Date   

Re: polling failed, but working now

Mark Griffith
 

Get them through the GUI. You showed log files before so you know how to do it.

The logs are kept for one day and rotate out at 0000Z.

Mark 
KD0QYN 



On Wed, Sep 8, 2021 at 11:45 AM, Chris Clement
<chris@...> wrote:
Where are the log files in the PiGate client? One directory called logs only has one file of temperature data. I want a copy of my last poll where it connected properly and cleared the queue. TIA


Re: SD Cards Erased Upon Removal? #raspberrypi #usability #hampi #hardware #pi

 

Power key on the 400 probably issues a
sudo shutdown now
command.


On 08/09/2021 12:42 Dave R <daverickmers@gmail.com> wrote:


Is that the same as thr Power key on the pi400? Thanks. 73


On Wed, Sep 8, 2021, 08:22 David Ranch <rpi4hamradio-groupsio@trinnet.net> wrote:

I agree with everything JeffW4JEW mentioned and with some tuning and proper handling, a Raspberry Pi can be very reliable. A few comments here..



There are lots of embedded devices/appliances that are designed in such a way that there is little to no risk in abruptly disconnecting power (I.e. Openspot). The Raspberry Pi is not one of them.
This can also be done with a Raspberry Pi with making it's file system read-only. There are some guides on the Internet to do this but it's very complex. The other challenge is that when you want to make a permanent and persistent change say to a configuration file or patch your Raspberry Pi OS, you have to undo all that read-only work only to re-do it once your done!




P.P.S. There’s lots of examples of people that build a hardware switch connected to two of the GPIO pins that, when pressed, trigger a shutdown command. I’ve been meaning to try one. This is a great solution for the inconvenience of having to SSH in or rely on connecting to a browser interface to click a “soft” shutdown button.
I would recommend EVERYONE who has a Raspberry Pi to set this up. It's very easy and the other problem that even if you think "Oh, I'll just connect up a HDMI monitor and keyboard if I have to", a *lot* of Raspberry Pis will reset (aka reboot) when you connect the HDMI cable. Even if it doesn't reset, the display won't work as the HDMI port is disabled as nothing was connected when you first boot. This is such a useful feature that many add-on Rpi HAT boards have a user configurable button on them that can be easily used for this simple task. Try it.. very recommended!

--David
KI6ZHD
Nigel A. Gunn, ///shoulders.outwards.resolutions tel +1-937-971-0366
Amateur Radio G8IFF W8IFF and GMRS WRBV701, e-mail nigel@ngunn.net www http://www.ngunn.net


Re: polling failed, but working now

Chris Clement
 

Where are the log files in the PiGate client? One directory called logs only has one file of temperature data. I want a copy of my last poll where it connected properly and cleared the queue. TIA


Re: SD Cards Erased Upon Removal? #raspberrypi #usability #hampi #hardware #pi

Dave R
 

Is that the same as thr Power key on the pi400? Thanks. 73


On Wed, Sep 8, 2021, 08:22 David Ranch <rpi4hamradio-groupsio@...> wrote:

I agree with everything Jeff W4JEW mentioned and with some tuning and proper handling, a Raspberry Pi can be very reliable.  A few comments here..


There are lots of embedded devices/appliances that are designed in such a way that there is little to no risk in abruptly disconnecting power (I.e. Openspot). The Raspberry Pi is not one of them.

This can also be done with a Raspberry Pi with making it's file system read-only.  There are some guides on the Internet to do this but it's very complex.  The other challenge is that when you want to make a permanent and persistent change say to a configuration file or patch your Raspberry Pi OS, you have to undo all that read-only work only to re-do it once your done!



P.P.S. There’s lots of examples of people that build a hardware switch connected to two of the GPIO pins that, when pressed, trigger a shutdown command. I’ve been meaning to try one. This is a great solution for the inconvenience of having to SSH in or rely on connecting to a browser interface to click a “soft” shutdown button.

I would recommend EVERYONE who has a Raspberry Pi to set this up.  It's very easy and the other problem that even if you think "Oh, I'll just connect up a HDMI monitor and keyboard if I have to", a *lot* of Raspberry Pis will reset (aka reboot) when you connect the HDMI cable.  Even if it doesn't reset, the display won't work as the HDMI port is disabled as nothing was connected when you first boot.  This is such a useful feature that many add-on Rpi HAT boards have a user configurable button on them that can be easily used for this simple task.  Try it.. very recommended!

