compiler on the Pi.  I did recently work on programming an Arduino project for a couple of months and did manage to use all available memory.  That's not likely to happen on the Pi.  In truth though, it won't happen often on the Arduino for typical uses.

I was a bit amazed to just plug in a cable from my home router and be on the internet instantly -- no setting up protocols, passwords, or user IDs.  And being able to use Putty / SSH and samba is pretty amazing.  I can operate the Pi from a window on my (Windows) PC and I also have a directory window that's looking at the Pi's directory structure.  I can drag files to and from my Pi while working at my PC even though they are totally different OSs. Edit in Windows, compile in Linux ... hard to believe.

73,

Nick, WA5BDU





Re: CRO

vk4zpp1@...
 

I’m sorry that this acronym, CRO, came into use after RCA (look it up if
that doesn’t ring bells) developed the technology that gave us TV (another
abbreviation.)This was prior to WW2. (Oops)  The cathode ray tube was
around in precursor forms since the last quarter of the 19th century.
(From memory, see Crookes Tube.)
 
It’s not that amateur radio (ham radio) introduced its own jargon or patois
but many of the early professionals, experimenters and academics were also
amateurs. For convenience, common terminology was absorbed into the
recreational side of electronics. (The Q Code came from telegraphy and was
only one of many ways of simplifying message handling that predates Hertz
and Marconi.)
 
There is usually  an historical basis for such useages and trite disparagement
only shows the lack of knowledge of that person. We are fortunate in having
traditions in this hobby; let’s broaden our outlook and not think everything
became available on touch screen tablets, only.
 
Let’s enjoy our Raspberry Pi without eating humble pie.
 
73 de Geoff, VK4ZPP


Re: Flidigi 3.21.78

Reed Fite W4JZ
 

That worked fine John!  No problem typing Fldigi, just glad to get the newer version!

Thanks again John for all your help!  I know Windows, but very new to Linux OS.

73,
Reed W4jz!


Re: CRO

John Guillory <westlakegeek@...>
 

I guess you didn't detect the sarcasm.

--
KF5QEO
John Guillory
Cell: 601-754-9233
Pinger: 337-240-7890
Google Voice: 601-265-1307


On Feb 3, 2014, at 2:40 PM, Ray Wells <vk2tv@...> wrote:

 

Try transceiver for both rx and tx in the same case. It's had that name for decades.

Ray vk2tv

On 03/02/14 08:49, John Guillory wrote:
��
So would a modern transceiver be a receiver transmitter wrapped in one box? ��I guess that makes it a rtwob? Grab your Input and Push To Talk (IPTT) and get on the air with your RTWOB! ��Be sure to use your CallSignForID! (CSFID)

--
KF5QEO
John Guillory
Cell: 601-754-9233
Pinger: 337-240-7890
Google Voice:��601-265-1307


On Feb 2, 2014, at 3:14 PM, Ray Wells <vk2tv@...> wrote:

��

From my earliest days of hands-on with radio and electronics, 50+ years ago, it was always a CRO and quite often written that way in magazine articles. Old habits die hard. To me a Dip Meter will always be a GDO (Grid Dip Oscillator) regardless of any transition from valves (tubes) to transistors or Field Effect Transistors (it was a battle to not write FET). If you use one regularly a Spectrum Analyser becomes a SpecAn.

I'm sure I'm not on my own with acronyms and abbreviations for bits of test equipment but concede that newcomers might be perplexed.

Ray vk2tv



On 03/02/14 02:41, n4lbl wrote:
��
Thank you. ��

Growing up we called them just oscilloscopes. ��If this is their new (to me!) name then I love the irony that many aren't "CR".

Alan,,, �� �� n4lbl,,,


On Sun, Feb 2, 2014 at 6:33 AM, Nigel A. Gunn G8IFF/W8IFF <nigel@...> wrote:
��

Cathode Ray Oscilloscope





Re: Why Pi?

Kristoff Bonne
 

Hi Brian,


Inline comments.



On 03-02-14 10:46, Brian Jones wrote:
 
I'm doing a talk to my local radio club in a few weeks on the Raspberry Pi and trying to decide how to orient it.

IMHO the RPI is a great machine for:
(...)

The way I usually explain it, is that you have to concider a pi as a different *kind* of computing device then a computer.

A "computer" (PC, mac, tablet, ...) is a *generic* computing device intented for all kinds of applications.
A "device" (like the pi) is a part of a technical sollution, a particular project, for one particular use.

