Date   

Buck converters and fusing

Chuck M
 

Finally found the link for the ones we got.  Used for both running 12V fans on our 3D printer, replacing the noisy 24 vdc OEM ones.  And for providing 5 vdc to run my RPi 3B from 12 vdc battery.  Worked well for us.


Printed case to hold them.


And fuse holder to protect the RPi in case of a problem.



Lots of other choices available depending on what your interests and pieces / parts happen to be.

73
Chuck
KD9DVB





Re: Noisy Pi4 - particularly on 2m

David Ranch
 


The one thing I haven't had much luck on is finding metal cases that support expansion to support one or two or three HATs, WITH a fan.  To me, something like this really needs a side-draft mounted fan to get the air movement to the CPU.  I've found these but not using ideally ferric metals (steel... not aluminum or plastic).

--David
KI6ZHD


On 06/02/2020 03:29 PM, John D Hays - K7VE wrote:
We have found that placing the board and any HATs in a faraday cage (metal case) solves on board problems.


Re: pi9k6 Winlink Pat ARDOP

Bill AA6BD
 

Thanks, John.  The ! worked.

--
Bill AA6BD


Re: Noisy Pi4 - particularly on 2m

N5XMT
 

I picked up a pack of 4 adjustable 5A Buck converters off Amazon for 14 bucks  12v in, adjusted the output to 5.2V.  One I ran a USB-C cable from it to the Pi4 for power, the other 3 I ran the buck converter to the 5V GPIO pins for power.  All 4 are working great


On Wed, Jun 3, 2020 at 10:23 AM Tadd KA2DEW in NC via groups.io <tadd=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
What we need is a 9 V to 15 V DC input device which outputs 5.1v regulated to a USB socket and which delivers that voltage reliably automatically when the input voltage is applied (not like the new DROK device which requires menu manipulation to turn on the USB output).  Most of the devices that are close to these specs only put out 4.9 to 5 V which is not enough for the PI 4B.  Or, they use screw terminal outputs which is not good for the casual Raspberry PI software engineer.  Sockets are good.  
We’d further like this device to be $20 or less.  I’ve seen things which are really close to what we want for as little as a couple of dollars.  But close doesn’t count here.  It has to be 5.1 VDC and it has to be always on, and it has to take DC input.  

Would it be worth $40 to have a 3 Amp linear supply through-hole KIT that does the above?  I have a schematic for a circuit to do this and handle charging, switchover, and relay protect for a GelCel UPS and early protection alert to Raspberry PI when the battery is getting close to damaging itself.  WN8P did the schematic.  We’re pondering making and selling PCBs (for cost via ETSY) and publishing a bill-of-materials for builder purchase from DigiKey.  

The design seems expensive.  I’m just wondering if it is worth it.  The cost includes the heat sync but no housing or Gel Cel.   Dunno.  It seemed a good idea at the time.  I can do really good kit building instructions. See this page: 


  KA2DEW

On Jun 2, 2020, at 8:33 PM, Chuck M via groups.io <cam51mail@...> wrote:

I've done that as well.  On pi3 tweaked the voltage until lightning icon stayed home.

Thingiverse has various case designs for them depending on model.  Also designs to make inline fuse holder.

Can also get something like this:

KD9DVB


On Tue, Jun 2, 2020 at 7:34 PM, nb7o
<khedgepe@...> wrote:

Another solution, that I use here, is to buy a dc-dc voltage converter.  I have a 12v to 5v dc-dc converter with a usb connector on the 5v side.  I have Anderson power poles on the 12v side and I plug it into my 50a 12v power supply.  The DC-DC converter I have provides 3a of power to the PI which also helps with low voltage conditions on the pi.

 

Seven three de kevin/NB7O



Re: Script & Icon

Ed Bloom, KD9FRQ
 

Is anyone able and willing to help guide me?

Ed, KD9FRQ

On 6/2/2020 11:43 AM, Ed Bloom, KD9FRQ via groups.io wrote:
Two items :

1) I have created a script and would now like to have in Icon on the Desktop or create Menu location for it (Main > Mail >Get Mail from CALL)

2) I need help getting script to run mheard udr1 command, display the call signs only in a tabbed format 5 wide by rows needed to show all results

Prompt me for call sign from above display then execute wl2kax25 -c %CALL% -V where %CALL% is the entered value for the keyboard.

I would greatly appreciate any help you can provide.

73s, Ed, KD9FRQ


Re: Noisy Pi4 - particularly on 2m

Mark Griffith
 

They are definitely all not equal.  I have one now running a 4B with no under voltage alerts for months.