--David
KI6ZHD


Re: SD Cards Erased Upon Removal? #raspberrypi #usability #hampi #hardware #pi

N5XMT
 

Mark,
The pi developers even talk about power disconnects, power failures etc causing corruption of the SD cards on the raspberrypi.org forums.  It's not that Linux has an issue, it is how the files are manipulated on SD storage.  Totally different animal than a hard drive, an SSD or even a USB thumb drive.
It could be the way their firmware is, or it could be the SD itself. The SD cards were designed to be storage devices with Few writes, lots of reads... Like a digital camera (which was their first designed usage).

On Sep 8, 2021, at 08:40, "Mark Griffith via groups.io" <yahoo.com@groups.io target=_blank>mdgriffith2003=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
All,

These are all great comments. But just to present the other side of the story, I've been administering Linux and Unix computers for over 35 years and I have never seen a file system corrupted as a result of a sudden power outage whether it's a $35,000 server or a $35 Raspberry Pi. Of course this can happen and I don't recommend people just pulling the plug unless you have to for some reason, but I have never seen a Raspberry Pi corrupt the SD card as a result of pulling the power plug. And I've done it more than a few times. 

Again, as the others have said, I don't recommend this. I only bring it up so Raspberry Pi users don't excessively worry about losing all their data in the case of a sudden power failure unless they go to Great Lengths to make sure this doesn't happen.

The nicest thing about the Raspberry Pi is how easy it is to backup your SD card so in case something does happen you don't have to worry about losing anything. People who don't regularly back up their SD card are just asking for trouble.  To be honest, it is so much easier to make backups than all the work to setup a orderly shutdown system. 

But then, some Raspberry Pi users have critical systems running in remote locations that would greatly benefit from such a system.

Just my 2 cents. Don't worry, be happy! 

Mark 
KD0QYN 



On Wed, Sep 8, 2021 at 10:22 AM, David Ranch
<rpi4hamradio-groupsio@...> wrote:

I agree with everything Jeff W4JEW mentioned and with some tuning and proper handling, a Raspberry Pi can be very reliable.  A few comments here..


There are lots of embedded devices/appliances that are designed in such a way that there is little to no risk in abruptly disconnecting power (I.e. Openspot). The Raspberry Pi is not one of them.

This can also be done with a Raspberry Pi with making it's file system read-only.  There are some guides on the Internet to do this but it's very complex.  The other challenge is that when you want to make a permanent and persistent change say to a configuration file or patch your Raspberry Pi OS, you have to undo all that read-only work only to re-do it once your done!



P.P.S. There’s lots of examples of people that build a hardware switch connected to two of the GPIO pins that, when pressed, trigger a shutdown command. I’ve been meaning to try one. This is a great solution for the inconvenience of having to SSH in or rely on connecting to a browser interface to click a “soft” shutdown button.

I would recommend EVERYONE who has a Raspberry Pi to set this up.  It's very easy and the other problem that even if you think "Oh, I'll just connect up a HDMI monitor and keyboard if I have to", a *lot* of Raspberry Pis will reset (aka reboot) when you connect the HDMI cable.  Even if it doesn't reset, the display won't work as the HDMI port is disabled as nothing was connected when you first boot.  This is such a useful feature that many add-on Rpi HAT boards have a user configurable button on them that can be easily used for this simple task.  Try it.. very recommended!

--David
KI6ZHD


Re: WVCARC Etsy store

vince kd7tww
 

Ken

Thank you. The difference in price with 4gb and 8gb was about $10. And I might want to play with a Rasb pi Windoz 7 or 10. I seen it don countless times on YT. TY for the BETA info.

73 de kd7tww

On 09/07/21 7:13 PM, Ken Curtis via groups.io wrote:

Keep in mind, Vince, that the 8GB version can only use 4GB with the current Raspberry Pi OS, since it is 32 bit. The 64 bit version would use all 8GB, but it is still in BETA!