This makes it very difficult from a generic computer. You talked about FLdigi on the pi. Althou it can be that this is technically possible if you tweak the pi enough, do not do that! Please use a laptop for that. It will be much better suited!

Devices like the raspberry pi are not designed for that. They are DEVICES. Concidering their price, a "device" is something you just install somewhere to do one particular task, and then forget about it.


I use a pi in our radio-club to stream our weekly net on echolink. I have used it for other projects like an APRS iGate, a HSMM server or a digital voice modem for codec2.
I've seen it used for all kinds of projects: D-STAR hotspots, D-RATS gateways, APRS nodes, packet gateways, WSPR transmittors, high-altitute ballooning telemetry / webcam server, etc.

Just think of it like this: you have a project (say ... a weather-station) and you need some computing device for that. The raspberry pi can be that computing device: "install and forget".


That also explains why a device has a lot more perifirals and IO pins. The key element of a device is its ease to interface it to other hardware of the project it is part of.





Some other advantages:
- Althou a lot of these kind of devices are used as a headless device that just sits somewhere, quitely doing their work- the pi does have the possiblity to be connected to a TV-screen or a LCD display so to allow interaction. It does have a serious amount of CPU power, something that is needed for interfacing with people.


- Also, in contrast to the "install and forget" idea, the pi and other simular devices do boots from a SD-card.
This means that -by simply changing the SD card- you have a completely different device. Take the pi you just used for your weatherstation, take out the SD card, stuff in a different SD-card, and ... you have a D-STAR gateway, or a D-RATS, or a HSMM server, or whatever.

This means that the "pi" not only usefull for fixed installations, but you can also use it for tempory projects.
You need a computing-device for a telemetry and webcam images for a high-altitude balloon project? Use a pi!
It not only has the advantage of its low weight and power-consumption, concidering its price, it's not the end of the world if you lose it because your balloon happens to  splash down in the north sea. :-)

- The ham-community is now more and more providing "ready to use" flash-card images for the pi (and other simular devices, like the BBB) for one particular application. And that is a major advantage for people who are not interested in learning the ins and out of linux and just need a device that "just works".
It really is an extension of the pi as a computing-device for a project.




I always try to put the raspberry pi in perspective with all the other "computing devices" that exist there out there.

- On the lowest-level, you have microcontrollers like the ATtiny and its PIC equivalent

- Then you have the 8bit microcontrollers (like the ATmega328P) which form the basis of the development boards like the arduino and all other *duino clones out there, or its PIC or other equivalents

- Then there are the 32bit versions of the microcontroller boards (arduino Due, chipkit, pinguino, ...) based on low-end 32 CPUs (ARM, PIC, ...)

- the next step up and the low-end ARM linux boards (like the pi, the Beaglebone black, olimex boards, ...)

- one more step up are the "high-end boards" with dual or quad-core ARM cpus (pandaboard, beaglebone, olimex A10 or A20, cubieboard, Radxa, ...)

- finally, you now have massive multicore parallel-computing boards (like the parallela, FPGA boards, ...)


So there is in fact a "continuem" (or how do you write this?) of devices.
- If you need something as simple as -say- convert serial protocol from a computer to a SPI interface of an IC, the low-end microcontrollers will do.
- if you want to control a 3D printer or a quadcopter, a 8 bit microcontroller will do the job
- if you also need to do some DSP, (e.g. audio-filterting, AFSK demodulation for APRS), then you move into the 32 bit microcontrollers
- If you then move into the linux/unix applications (like a webcam, a packet router, ...) or need to access USB devices (say a RTL dongle as SDR receiver), a device like the pi is a good choice
- if you need still more CPU power (say for face-recognision, ...) the multicore CPUs with NEON and DSP or GPU copro's are what you need
- if you need to process a piece of 300 Mhz radio-spectrum from an SDR receiver, you are moving into the FPGA and/or massive multicore systems domain.


The pi is a very interesting device as it sits in the middle of this pyramide. It also sits on the edge as being a unix/linux device (as most "top level" devices) in contrast to the "microcontroller" based systems (which have their own dedicated IDE) and no OS (or a RTOS).

The fact of using linux is very important is that this means it gives it all the power of an operating-system and software that has more then 40 years of history behind it.
Systems like the arduino do already provide a very large collection of available software out there, the sheer number of application and software that is available for the unix enviroment for all kind of is really a way beyond comparison.