There are lots of little, cheap, USB voltage and current monitors that are available.  Plug your module into it and then from the monitor to the Pi and you can see the voltage and current draw.  I use it to check 5V supplies, and some will show 5.2 or 5.24 volts, and some show 5.0, or 4.98.  You take what you get.  The 5.2 volt outputs work great for all the Raspberry Pi models.

Search on eBay for "Multifunction USB Tester"

Mark
KD0QYN


On Wednesday, June 3, 2020, 2:45:46 PM CDT, Tadd KA2DEW in NC via groups.io <tadd@...> wrote:


Alas they do not do what the Raspberry PI 4B calls for. 
So far I’ve not had one go wrong for 5v needs. 


On Jun 3, 2020, at 3:22 PM, Siegfried Jackstien <siegfried.jackstien@...> wrote:

i had good results for anything that needs 5v with these black power modules

https://www.ebay.de/itm/DC-DC-12V-to-5V-3A-Step-Down-Converter-Power-Supply-Module-Micro-USB-Waterproof/272608334734?hash=item3f78b9138e:g:~HAAAOSw2gxY2hy3

they can be found with open end wires or with usb connector (different versions)

greetz sigi dg9bfc

Am 03.06.2020 um 19:08 schrieb Hank Riley via groups.io:
Mark,

Could you please provide a link or two just to give us a clue about what you're talking about specifically ?  There are so many devices on Ebay it would be really helpful to narrow it down.

Hank
_________________________________________________________

On Jun 3, 2020, at 2:26 PM, Mark Griffith wrote:

There are lots of these modules around, some are better than others.  I have used some that output 5.15 volts consistently, and some just 5.0 volts.  Some have two micro USB connectors, some do not.  I have a few of these I use now that are very reliable.  eBay is a good place to find them.

I guess for $13 you get some and see what happens.  


Re: Noisy Pi4 - particularly on 2m

nb7o
 

Here is a link to the 12v to 5v converters that I use.  I like the water resistant varieties.  I use them on our boat for navigation computer on a pi.

 

 

This converter terminates in a USB jack on the 5v side.

https://smile.amazon.com/HOMREE-Converter-Voltage-Regulator-Standard/dp/B01MEF293V

 

This converter terminates in a micro-usb jack on the 5v side and professes to be waterproof.  I merely hope for resistant.

https://smile.amazon.com/Converter-Regulator-Waterproof-Converters-Smartphone/dp/B07H7X37T6

 

 

seven three de Kevin/NB7O

 


14.2vDC -> 5.1vDC linear supply with features

 

I’m sharing this because this email reflector has been a great source of ideas.  
Also, the more I tell people about it the more egg I get in my face if I don’t follow through, and I want to follow through. 
This is vaporware of the thinnest kind but at least I’ve had some success in kit building projects in the past.  See http://tarpn.net/t/nino-tnc/nino-tnc.html

Larry WN8P and I have been working on a project to build a 5.1v USB-A source for 5.1v power to the Raspberry PI 4B. 
The creeping feature device we have ended up with takes 14.2vDC input and has the USB-A connector as part of the design.
It’s a linear supply so no more noise to the ham-shack.
It’s also a through-hole kit which should be easy enough for a new kit builder to start with.  Assembly instructions are coming after we test the first production ready boards.
  
Our intention is to sell the PCB on ETSY for cost + shipping + tax.  It should be under $10 total though the first run will no doubt be a little more due to small quantity. 
We’ll give away the Bill Of Materials in a ready-for-upload-to-Digikey form.  Also will have instructions on how to do that. 

The supply wants 14.2v input because that is the ideal voltage to trickle charge a plain old Gel Cel.  The voltage will go through a diode and a 47 ohm resistor before making it to the Gel Cel so we needed to start with 14.2v. If you put 13.8v into the supply, the only bad part will be that the Gel Cel won’t ever reach full charge.  That may shorten it’s life by a little.  We’ve found some $9 each (in quantity 10) 2.5amp 12v gel cels but any old left-over cell from a UPS cell swap will do. 

The supply’s features include
All linear supply so no extra hamshack noise
3 amps current capacity
5.1v output to a USB A socket so it’s ready to get connected to your PI 4B
12v Gel Cel for backup 
Instant switchover using a diode bridge so no glitches
Float charges the Gel Cel
Low voltage detect drives a GPIO to the Raspberry PI warning of imminent failure.  
Low voltage protect RELAY so the Gel Cel won’t get drawn down by the charger, or the Raspberry PI
LEDs to show many elements of functionality to make it easier to get working. 

The schematic is attached.  
The board and photos of the board will be in our assembly instructions.  See http://tarpn.net/t/nino-tnc/n9600a/n9600a3/n9600a3-assembly.html for an example of my kit-assembly instructions.  