Ken KC3ROF

On 9/7/2021 1:24 PM, Vince A wrote:

Mark

Okay. I have changed my order to a NON stand alone device v3.6. HIHI. I have a ordered a Canakit Rasb 4B 8gb pi kit. Now I need a few 32gb sd cards. I'l be in-touch and keep you all abreast on my progress if you don't mind? TY 73

On 09/06/21 6:59 PM, Mark Griffith via groups.io wrote:
Vince,

If you wanted to use APRS and Winlink on a RaspPi perhaps you should re-order your TNC to the one that plugs into the RaspPi GPIO header.  I'm not sure about APRS or PAT, but the PiGate software just assumes you have a TNC board plugged in.  You can change things, but that means you'll have to make changes in the software.  I can't speak for PAT or APRS, it might be easier.  That is if your focus is Winlink and APRS.

Mark
KD0QYN


On Monday, September 6, 2021, 06:01:47 PM CDT, Vince A <vince@...> wrote:


Mark

My main focus would be Winlink2000 and APRS. IF that helps? TY 73

On 09/06/21 2:56 PM, Mark Griffith via groups.io wrote:
Vince,

You'll want to get a board with the Teensy 3.6 chip.  To be able to do packet, the 3.2 version will work, but if ARDOP or any other modes ever become available for the Teensy, the 3.6 version with more memory and slightly faster processor will be necessary.

The boards will come already configured to run 1200 baud packet, so you can use APRS or PAT or the PiGate software without any modifications.  These are all Raspberry Pi software suites.  APRS is for, well APRS, and PAT and PiGate are for sending email through the Winlink2000 network.

The PiGate software comes as a complete OS image.  The others can be installed on your RaspPi.

Also, depending upon what operating system you install on the RaspPi, you will be able to run commands to connect to a local packet BBS and do the BBS thing.  I would recommend installing the latest Raspbian OS which is designed specifically for the RaspPi.

If you want to use the RaspPi for FLDIGI or WSJTX you won't need to TNC.

Mark
KD0QYN


On Monday, September 6, 2021, 03:36:38 PM CDT, Vince A <vince@...> wrote:


https://www.etsy.com/shop/WVCARC

Group

Got me interested and curios 

Can someone explain what the different models shown on Etsy. I am going to buy one but as newbie and starting out which one is best for a starter?  I have a Ras pi 3b+

Also what software to use/install, would be good for a starter and newbie like me?

-- 
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)
-- 
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)
-- 
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)
-- 
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)


Re: SD Cards Erased Upon Removal? #raspberrypi #usability #hampi #hardware #pi

Mark Griffith
 

All,

These are all great comments. But just to present the other side of the story, I've been administering Linux and Unix computers for over 35 years and I have never seen a file system corrupted as a result of a sudden power outage whether it's a $35,000 server or a $35 Raspberry Pi. Of course this can happen and I don't recommend people just pulling the plug unless you have to for some reason, but I have never seen a Raspberry Pi corrupt the SD card as a result of pulling the power plug. And I've done it more than a few times. 

Again, as the others have said, I don't recommend this. I only bring it up so Raspberry Pi users don't excessively worry about losing all their data in the case of a sudden power failure unless they go to Great Lengths to make sure this doesn't happen.

The nicest thing about the Raspberry Pi is how easy it is to backup your SD card so in case something does happen you don't have to worry about losing anything. People who don't regularly back up their SD card are just asking for trouble.  To be honest, it is so much easier to make backups than all the work to setup a orderly shutdown system. 

But then, some Raspberry Pi users have critical systems running in remote locations that would greatly benefit from such a system.

Just my 2 cents. Don't worry, be happy! 

Mark 
KD0QYN 



On Wed, Sep 8, 2021 at 10:22 AM, David Ranch
<rpi4hamradio-groupsio@...> wrote:

I agree with everything Jeff W4JEW mentioned and with some tuning and proper handling, a Raspberry Pi can be very reliable.  A few comments here..


There are lots of embedded devices/appliances that are designed in such a way that there is little to no risk in abruptly disconnecting power (I.e. Openspot). The Raspberry Pi is not one of them.

This can also be done with a Raspberry Pi with making it's file system read-only.  There are some guides on the Internet to do this but it's very complex.  The other challenge is that when you want to make a permanent and persistent change say to a configuration file or patch your Raspberry Pi OS, you have to undo all that read-only work only to re-do it once your done!



P.P.S. There’s lots of examples of people that build a hardware switch connected to two of the GPIO pins that, when pressed, trigger a shutdown command. I’ve been meaning to try one. This is a great solution for the inconvenience of having to SSH in or rely on connecting to a browser interface to click a “soft” shutdown button.