I know, this is probably not really an answer to your question, -especially if you give a presentation to people who do not have a "IT" background and -therefor- their knowlegde of "computing" is limited to PCs, macs, smartphones and tables- I do find it usefull to try to "frame" the boards like the pi into a wider perspective.


It is said that the next big trend of things to come is "the internet of things".

If you look at it from a distance, it is not very difficult to see the raspberry pi as a very interesting component in this.

The added advantage of it is that it is a component that allows people to build their own stuff and experiment; a lot like what the first PCs used to be.
We are again at a point where it is very easy for people to actually build a project they happen to have (ham-radio or other). If that project needs a device with a descent level of computing power- and offers easy interfacing with the other hardware, the pi is a good choice.




Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Brian G0UKB
73
kristoff - ON1ARF


Re: Flidigi 3.21.78

John G8BPQ
 

I’m afraid I don’t use a GUI on the PI, so I can’t really help. I start it from a command line. Just type fldigi

 

73,

John

 


From: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@... [mailto:Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@...] On Behalf Of w4jz@...
Sent: 03 February 2014 21:45
To: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@...
Subject: RE: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Flidigi 3.21.78

 

 

Thanks John that worked and the rest went just like you said.

Under the Fldigi-3.21.78 folder/data I see the Fldigi desktop configuration file, but when I paste that to the desktop and try to open nothing happens.  I looked in the 3.21.48 icon, that is on desktop, under properties and that version was using desktop configuration file as the executable program.  Is this the executable file to open Fldigi 3.21.78?  I looked in all the folders and saw some more Fldigi icons, but they didn't work either.

Thanks,
Reed  W4JZ


Re: Why Pi?

Stephen Farthing <squirrox@...>
 

Brian,

One project I am working on is to use the pi as a standalone beacon transceiver for WSPR ans QRSS.  Basically you can run the WsPR. Software on the 
Pi hook up a soundcard and a simple rx to it. On the Tx side a simple dds module plus a low power PA controlled by the pi. For a display either run it remotely or hook up a 3.4 inch LcD display. No need to use a power hungry PC for this. It is a very QRP solution.



Other projects I know of are, use of a pi to implement an SSB tx and to implement a Web accesible Software Designed Radio, both by Guido, PE1NNZ....

Hope this helps,

Steve G0XAR


On Monday, 3 February 2014, Nick Kennedy <kennnick@...> wrote:
 

That question will definitely have as many answers as there are users.  There are no wrong answers, but I was less interested in running existing apps than in writing some of my own.  I have used the PI to learn about getting around in the Linux OS and to get better at programming in C.  As such, I usually run in the console mode, as opposed to in a GUI.

I also have a couple of Arduinos.  They're very useful and fun, but for the resources on the board, there's no comparison.  BTW, the Arduino sketch language is based on GCC, which is also the native C compiler on the Pi.  I did recently work on programming an Arduino project for a couple of months and did manage to use all available memory.  That's not likely to happen on the Pi.  In truth though, it won't happen often on the Arduino for typical uses.

I was a bit amazed to just plug in a cable from my home router and be on the internet instantly -- no setting up protocols, passwords, or user IDs.  And being able to use Putty / SSH and samba is pretty amazing.  I can operate the Pi from a window on my (Windows) PC and I also have a directory window that's looking at the Pi's directory structure.  I can drag files to and from my Pi while working at my PC even though they are totally different OSs. Edit in Windows, compile in Linux ... hard to believe.

73,

Nick, WA5BDU





Re: Flidigi 3.21.78

Reed Fite W4JZ
 

Thanks John that worked and the rest went just like you said.

Under the Fldigi-3.21.78 folder/data I see the Fldigi desktop configuration file, but when I paste that to the desktop and try to open nothing happens.  I looked in the 3.21.48 icon, that is on desktop, under properties and that version was using desktop configuration file as the executable program.  Is this the executable file to open Fldigi 3.21.78?  I looked in all the folders and saw some more Fldigi icons, but they didn't work either.

Thanks,
Reed  W4JZ


Re: CRO

Ray Wells
 

Try transceiver for both rx and tx in the same case. It's had that name for decades.