Beware that this is pre-prototype.  Please kibitz because it’s not too late to change things.  

The disadvantages of using a linear circuit are: 
It gets hot and needs high current parts and a heat sync. 
It isn’t efficient, and turns more than half the power into heat.  A 12v 2amp gel-cel is only as good as a 5v 2amp battery as a back-up device. 

but… it’s easy to assemble as a kit, and has no high speed clocks to cause RFI.  



Re: New Raspberry Pi 4 with 8GB RAM :: native 64bit version of Raspberry Pi OS (was Raspbian) in Beta

David Ranch
 


Oh.. this is an important detail Ron.  Thank you.  I was curious how anyone could build a large heat sink and two fans for $10!  They must be using very cheap sleeve-type fans.   For me personally, I refuse to buy anything using sleeve bearings anymore.

--David
KI6ZHD


On 06/02/2020 06:36 AM, Ron Liekens wrote:
Larry, be aware of the awful quality of the bearings of the used fans on this Jun-electro case. Here the first locked up after ony 36 hours of use the second died the next day.

73' Ron
ON2RON


Re: Noisy Pi4 - particularly on 2m

 

Alas they do not do what the Raspberry PI 4B calls for. 
So far I’ve not had one go wrong for 5v needs. 


On Jun 3, 2020, at 3:22 PM, Siegfried Jackstien <siegfried.jackstien@...> wrote:

i had good results for anything that needs 5v with these black power modules

https://www.ebay.de/itm/DC-DC-12V-to-5V-3A-Step-Down-Converter-Power-Supply-Module-Micro-USB-Waterproof/272608334734?hash=item3f78b9138e:g:~HAAAOSw2gxY2hy3

they can be found with open end wires or with usb connector (different versions)

greetz sigi dg9bfc

Am 03.06.2020 um 19:08 schrieb Hank Riley via groups.io:
Mark,

Could you please provide a link or two just to give us a clue about what you're talking about specifically ?  There are so many devices on Ebay it would be really helpful to narrow it down.

Hank
_________________________________________________________

On Jun 3, 2020, at 2:26 PM, Mark Griffith wrote:

There are lots of these modules around, some are better than others.  I have used some that output 5.15 volts consistently, and some just 5.0 volts.  Some have two micro USB connectors, some do not.  I have a few of these I use now that are very reliable.  eBay is a good place to find them.

I guess for $13 you get some and see what happens.  


Re: Noisy Pi4 - particularly on 2m

Mark Griffith
 

Right, the CPT modules work pretty good.

Mark
KD0QYN

On Wednesday, June 3, 2020, 2:25:19 PM CDT, Siegfried Jackstien <siegfried.jackstien@...> wrote:


i had good results for anything that needs 5v with these black power modules

https://www.ebay.de/itm/DC-DC-12V-to-5V-3A-Step-Down-Converter-Power-Supply-Module-Micro-USB-Waterproof/272608334734?hash=item3f78b9138e:g:~HAAAOSw2gxY2hy3

they can be found with open end wires or with usb connector (different versions)

greetz sigi dg9bfc

Am 03.06.2020 um 19:08 schrieb Hank Riley via groups.io:
Mark,

Could you please provide a link or two just to give us a clue about what you're talking about specifically ?  There are so many devices on Ebay it would be really helpful to narrow it down.

Hank
_________________________________________________________

On Jun 3, 2020, at 2:26 PM, Mark Griffith wrote:

There are lots of these modules around, some are better than others.  I have used some that output 5.15 volts consistently, and some just 5.0 volts.  Some have two micro USB connectors, some do not.  I have a few of these I use now that are very reliable.  eBay is a good place to find them.

I guess for $13 you get some and see what happens.  


Re: Noisy Pi4 - particularly on 2m

Siegfried Jackstien
 

i had good results for anything that needs 5v with these black power modules

https://www.ebay.de/itm/DC-DC-12V-to-5V-3A-Step-Down-Converter-Power-Supply-Module-Micro-USB-Waterproof/272608334734?hash=item3f78b9138e:g:~HAAAOSw2gxY2hy3

they can be found with open end wires or with usb connector (different versions)

greetz sigi dg9bfc

Am 03.06.2020 um 19:08 schrieb Hank Riley via groups.io:

Mark,

Could you please provide a link or two just to give us a clue about what you're talking about specifically ?  There are so many devices on Ebay it would be really helpful to narrow it down.