I would recommend EVERYONE who has a Raspberry Pi to set this up.  It's very easy and the other problem that even if you think "Oh, I'll just connect up a HDMI monitor and keyboard if I have to", a *lot* of Raspberry Pis will reset (aka reboot) when you connect the HDMI cable.  Even if it doesn't reset, the display won't work as the HDMI port is disabled as nothing was connected when you first boot.  This is such a useful feature that many add-on Rpi HAT boards have a user configurable button on them that can be easily used for this simple task.  Try it.. very recommended!

--David
KI6ZHD


Re: SD Cards Erased Upon Removal? #raspberrypi #usability #hampi #hardware #pi

David Ranch
 


I agree with everything Jeff W4JEW mentioned and with some tuning and proper handling, a Raspberry Pi can be very reliable.  A few comments here..


There are lots of embedded devices/appliances that are designed in such a way that there is little to no risk in abruptly disconnecting power (I.e. Openspot). The Raspberry Pi is not one of them.

This can also be done with a Raspberry Pi with making it's file system read-only.  There are some guides on the Internet to do this but it's very complex.  The other challenge is that when you want to make a permanent and persistent change say to a configuration file or patch your Raspberry Pi OS, you have to undo all that read-only work only to re-do it once your done!



P.P.S. There’s lots of examples of people that build a hardware switch connected to two of the GPIO pins that, when pressed, trigger a shutdown command. I’ve been meaning to try one. This is a great solution for the inconvenience of having to SSH in or rely on connecting to a browser interface to click a “soft” shutdown button.

I would recommend EVERYONE who has a Raspberry Pi to set this up.  It's very easy and the other problem that even if you think "Oh, I'll just connect up a HDMI monitor and keyboard if I have to", a *lot* of Raspberry Pis will reset (aka reboot) when you connect the HDMI cable.  Even if it doesn't reset, the display won't work as the HDMI port is disabled as nothing was connected when you first boot.  This is such a useful feature that many add-on Rpi HAT boards have a user configurable button on them that can be easily used for this simple task.  Try it.. very recommended!

--David
KI6ZHD


Re: WVCARC Etsy store

Ken Curtis
 

Keep in mind, Vince, that the 8GB version can only use 4GB with the current Raspberry Pi OS, since it is 32 bit. The 64 bit version would use all 8GB, but it is still in BETA!

Ken KC3ROF

On 9/7/2021 1:24 PM, Vince A wrote:

Mark

Okay. I have changed my order to a NON stand alone device v3.6. HIHI. I have a ordered a Canakit Rasb 4B 8gb pi kit. Now I need a few 32gb sd cards. I'l be in-touch and keep you all abreast on my progress if you don't mind? TY 73

On 09/06/21 6:59 PM, Mark Griffith via groups.io wrote:
Vince,

If you wanted to use APRS and Winlink on a RaspPi perhaps you should re-order your TNC to the one that plugs into the RaspPi GPIO header.  I'm not sure about APRS or PAT, but the PiGate software just assumes you have a TNC board plugged in.  You can change things, but that means you'll have to make changes in the software.  I can't speak for PAT or APRS, it might be easier.  That is if your focus is Winlink and APRS.

Mark
KD0QYN


On Monday, September 6, 2021, 06:01:47 PM CDT, Vince A <vince@...> wrote:


Mark

My main focus would be Winlink2000 and APRS. IF that helps? TY 73

On 09/06/21 2:56 PM, Mark Griffith via groups.io wrote:
Vince,

You'll want to get a board with the Teensy 3.6 chip.  To be able to do packet, the 3.2 version will work, but if ARDOP or any other modes ever become available for the Teensy, the 3.6 version with more memory and slightly faster processor will be necessary.

The boards will come already configured to run 1200 baud packet, so you can use APRS or PAT or the PiGate software without any modifications.  These are all Raspberry Pi software suites.  APRS is for, well APRS, and PAT and PiGate are for sending email through the Winlink2000 network.

The PiGate software comes as a complete OS image.  The others can be installed on your RaspPi.

Also, depending upon what operating system you install on the RaspPi, you will be able to run commands to connect to a local packet BBS and do the BBS thing.  I would recommend installing the latest Raspbian OS which is designed specifically for the RaspPi.

If you want to use the RaspPi for FLDIGI or WSJTX you won't need to TNC.