Ray vk2tv

On 03/02/14 08:49, John Guillory wrote:
��
So would a modern transceiver be a receiver transmitter wrapped in one box? ��I guess that makes it a rtwob? Grab your Input and Push To Talk (IPTT) and get on the air with your RTWOB! ��Be sure to use your CallSignForID! (CSFID)

--
KF5QEO
John Guillory
Cell: 601-754-9233
Pinger: 337-240-7890
Google Voice:��601-265-1307


On Feb 2, 2014, at 3:14 PM, Ray Wells <vk2tv@...> wrote:

��

From my earliest days of hands-on with radio and electronics, 50+ years ago, it was always a CRO and quite often written that way in magazine articles. Old habits die hard. To me a Dip Meter will always be a GDO (Grid Dip Oscillator) regardless of any transition from valves (tubes) to transistors or Field Effect Transistors (it was a battle to not write FET). If you use one regularly a Spectrum Analyser becomes a SpecAn.

I'm sure I'm not on my own with acronyms and abbreviations for bits of test equipment but concede that newcomers might be perplexed.

Ray vk2tv



On 03/02/14 02:41, n4lbl wrote:
��
Thank you. ��

Growing up we called them just oscilloscopes. ��If this is their new (to me!) name then I love the irony that many aren't "CR".

Alan,,, �� �� n4lbl,,,


On Sun, Feb 2, 2014 at 6:33 AM, Nigel A. Gunn G8IFF/W8IFF <nigel@...> wrote:
��

Cathode Ray Oscilloscope





Re: Why Pi?

Nick Kennedy
 

That question will definitely have as many answers as there are users.  There are no wrong answers, but I was less interested in running existing apps than in writing some of my own.  I have used the PI to learn about getting around in the Linux OS and to get better at programming in C.  As such, I usually run in the console mode, as opposed to in a GUI.

I also have a couple of Arduinos.  They're very useful and fun, but for the resources on the board, there's no comparison.  BTW, the Arduino sketch language is based on GCC, which is also the native C compiler on the Pi.  I did recently work on programming an Arduino project for a couple of months and did manage to use all available memory.  That's not likely to happen on the Pi.  In truth though, it won't happen often on the Arduino for typical uses.

I was a bit amazed to just plug in a cable from my home router and be on the internet instantly -- no setting up protocols, passwords, or user IDs.  And being able to use Putty / SSH and samba is pretty amazing.  I can operate the Pi from a window on my (Windows) PC and I also have a directory window that's looking at the Pi's directory structure.  I can drag files to and from my Pi while working at my PC even though they are totally different OSs. Edit in Windows, compile in Linux ... hard to believe.

73,

Nick, WA5BDU





Re: Why Pi?

max wheatley <max@...>
 

For the screen and keyboard .....

Plenty of small keyboard / track pads that will do the odd bit of data entry.

My current goal with Pi I T Car is YAAC and using a Tablet for the screen......


Max



On 3/02/2014 22:46, Brian Jones wrote:
I'm doing a talk to my local radio club in a few weeks on the Raspberry Pi and trying to decide how to orient it.

IMHO the RPI is a great machine for:
Having another cheap computer in the shack
Learning - particularly Linux and programming but also playing with networking, wifi etc - because if you screw things up then simply reflashing the SD fixes things 
Low-power computing such as running 24*7 for a webcam, webserver etc - WSPTR falls into this category (why is there no decent Linux software for monitoring the NCDXF beacons and logging signal strength? - a brilliant RPI app)
Playing with interfacing via the GPIO and building projects traditionally built on an Arduino/PIC. The Pi is faster, got good gfx,easy/USB internet access, SD card for data logging etc. so can do much more

I will talk about the TNC-PI but this is something I know little about - what cool things could I use it for other than APRS? Also I'll mention a cheap D-STAR gateway using a DC-Dongle - indeed our local MB6EL gateway is RPI based?

What I'm struggling with is, why FLDIGI, Gpredict etc? A lot of folks here are using the RPI for this sort of application which I just simply use my desktop machine for. Since the RPI needs screen, keyboard and mouse for this sort of application what is the advantage over running on bigger hardware? I guess I can see the - "my other machine is Windows and I want to explore the Linux software" argument but wonder if I'm missing something and there are real advantages in using the RPI rather than the desktop/laptop machine.

One thought I had was using the RPI without screen or keyboard when mobile - perhaps a 16*2 LCD matrix or simply using Festival or Espeak to speak output and some simple voice recognition input. Perhaps this might be useful for a simple logging program - the RPI connects to the rig so all it needs to voice recognise is the phonetics of the station worked and the RST numbers. Anyone else got any whacky ideas?