Hank
_________________________________________________________

On Jun 3, 2020, at 2:26 PM, Mark Griffith wrote:

There are lots of these modules around, some are better than others.  I have used some that output 5.15 volts consistently, and some just 5.0 volts.  Some have two micro USB connectors, some do not.  I have a few of these I use now that are very reliable.  eBay is a good place to find them.

I guess for $13 you get some and see what happens.  


Re: Noisy Pi4 - particularly on 2m

 

Indeed.  $140 is a non-starter.  
It would be idea to be able to fully discharge the battery once in a while with a constant current load while watching the voltage.  This could give us the true capacity.  However..  For $3 worth of parts we can float a gel-cel across a 13.7v supply through a 47 ohm 10watt resistor and that does the job within the Gel Cel survival tolerances specified by the UPS manufacturers, i.e. about 3 years to replacement.  The real value in the $140 device is that it saves the Gel Cel from damage as it passes through the not-recoverable-voltage.  But we can do that with a zener diode, a transistor and a relay.  What we’d really like is two Zener diodes where the higher voltage one would be used to send a logic signal to the Raspberry PI telling it that it is in danger of losing power soon.  I don’t think the $140 device does that.  But we can make a circuit that does, put all fo the switchover and charging parts along with the zeners, relay and whatnot onto a PCB for about $15.  
now.. toss in a DC in 5.1v DC out 3amp regulator with a USB-A socket and we have a real product.  $140?  How about if we sell the PCB for cost and let the operator build the kit from Digikey purchased parts?  $40.  There you go.  My thought processes in a nutshell.  

   Tadd - KA2DEW


On Jun 3, 2020, at 3:15 PM, Mark Griffith via groups.io <mdgriffith2003@...> wrote:

If you want battery backup, you need to have some sort of charger to manage the battery.  This is much more than just providing 12v power.  The PWRGate switches instantly from the power supply to the battery, not causing a Raspberry Pi reboot.  This is the most important thing to me to prevent premature SD card failure.

You can also try putting a battery maintainer as sold in Walmart and other stores that supply 1.5A at 12VDC, and attach that to a battery, and then your 12VDC to microUSB power module.  This works, I have done it in the past, but they are not very good at keeping the battery charged AND supply power to a Raspberry Pi and radio.  The battery eventually looses its charge and you don't find out about it until the power fails and your Raspberry Pis go down.  The PWRGate integrates all the parts.

You are, of course, free to design your own.  There are lots of plans online for voltage converters.

Mark
KD0QYN


On Wednesday, June 3, 2020, 1:30:46 PM CDT, Tadd KA2DEW in NC via groups.io <tadd@...> wrote:


The wet mount radio power gate costs $140??  
And I thought $40 was high. And the battery protection and charge is just one minor feature of the $40 project. 
$13 EACH to try some and see what happens.  Hmm..   

What I’m hearing is that there isn’t really a product out there that gives us the 5.1v from 12v every time one is bought and tried.  
The little wall wart thing for the Raspberry PI 4 is a good thing, but it has the wrong voltage input and no battery backup. 


On Jun 3, 2020, at 2:26 PM, Mark Griffith via groups.io <mdgriffith2003@...> wrote:

There are lots of these modules around, some are better than others.  I have used some that output 5.15 volts consistently, and some just 5.0 volts.  Some have two micro USB connectors, some do not.  I have a few of these I use now that are very reliable.  eBay is a good place to find them.

I guess for $13 you get some and see what happens.  You can also afford to get a few as backups in case of failure.

In my shack, I use a West Mountain Radio PG40S power gate which takes 15 volts from an old Radio Shack analog power supply, and outputs about 14.8 volts to a Anderson Power Pole power block, and keeps a Type 27 deep cycle battery charged.  From the power block I use a few of these DC-DC step down modules to convert to 5.1 volts.  I have the same setup at my home (shack is in a different location) with a smaller battery to power the PiGate development devices and a radio.  If the power fails, the battery is switched in instantly and give me enough power to supply my PiGate RMS station for a day or so, or my home development site for about 12 hours.

There are lots of solutions.  Experiment!

Mark
KD0QYN



 



On Wednesday, June 3, 2020, 12:29:02 PM CDT, Tadd KA2DEW in NC via groups.io <tadd@...> wrote:


What we need is a 9 V to 15 V DC input device which outputs 5.1v regulated to a USB socket and which delivers that voltage reliably automatically when the input voltage is applied (not like the new DROK device which requires menu manipulation to turn on the USB output).  Most of the devices that are close to these specs only put out 4.9 to 5 V which is not enough for the PI 4B.  Or, they use screw terminal outputs which is not good for the casual Raspberry PI software engineer.  Sockets are good.  
We’d further like this device to be $20 or less.  I’ve seen things which are really close to what we want for as little as a couple of dollars.  But close doesn’t count here.  It has to be 5.1 VDC and it has to be always on, and it has to take DC input.  