Mark
KD0QYN


On Monday, September 6, 2021, 03:36:38 PM CDT, Vince A <vince@...> wrote:


https://www.etsy.com/shop/WVCARC

Group

Got me interested and curios 

Can someone explain what the different models shown on Etsy. I am going to buy one but as newbie and starting out which one is best for a starter?  I have a Ras pi 3b+

Also what software to use/install, would be good for a starter and newbie like me?

-- 
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)
-- 
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)
-- 
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)


Re: SD Cards Erased Upon Removal? #raspberrypi #usability #hampi #hardware #pi

JeffH - W4JEW
 

One important point I cannot stress enough when it comes to Raspberry Pi devices…. 

You CANNOT just yank the power connection from the device  - ever. 

The storage medium is usually in read/write mode and many files are held open when the device is running. When you perform a graceful shutdown, anything held in memory gets committed to disk and file handlers are closed properly.

The Raspberry Pi is a small computer. Would you yank the power from your desktop or laptop (aside from battery)? No. So why treat the Pi any different?

There are lots of embedded devices/appliances that are designed in such a way that there is little to no risk in abruptly disconnecting power (I.e. Openspot). The Raspberry Pi is not one of them. 

If you do not perform a proper shutdown, then you run the risk of corrupting the storage device and significantly increase your chances of never being able to boot the device again without re-imaging and restoring from backup. 

There are a number of distros that make a concerted effort to keep the filesystem in read only mode (Pi-Star is a good example), but there are plenty of times where it was not possible for the device to re-enter read-only mode after an operation that required switching to read-write. 

I’ve recently changed from using MicroSD to using USB flash drives because they seem to be more resilient and forgiving (faster too!), but they are not immune to this. 

I know - this is a pain in the you know what, but taking the time to perform a graceful shutdown will allow you to enjoy a much stabler device for a lot longer.

I know - some people will probably disagree with me. That’s fine. As long as you have a backup of your configuration and don’t mind the possibility that you may need to re-image your device at some point, then I say YANK AWAY! Enjoy the convenience and increased risk. 

I no longer take the chance and haven’t had a single Pi get corrupted in the past 2 to 3 years since I first learned to not take thw time to do things right.

I can guarantee you that if you don’t properly shutdown the Pi, it’s not a matter of IF it will get corrupted, it’s a matter of WHEN. 

Ok…off soapbox. 


P.S. I recently came across Samsung “Endurance” Micro SD cards which are supposed to be very tolerant of running in demanding environments. That doesn’t make them immune to this issue, but I’ve been using one for several months and can say with confidence that I haven’t encountered a single issue. 

P.P.S. There’s lots of examples of people that build a hardware switch connected to two of the GPIO pins that, when pressed, trigger a shutdown command. I’ve been meaning to try one. This is a great solution for the inconvenience of having to SSH in or rely on connecting to a browser interface to click a “soft” shutdown button. 



On Wed, Aug 18, 2021 at 8:08 PM David AJ6RE <dc1@...> wrote:
I finally got Hampi back up and running today. Actually, it's Version 2.0 now, so at least I got a fresh upgrade for my trouble.

The issue was with the original SanDisk card, which apparently got damaged or corrupted at some point. I re-flashed it along with a new card at the same time for comparison. When I inserted the original card into the reader on the Ubuntu laptop it would hang for about 5 minutes on each of the partitions when I selected them before displaying their contents. The new SD card displayed its contents instantly. 

What I had believed to be a problem with the second card was not. First, I was unaware that the SD could be overwritten by Linux such that its files become invisible to Windows File Explorer, so what I had assumed was a wiped second card was not. Second, I was unable to access the second card on the Rpi via VNC because I first needed to disable the Hampi's autohotspot service which was preventing VNC from connecting to my LAN. 

Anyway, thanks again to you all for your help. 

73's,

David
AJ6RE

--
———

Jeff Hochberg
W4JEW
404-304-4575
jeff@...


Re: WVCARC Etsy store

vince kd7tww
 

Mark

Okay. I have changed my order to a NON stand alone device v3.6. HIHI. I have a ordered a Canakit Rasb 4B 8gb pi kit. Now I need a few 32gb sd cards. I'l be in-touch and keep you all abreast on my progress if you don't mind? TY 73

On 09/06/21 6:59 PM, Mark Griffith via groups.io wrote:
Vince,

If you wanted to use APRS and Winlink on a RaspPi perhaps you should re-order your TNC to the one that plugs into the RaspPi GPIO header.  I'm not sure about APRS or PAT, but the PiGate software just assumes you have a TNC board plugged in.  You can change things, but that means you'll have to make changes in the software.  I can't speak for PAT or APRS, it might be easier.  That is if your focus is Winlink and APRS.