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Brian G0UKB

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Re: Why Pi?

Steve Black
 

Another great feature, You screw up and you unplug it, repower it and start fresh with a renewed OS. Try that with a laptop and you'll get start up delays and memory checks. Steve  KB1CHU

On 2/3/2014 9:19 AM, am_fm_radio@... wrote:
 

Brian-
You pose an interesting question- "I want to explore the Linux software" argument but wonder if I'm missing something and there are real advantages in using the RPI rather than the desktop/laptop machine".

The PI offers I/O such that it makes easy interface to "real world" applications. Take a window's machine and add a circuit to check a push button and if depressed, click a relay...just how easy is that to interface to any PC? Traditional Parallel (and serial too) ports have gone by the wayside. The TNC-PI is premier  integration of the PI and another box. Look at the advantage the Raspberry PI has using the TNC-PI over using the older TNC-X The PI can decode packets using either one of them. Look at the cost difference of doing it both ways.

Size, cost, and complexity. Points of complexity-
No power switch.
No expandible/configurable CPU RAM.
No recommended container
Expansion is limited to USB buss
Use of a inexpensive electrically small, physically small device for traditional "disk" type storage.

Important in your talk I believe is you should differentiate between  ARDUINO and Raspberry PI. Expecially if and when ham operators are looking a starting-making-developing some sort of project.

If you look at both in simplestic terms. The ARDUINO has no operating system available. You load a program-"SKETCH" and it runs... You can turn it on, turn it off, it will not do anything else till you load a new sketch into it. The PI has an operating system, O/S there are things you can do with a series of commands. including - run a program.

 




---In Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@..., wrote:

I'm doing a talk to my local radio club in a few weeks on the Raspberry Pi and trying to decide how to orient it.

IMHO the RPI is a great machine for:
Having another cheap computer in the shack
Learning - particularly Linux and programming but also playing with networking, wifi etc - because if you screw things up then simply reflashing the SD fixes things 
Low-power computing such as running 24*7 for a webcam, webserver etc - WSPTR falls into this category (why is there no decent Linux software for monitoring the NCDXF beacons and logging signal strength? - a brilliant RPI app)
Playing with interfacing via the GPIO and building projects traditionally built on an Arduino/PIC. The Pi is faster, got good gfx,easy/USB internet access, SD card for data logging etc. so can do much more

I will talk about the TNC-PI but this is something I know little about - what cool things could I use it for other than APRS? Also I'll mention a cheap D-STAR gateway using a DC-Dongle - indeed our local MB6EL gateway is RPI based?

What I'm struggling with is, why FLDIGI, Gpredict etc? A lot of folks here are using the RPI for this sort of application which I just simply use my desktop machine for. Since the RPI needs screen, keyboard and mouse for this sort of application what is the advantage over running on bigger hardware? I guess I can see the - "my other machine is Windows and I want to explore the Linux software" argument but wonder if I'm missing something and there are real advantages in using the RPI rather than the desktop/laptop machine.

One thought I had was using the RPI without screen or keyboard when mobile - perhaps a 16*2 LCD matrix or simply using Festival or Espeak to sp eak output and some simple voice recognition input. Perhaps this might be useful for a simple logging program - the RPI connects to the rig so all it needs to voice recognise is the phonetics of the station worked and the RST numbers. Anyone else got any whacky ideas?

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Brian G0UKB


Re: Why Pi?

g0ukb
 

Thanks John, not come across theHackberry Pi before. My talk is probably just going to focus on the Raspberry Pi itself rather than variants, although it will be worth mentioning that newer, faster and more functioned boards are starting to become available.


I forget to mention media streaming as one of the use cases. I have 3 raspberry Pis  - one is permanently assigned to running XBMC via Openelec and streaming music and video to my AV-amp and TV, one is currently assigned to running a webserver hosting my daughter's website and will be running my birdbox webcam should it get nestlings this year, the third is my play around with RPi for exploring in the shack - currently looking into voice recognition and how hard it would be to hack some code together to provide an NCDXF propagation monitor which I think would be great app for an always on, data logging computer like the RPi.


Just this morning ordered a camera as another use it to put one of the RPI's to provide media streaming, wireless reversing camera, gps logging and a few other ideas.