Would it be worth $40 to have a 3 Amp linear supply through-hole KIT that does the above?  I have a schematic for a circuit to do this and handle charging, switchover, and relay protect for a GelCel UPS and early protection alert to Raspberry PI when the battery is getting close to damaging itself.  WN8P did the schematic.  We’re pondering making and selling PCBs (for cost via ETSY) and publishing a bill-of-materials for builder purchase from DigiKey.  

The design seems expensive.  I’m just wondering if it is worth it.  The cost includes the heat sync but no housing or Gel Cel.   Dunno.  It seemed a good idea at the time.  I can do really good kit building instructions. See this page: 


  KA2DEW

On Jun 2, 2020, at 8:33 PM, Chuck M via groups.io <cam51mail@...> wrote:

I've done that as well.  On pi3 tweaked the voltage until lightning icon stayed home.

Thingiverse has various case designs for them depending on model.  Also designs to make inline fuse holder.

Can also get something like this:

KD9DVB


On Tue, Jun 2, 2020 at 7:34 PM, nb7o
<khedgepe@...> wrote:

Another solution, that I use here, is to buy a dc-dc voltage converter.  I have a 12v to 5v dc-dc converter with a usb connector on the 5v side.  I have Anderson power poles on the 12v side and I plug it into my 50a 12v power supply.  The DC-DC converter I have provides 3a of power to the PI which also helps with low voltage conditions on the pi.

 

Seven three de kevin/NB7O





Re: Noisy Pi4 - particularly on 2m

Mark Griffith
 

If you want battery backup, you need to have some sort of charger to manage the battery.  This is much more than just providing 12v power.  The PWRGate switches instantly from the power supply to the battery, not causing a Raspberry Pi reboot.  This is the most important thing to me to prevent premature SD card failure.

You can also try putting a battery maintainer as sold in Walmart and other stores that supply 1.5A at 12VDC, and attach that to a battery, and then your 12VDC to microUSB power module.  This works, I have done it in the past, but they are not very good at keeping the battery charged AND supply power to a Raspberry Pi and radio.  The battery eventually looses its charge and you don't find out about it until the power fails and your Raspberry Pis go down.  The PWRGate integrates all the parts.

You are, of course, free to design your own.  There are lots of plans online for voltage converters.

Mark
KD0QYN


On Wednesday, June 3, 2020, 1:30:46 PM CDT, Tadd KA2DEW in NC via groups.io <tadd@...> wrote:


The wet mount radio power gate costs $140??  
And I thought $40 was high. And the battery protection and charge is just one minor feature of the $40 project. 
$13 EACH to try some and see what happens.  Hmm..   

What I’m hearing is that there isn’t really a product out there that gives us the 5.1v from 12v every time one is bought and tried.  
The little wall wart thing for the Raspberry PI 4 is a good thing, but it has the wrong voltage input and no battery backup. 


On Jun 3, 2020, at 2:26 PM, Mark Griffith via groups.io <mdgriffith2003@...> wrote:

There are lots of these modules around, some are better than others.  I have used some that output 5.15 volts consistently, and some just 5.0 volts.  Some have two micro USB connectors, some do not.  I have a few of these I use now that are very reliable.  eBay is a good place to find them.

I guess for $13 you get some and see what happens.  You can also afford to get a few as backups in case of failure.

In my shack, I use a West Mountain Radio PG40S power gate which takes 15 volts from an old Radio Shack analog power supply, and outputs about 14.8 volts to a Anderson Power Pole power block, and keeps a Type 27 deep cycle battery charged.  From the power block I use a few of these DC-DC step down modules to convert to 5.1 volts.  I have the same setup at my home (shack is in a different location) with a smaller battery to power the PiGate development devices and a radio.  If the power fails, the battery is switched in instantly and give me enough power to supply my PiGate RMS station for a day or so, or my home development site for about 12 hours.

There are lots of solutions.  Experiment!

Mark
KD0QYN



 



On Wednesday, June 3, 2020, 12:29:02 PM CDT, Tadd KA2DEW in NC via groups.io <tadd@...> wrote:


What we need is a 9 V to 15 V DC input device which outputs 5.1v regulated to a USB socket and which delivers that voltage reliably automatically when the input voltage is applied (not like the new DROK device which requires menu manipulation to turn on the USB output).  Most of the devices that are close to these specs only put out 4.9 to 5 V which is not enough for the PI 4B.  Or, they use screw terminal outputs which is not good for the casual Raspberry PI software engineer.  Sockets are good.  
We’d further like this device to be $20 or less.  I’ve seen things which are really close to what we want for as little as a couple of dollars.  But close doesn’t count here.  It has to be 5.1 VDC and it has to be always on, and it has to take DC input.  