Mark
KD0QYN


On Monday, September 6, 2021, 06:01:47 PM CDT, Vince A <vince@...> wrote:


Mark

My main focus would be Winlink2000 and APRS. IF that helps? TY 73

On 09/06/21 2:56 PM, Mark Griffith via groups.io wrote:
Vince,

You'll want to get a board with the Teensy 3.6 chip.  To be able to do packet, the 3.2 version will work, but if ARDOP or any other modes ever become available for the Teensy, the 3.6 version with more memory and slightly faster processor will be necessary.

The boards will come already configured to run 1200 baud packet, so you can use APRS or PAT or the PiGate software without any modifications.  These are all Raspberry Pi software suites.  APRS is for, well APRS, and PAT and PiGate are for sending email through the Winlink2000 network.

The PiGate software comes as a complete OS image.  The others can be installed on your RaspPi.

Also, depending upon what operating system you install on the RaspPi, you will be able to run commands to connect to a local packet BBS and do the BBS thing.  I would recommend installing the latest Raspbian OS which is designed specifically for the RaspPi.

If you want to use the RaspPi for FLDIGI or WSJTX you won't need to TNC.

Mark
KD0QYN


On Monday, September 6, 2021, 03:36:38 PM CDT, Vince A <vince@...> wrote:


https://www.etsy.com/shop/WVCARC

Group

Got me interested and curios 

Can someone explain what the different models shown on Etsy. I am going to buy one but as newbie and starting out which one is best for a starter?  I have a Ras pi 3b+

Also what software to use/install, would be good for a starter and newbie like me?

-- 
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)
-- 
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)
-- 
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)


Re: TYT 8600 is a mobile dual bander radio about 20w

vince kd7tww
 

Eric this is not a DMR radio both 2 m and 70 cm for the tyt - 8600 are all analog 73

Get Outlook for Android KD7TWW-VINCE


From: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io <RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io> on behalf of Eric Osterberg via groups.io <ejosterberg@...>
Sent: Tuesday, September 7, 2021 11:04:47 AM
To: RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io <RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RaspberryPi-4-HamRadio] TYT 8600 is a mobile dual bander radio about 20w
 
Also keep in mind, if testing on a DMR channel, the radio is transmitting only ~47% of the time as DMR is TDMA technology. The other time-slot is used by another radio about 47%
 of the time with a small gap for propagation delays, etc. So your watt meter might be recording 'average power' or the radio may only be rated at X watts of power at that <50% duty cycle.

On Mon, Sep 6, 2021 at 1:16 PM Vince A <vince@...> wrote:
Group

I highly doubt that the TYT 8600 is a 50w radio. I have one and really
like it. At best it does 20w on high on 2 meters at certain Freq s. I
have checked this with a SWR/Watt meter.

--
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)







Re: TYT 8600 is a mobile dual bander radio about 20w

Eric Osterberg
 

Also keep in mind, if testing on a DMR channel, the radio is transmitting only ~47% of the time as DMR is TDMA technology. The other time-slot is used by another radio about 47%
 of the time with a small gap for propagation delays, etc. So your watt meter might be recording 'average power' or the radio may only be rated at X watts of power at that <50% duty cycle.

On Mon, Sep 6, 2021 at 1:16 PM Vince A <vince@...> wrote:
Group

I highly doubt that the TYT 8600 is a 50w radio. I have one and really
like it. At best it does 20w on high on 2 meters at certain Freq s. I
have checked this with a SWR/Watt meter.

--
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)







Re: APRS Freq 70 CM?

Phil Culmer 2E0HGU
 

432.500 is used in Europe.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_Packet_Reporting_System?wprov=sfla1 lists other frequencies, but that is the only UHF listed.

73
Phil
2E0HGU

On Mon, 6 Sep 2021, 21:12 Vince A, <vince@...> wrote:
Hello group

Is there an APRS Freq in 440 70cm in the USA or other countrys?

--
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)







Re: WVCARC Etsy store

John G8BPQ
 

I have the Sound Card Emulator ("Signalink Type") device running on a 3.2. What compile errors are you getting?