I'm struggling  to think of really good in-shack/portable use cases where it makes more sense to use a RPi rather than desktop/laptop which is why I raised the question.


Brian G0UKB



Re: Why Pi?

Larry Macionski
 

Brian-
You pose an interesting question- "I want to explore the Linux software" argument but wonder if I'm missing something and there are real advantages in using the RPI rather than the desktop/laptop machine".

The PI offers I/O such that it makes easy interface to "real world" applications. Take a window's machine and add a circuit to check a push button and if depressed, click a relay...just how easy is that to interface to any PC? Traditional Parallel (and serial too) ports have gone by the wayside. The TNC-PI is premier  integration of the PI and another box. Look at the advantage the Raspberry PI has using the TNC-PI over using the older TNC-X The PI can decode packets using either one of them. Look at the cost difference of doing it both ways.

Size, cost, and complexity. Points of complexity-
No power switch.
No expandible/configurable CPU RAM.
No recommended container
Expansion is limited to USB buss
Use of a inexpensive electrically small, physically small device for traditional "disk" type storage.

Important in your talk I believe is you should differentiate between  ARDUINO and Raspberry PI. Expecially if and when ham operators are looking a starting-making-developing some sort of project.

If you look at both in simplestic terms. The ARDUINO has no operating system available. You load a program-"SKETCH" and it runs... You can turn it on, turn it off, it will not do anything else till you load a new sketch into it. The PI has an operating system, O/S there are things you can do with a series of commands. including - run a program.

 




---In Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@..., <g0ukb@...> wrote:

I'm doing a talk to my local radio club in a few weeks on the Raspberry Pi and trying to decide how to orient it.

IMHO the RPI is a great machine for:
Having another cheap computer in the shack
Learning - particularly Linux and programming but also playing with networking, wifi etc - because if you screw things up then simply reflashing the SD fixes things 
Low-power computing such as running 24*7 for a webcam, webserver etc - WSPTR falls into this category (why is there no decent Linux software for monitoring the NCDXF beacons and logging signal strength? - a brilliant RPI app)
Playing with interfacing via the GPIO and building projects traditionally built on an Arduino/PIC. The Pi is faster, got good gfx,easy/USB internet access, SD card for data logging etc. so can do much more

I will talk about the TNC-PI but this is something I know little about - what cool things could I use it for other than APRS? Also I'll mention a cheap D-STAR gateway using a DC-Dongle - indeed our local MB6EL gateway is RPI based?

What I'm struggling with is, why FLDIGI, Gpredict etc? A lot of folks here are using the RPI for this sort of application which I just simply use my desktop machine for. Since the RPI needs screen, keyboard and mouse for this sort of application what is the advantage over running on bigger hardware? I guess I can see the - "my other machine is Windows and I want to explore the Linux software" argument but wonder if I'm missing something and there are real advantages in using the RPI rather than the desktop/laptop machine.

One thought I had was using the RPI without screen or keyboard when mobile - perhaps a 16*2 LCD matrix or simply using Festival or Espeak to speak output and some simple voice recognition input. Perhaps this might be useful for a simple logging program - the RPI connects to the rig so all it needs to voice recognise is the phonetics of the station worked and the RST numbers. Anyone else got any whacky ideas?

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Brian G0UKB


Re: Is there a packet communications program that will work with the TNCPi?

Bob Scan
 

Works well...I use it to put my MFJ TNC's back into Kissmode when they slip into command mode.

Just remember to kill the kissattach or you won't be able to access the serial port associated with the TNC.

B


From: Ian
To: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@...
Sent: Monday, February 3, 2014 5:28:29 AM
Subject: Re: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Is there a packet communications program that will work with the TNCPi?

 

--------------------------------------------
On Mon, 3/2/14, David R. Hassall wrote:

Subject: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Is there a packet communications program that will work with the TNCPi?
To: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@...
Date: Monday, 3 February, 2014, 2:06



Hello Dave,

Try Minicom, a terminal program that works with everything.

sudo apt-get install minicom

73,
Ian..












 









Dear Group,



Is there a packet radio Terminal program that will work with
the TNCPi

for the Raspberry Pi? If Not, Is someone working on one? I
guess what

I am asking is there something like BAYCOM for Linux That
uses the KISS

Protocol to make a complete Packet station.



73 Dave

David R. Hassall WA5DJJ

WEBSITE: http://www.zianet.com/dhassall/




























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