Would it be worth $40 to have a 3 Amp linear supply through-hole KIT that does the above?  I have a schematic for a circuit to do this and handle charging, switchover, and relay protect for a GelCel UPS and early protection alert to Raspberry PI when the battery is getting close to damaging itself.  WN8P did the schematic.  We’re pondering making and selling PCBs (for cost via ETSY) and publishing a bill-of-materials for builder purchase from DigiKey.  

The design seems expensive.  I’m just wondering if it is worth it.  The cost includes the heat sync but no housing or Gel Cel.   Dunno.  It seemed a good idea at the time.  I can do really good kit building instructions. See this page: 


  KA2DEW

On Jun 2, 2020, at 8:33 PM, Chuck M via groups.io <cam51mail@...> wrote:

I've done that as well.  On pi3 tweaked the voltage until lightning icon stayed home.

Thingiverse has various case designs for them depending on model.  Also designs to make inline fuse holder.

Can also get something like this:

KD9DVB


On Tue, Jun 2, 2020 at 7:34 PM, nb7o
<khedgepe@...> wrote:

Another solution, that I use here, is to buy a dc-dc voltage converter.  I have a 12v to 5v dc-dc converter with a usb connector on the 5v side.  I have Anderson power poles on the 12v side and I plug it into my 50a 12v power supply.  The DC-DC converter I have provides 3a of power to the PI which also helps with low voltage conditions on the pi.

 

Seven three de kevin/NB7O




Re: Noisy Pi4 - particularly on 2m

Jim Lange
 

I got a few adjustable dc-dc converters for my pi’s. I feed them with 13.8 volts and adjust them for 5.1 volts out then solder them to the 5 volt pins on the pi. Not elegant due to soldering direct to the pi and having an outboard converter flopping about. I let my shack or repeater site ac/dc switching worry about the 13.8 volt part. 

For my use a dc/dc converter hat that would fit between the pi and whatever else I was using would be ideal. 

Wouldn’t make a difference to me if the input was solder tabs, screw terminals or some kind of connector that wouldn’t pull apart easily. 


Sent by me


On Jun 3, 2020, at 14:30, Tadd KA2DEW in NC via groups.io <tadd@...> wrote:

The wet mount radio power gate costs $140??  
And I thought $40 was high. And the battery protection and charge is just one minor feature of the $40 project. 
$13 EACH to try some and see what happens.  Hmm..   

What I’m hearing is that there isn’t really a product out there that gives us the 5.1v from 12v every time one is bought and tried.  
The little wall wart thing for the Raspberry PI 4 is a good thing, but it has the wrong voltage input and no battery backup. 


On Jun 3, 2020, at 2:26 PM, Mark Griffith via groups.io <mdgriffith2003@...> wrote:

There are lots of these modules around, some are better than others.  I have used some that output 5.15 volts consistently, and some just 5.0 volts.  Some have two micro USB connectors, some do not.  I have a few of these I use now that are very reliable.  eBay is a good place to find them.

I guess for $13 you get some and see what happens.  You can also afford to get a few as backups in case of failure.

In my shack, I use a West Mountain Radio PG40S power gate which takes 15 volts from an old Radio Shack analog power supply, and outputs about 14.8 volts to a Anderson Power Pole power block, and keeps a Type 27 deep cycle battery charged.  From the power block I use a few of these DC-DC step down modules to convert to 5.1 volts.  I have the same setup at my home (shack is in a different location) with a smaller battery to power the PiGate development devices and a radio.  If the power fails, the battery is switched in instantly and give me enough power to supply my PiGate RMS station for a day or so, or my home development site for about 12 hours.

There are lots of solutions.  Experiment!

Mark
KD0QYN



 



On Wednesday, June 3, 2020, 12:29:02 PM CDT, Tadd KA2DEW in NC via groups.io <tadd@...> wrote:


What we need is a 9 V to 15 V DC input device which outputs 5.1v regulated to a USB socket and which delivers that voltage reliably automatically when the input voltage is applied (not like the new DROK device which requires menu manipulation to turn on the USB output).  Most of the devices that are close to these specs only put out 4.9 to 5 V which is not enough for the PI 4B.  Or, they use screw terminal outputs which is not good for the casual Raspberry PI software engineer.  Sockets are good.  
We’d further like this device to be $20 or less.  I’ve seen things which are really close to what we want for as little as a couple of dollars.  But close doesn’t count here.  It has to be 5.1 VDC and it has to be always on, and it has to take DC input.  