73,
John G8BPQ

On 06/09/2021 21:50, Mat Murdock wrote:
TNC-Pi9k6 - Raspberry Pi Hat
This TNC fits on top of a raspberry PI.  It comes with two different Teensy's. (brains).  If you are just using packet go with the 3.2.  If you want to try Ardop (experimental) go with the 3.6.

TNC-Pi9k6 - Stand Alone
This TNC connects to your computer with a USB cable.  Works out of the box with Winlink if running Windows 10.  Can also be used with AGWPE to which you can learn more about here: https://www.sv2agw.com/downloads/
It also has the same 3.2 and 3.6 options.  If you are just doing packet, go with 3.2.   There is also an experimental firmware currently only for the 3.6 that turns your TNC into a Signalink type device.  I have been having some issues compiling it for the 3.2 so if anyone has some insights into that, that would be great.

Mat


Re: WVCARC Etsy store

Mark Griffith
 

Vince,

If you wanted to use APRS and Winlink on a RaspPi perhaps you should re-order your TNC to the one that plugs into the RaspPi GPIO header.  I'm not sure about APRS or PAT, but the PiGate software just assumes you have a TNC board plugged in.  You can change things, but that means you'll have to make changes in the software.  I can't speak for PAT or APRS, it might be easier.  That is if your focus is Winlink and APRS.

Mark
KD0QYN


On Monday, September 6, 2021, 06:01:47 PM CDT, Vince A <vince@...> wrote:


Mark

My main focus would be Winlink2000 and APRS. IF that helps? TY 73

On 09/06/21 2:56 PM, Mark Griffith via groups.io wrote:
Vince,

You'll want to get a board with the Teensy 3.6 chip.  To be able to do packet, the 3.2 version will work, but if ARDOP or any other modes ever become available for the Teensy, the 3.6 version with more memory and slightly faster processor will be necessary.

The boards will come already configured to run 1200 baud packet, so you can use APRS or PAT or the PiGate software without any modifications.  These are all Raspberry Pi software suites.  APRS is for, well APRS, and PAT and PiGate are for sending email through the Winlink2000 network.

The PiGate software comes as a complete OS image.  The others can be installed on your RaspPi.

Also, depending upon what operating system you install on the RaspPi, you will be able to run commands to connect to a local packet BBS and do the BBS thing.  I would recommend installing the latest Raspbian OS which is designed specifically for the RaspPi.

If you want to use the RaspPi for FLDIGI or WSJTX you won't need to TNC.

Mark
KD0QYN


On Monday, September 6, 2021, 03:36:38 PM CDT, Vince A <vince@...> wrote:


https://www.etsy.com/shop/WVCARC

Group

Got me interested and curios 

Can someone explain what the different models shown on Etsy. I am going to buy one but as newbie and starting out which one is best for a starter?  I have a Ras pi 3b+

Also what software to use/install, would be good for a starter and newbie like me?

-- 
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)
-- 
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)


Re: Min size SD Card for Rasb Pi 3B+ 16 or 32?

N5XMT
 

Also, make sure you are shutting the pi down gracefully with the shutdown command.  A lot of people just power it off and that will corrupt an SD card in a hurry

On Sep 6, 2021, at 16:09, Vince A <vince@...> wrote:

David

32gb, okay

Sandisk, okay

I have had a SD card go corrupt twice in a Rapb pi. Lost all my settings and hours later finally got the pi back online!

Thanks for the url's  73

On 09/06/21 3:03 PM, David Ranch via groups.io wrote:

Hello Vince,

Not all SD cards are equal where some are faster than others, longevity depends both on the manufacturer but also your use of it, etc.  I would recommend the following:

   - Don't go for anything smaller than 16GB.  SD cards are just too inexpensive these days not to give you some extra space.  Consider even going for 32GB now

   - No need for industrial SD cards unless you really *must* use an SD card.  If you really need top reliability, consider following some  SD hardening techniques like using RAM drives and stop logging to the SD card (which wears them out faster).

   - Buy from a reputable reseller to avoid counterfeit SD cards where the price is "too good to be true"

   - I've had great luck with real Sandisk SD cards but there are some recent articles for you to consider.  I don't recommend to go for knock-off, no-name brands as there are bazillions of reports of people having issues with cheap cards.  Personally, my hair is too valuable over saving like $4.00 between a cheap card and a main brand manufacturer.  Anyway, here are some recent URLs to consider:
         - https://www.tomshardware.com/best-picks/raspberry-pi-microsd-cards
        - https://www.tomshardware.com/best-picks/raspberry-pi-microsd-cards
       - Older but an excellent reference - https://elinux.org/RPi_SD_cards

    - Overall, don't buy an SD card just for it's rated performance as the various Raspberry Pi units really won't take advantage of the higher speed cards past Class-10.  If you want high speed I/O and/or high write endurance, buy an external USB 3.0 to SSD drive instead (you won't need an SD card at all).  There are lots of these out there from Samsung, Seagate, Western Digital, Kingston, etc.  If you go this route, make sure you don't buy a cache-less drive as the performance can suffer for only saving a few bucks.

   - If you go with SD cards, make sure to buy a few extra SD cards so you can play around with other Raspberry PI images and what not

--David
KI6ZHD


On 09/06/2021 01:29 PM, Vince A wrote:
Group

Type and size? SD Card. What to buy? Someone suggested Sandisk Industrial Amazon links, please?


--
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)


Re: APRS Freq 70 CM?

vince kd7tww
 

Ray

Wow! It's a small world aint it?! HIHI  73

On 09/06/21 5:46 PM, Ray Wells via groups.io wrote:
Vince

For APRS?  Definitely 145.175. I can only guess that there is some use being made of the 70cm frequency "somewhere" in Oz but I'm rural, around 350km from the nearest city major city, where there's not much 2m APRS activity apart from the occasional mobile passing through, or numerous digis "talking" to each other. There's no 70cm APRS around here :) My APRS efforts these days are directed at providing VHF and UHF satgate facilities.

To put things into perspective for channel usage, there is only about 15,000 licensed hams in Oz, a country roughly the size of the lower 48 US states but with a population of only about 27,000,000.

Ray vk2tv

On 7/9/21 9:29 am, Vince A wrote:

Ray

What Freq's are more popular in Oz?  73 vince

On 09/06/21 5:20 PM, Ray Wells via groups.io wrote:
Possible oops, my previous might be interpreted as the 70cm frequency is "it".  To clarify, for just in case, Oz does also have 145.175MHz as the 2m national APRS frequency.

Ray vk2tv

On 7/9/21 9:12 am, Vince A wrote:

Ray

Hmm... Wow! Okay, then... I learn som-fing new all the time! Thanks 73 de kd7tww

On 09/06/21 3:57 PM, Ray Wells via groups.io wrote:
Just adding to what David has provided, the WIA (Wireless Institute of Australia) 70cm band plan (at 09-2020) shows 439.100MHz as the Oz national ARPS frequency.

Ray vk2tv

On 7/9/21 6:45 am, David Ranch wrote:

Hello Vince,

Generally speaking.. No, there isn't really any "national" APRS frequencies in the 70cm band.  Per http://www.aprs.org :

   - United States uses 144.390
   - Europe uses 144.800
   - Australia uses 145.175


That said..  different regions can and will have their own specific bandplans so you need to look things up for your your area.  For example, in my region, there is one secondary 2m APRS frequency:

   http://ncpa.n0ary.org/ncpabandplan.html#2m


For your region, the best I could find for Idaho is this:

   https://www.idahoares.info/idaho_band_plan_2meters.php

but it doesn't look like a real band plan and there isn't much mention of 70cm or any other frequencies.  You might want to email some of those resources to learn more.

--David
KI6ZHD






On 09/06/2021 01:12 PM, Vince A wrote:
Hello group

Is there an APRS Freq in 440 70cm in the USA or other countrys?



-- 
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)

-- 
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)

-- 
73, de Vince KD7TWW
In what year did the FCC mandate the 1500 Watt PEP limit for amateur radio station
power output? - Motorola Corp was formally named
"Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" (1928–1947)


Re: WVCARC Etsy store

Mat Murdock
 

The version for the Raspberry pi gets its power from the Pi.  The stand alone version gets its power from the usb cable.

Mat


Re: APRS Freq 70 CM?

Arnold Harding - KQ6DI
 

In California there are voice repeaters on this frequency.  Many have been on 442.925 for 30+ years, so check before using for APRS.
I wish there was a 440 frequency as well, so don't think I'm trying to hog the 440 band...
Arnold, KQ6DI

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