Would it be worth $40 to have a 3 Amp linear supply through-hole KIT that does the above?  I have a schematic for a circuit to do this and handle charging, switchover, and relay protect for a GelCel UPS and early protection alert to Raspberry PI when the battery is getting close to damaging itself.  WN8P did the schematic.  We’re pondering making and selling PCBs (for cost via ETSY) and publishing a bill-of-materials for builder purchase from DigiKey.  

The design seems expensive.  I’m just wondering if it is worth it.  The cost includes the heat sync but no housing or Gel Cel.   Dunno.  It seemed a good idea at the time.  I can do really good kit building instructions. See this page: 


  KA2DEW

On Jun 2, 2020, at 8:33 PM, Chuck M via groups.io <cam51mail@...> wrote:

I've done that as well.  On pi3 tweaked the voltage until lightning icon stayed home.

Thingiverse has various case designs for them depending on model.  Also designs to make inline fuse holder.

Can also get something like this:

KD9DVB


On Tue, Jun 2, 2020 at 7:34 PM, nb7o
<khedgepe@...> wrote:

Another solution, that I use here, is to buy a dc-dc voltage converter.  I have a 12v to 5v dc-dc converter with a usb connector on the 5v side.  I have Anderson power poles on the 12v side and I plug it into my 50a 12v power supply.  The DC-DC converter I have provides 3a of power to the PI which also helps with low voltage conditions on the pi.

 

Seven three de kevin/NB7O




Re: Noisy Pi4 - particularly on 2m

Hank Riley
 

Mark,

Could you please provide a link or two just to give us a clue about what you're talking about specifically ?  There are so many devices on Ebay it would be really helpful to narrow it down.

Hank
_________________________________________________________

On Jun 3, 2020, at 2:26 PM, Mark Griffith wrote:

There are lots of these modules around, some are better than others.  I have used some that output 5.15 volts consistently, and some just 5.0 volts.  Some have two micro USB connectors, some do not.  I have a few of these I use now that are very reliable.  eBay is a good place to find them.

I guess for $13 you get some and see what happens.  


Re: Noisy Pi4 - particularly on 2m

 

The wet mount radio power gate costs $140??  
And I thought $40 was high. And the battery protection and charge is just one minor feature of the $40 project. 
$13 EACH to try some and see what happens.  Hmm..   

What I’m hearing is that there isn’t really a product out there that gives us the 5.1v from 12v every time one is bought and tried.  
The little wall wart thing for the Raspberry PI 4 is a good thing, but it has the wrong voltage input and no battery backup. 


On Jun 3, 2020, at 2:26 PM, Mark Griffith via groups.io <mdgriffith2003@...> wrote:

There are lots of these modules around, some are better than others.  I have used some that output 5.15 volts consistently, and some just 5.0 volts.  Some have two micro USB connectors, some do not.  I have a few of these I use now that are very reliable.  eBay is a good place to find them.

I guess for $13 you get some and see what happens.  You can also afford to get a few as backups in case of failure.

In my shack, I use a West Mountain Radio PG40S power gate which takes 15 volts from an old Radio Shack analog power supply, and outputs about 14.8 volts to a Anderson Power Pole power block, and keeps a Type 27 deep cycle battery charged.  From the power block I use a few of these DC-DC step down modules to convert to 5.1 volts.  I have the same setup at my home (shack is in a different location) with a smaller battery to power the PiGate development devices and a radio.  If the power fails, the battery is switched in instantly and give me enough power to supply my PiGate RMS station for a day or so, or my home development site for about 12 hours.

There are lots of solutions.  Experiment!

Mark
KD0QYN



 



On Wednesday, June 3, 2020, 12:29:02 PM CDT, Tadd KA2DEW in NC via groups.io <tadd@...> wrote:


What we need is a 9 V to 15 V DC input device which outputs 5.1v regulated to a USB socket and which delivers that voltage reliably automatically when the input voltage is applied (not like the new DROK device which requires menu manipulation to turn on the USB output).  Most of the devices that are close to these specs only put out 4.9 to 5 V which is not enough for the PI 4B.  Or, they use screw terminal outputs which is not good for the casual Raspberry PI software engineer.  Sockets are good.  
We’d further like this device to be $20 or less.  I’ve seen things which are really close to what we want for as little as a couple of dollars.  But close doesn’t count here.  It has to be 5.1 VDC and it has to be always on, and it has to take DC input.  

Would it be worth $40 to have a 3 Amp linear supply through-hole KIT that does the above?  I have a schematic for a circuit to do this and handle charging, switchover, and relay protect for a GelCel UPS and early protection alert to Raspberry PI when the battery is getting close to damaging itself.  WN8P did the schematic.  We’re pondering making and selling PCBs (for cost via ETSY) and publishing a bill-of-materials for builder purchase from DigiKey.  

The design seems expensive.  I’m just wondering if it is worth it.  The cost includes the heat sync but no housing or Gel Cel.   Dunno.  It seemed a good idea at the time.  I can do really good kit building instructions. See this page: 


  KA2DEW

On Jun 2, 2020, at 8:33 PM, Chuck M via groups.io <cam51mail@...> wrote:

I've done that as well.  On pi3 tweaked the voltage until lightning icon stayed home.

Thingiverse has various case designs for them depending on model.  Also designs to make inline fuse holder.

Can also get something like this:

KD9DVB


On Tue, Jun 2, 2020 at 7:34 PM, nb7o
<khedgepe@...> wrote:

Another solution, that I use here, is to buy a dc-dc voltage converter.  I have a 12v to 5v dc-dc converter with a usb connector on the 5v side.  I have Anderson power poles on the 12v side and I plug it into my 50a 12v power supply.  The DC-DC converter I have provides 3a of power to the PI which also helps with low voltage conditions on the pi.

 

Seven three de kevin/NB7O




Re: Noisy Pi4 - particularly on 2m

Mark Griffith
 

There are lots of these modules around, some are better than others.  I have used some that output 5.15 volts consistently, and some just 5.0 volts.  Some have two micro USB connectors, some do not.  I have a few of these I use now that are very reliable.  eBay is a good place to find them.

I guess for $13 you get some and see what happens.  You can also afford to get a few as backups in case of failure.

In my shack, I use a West Mountain Radio PG40S power gate which takes 15 volts from an old Radio Shack analog power supply, and outputs about 14.8 volts to a Anderson Power Pole power block, and keeps a Type 27 deep cycle battery charged.  From the power block I use a few of these DC-DC step down modules to convert to 5.1 volts.  I have the same setup at my home (shack is in a different location) with a smaller battery to power the PiGate development devices and a radio.  If the power fails, the battery is switched in instantly and give me enough power to supply my PiGate RMS station for a day or so, or my home development site for about 12 hours.

There are lots of solutions.  Experiment!

Mark
KD0QYN



 



On Wednesday, June 3, 2020, 12:29:02 PM CDT, Tadd KA2DEW in NC via groups.io <tadd@...> wrote:


What we need is a 9 V to 15 V DC input device which outputs 5.1v regulated to a USB socket and which delivers that voltage reliably automatically when the input voltage is applied (not like the new DROK device which requires menu manipulation to turn on the USB output).  Most of the devices that are close to these specs only put out 4.9 to 5 V which is not enough for the PI 4B.  Or, they use screw terminal outputs which is not good for the casual Raspberry PI software engineer.  Sockets are good.  
We’d further like this device to be $20 or less.  I’ve seen things which are really close to what we want for as little as a couple of dollars.  But close doesn’t count here.  It has to be 5.1 VDC and it has to be always on, and it has to take DC input.  

Would it be worth $40 to have a 3 Amp linear supply through-hole KIT that does the above?  I have a schematic for a circuit to do this and handle charging, switchover, and relay protect for a GelCel UPS and early protection alert to Raspberry PI when the battery is getting close to damaging itself.  WN8P did the schematic.  We’re pondering making and selling PCBs (for cost via ETSY) and publishing a bill-of-materials for builder purchase from DigiKey.  

The design seems expensive.  I’m just wondering if it is worth it.  The cost includes the heat sync but no housing or Gel Cel.   Dunno.  It seemed a good idea at the time.  I can do really good kit building instructions. See this page: 


  KA2DEW

On Jun 2, 2020, at 8:33 PM, Chuck M via groups.io <cam51mail@...> wrote:

I've done that as well.  On pi3 tweaked the voltage until lightning icon stayed home.

Thingiverse has various case designs for them depending on model.  Also designs to make inline fuse holder.

Can also get something like this:

KD9DVB


On Tue, Jun 2, 2020 at 7:34 PM, nb7o
<khedgepe@...> wrote:

Another solution, that I use here, is to buy a dc-dc voltage converter.  I have a 12v to 5v dc-dc converter with a usb connector on the 5v side.  I have Anderson power poles on the 12v side and I plug it into my 50a 12v power supply.  The DC-DC converter I have provides 3a of power to the PI which also helps with low voltage conditions on the pi.

 

Seven three de kevin/NB7O



Re: Noisy Pi4 - particularly on 2m

N3RDR
 

Curious. How about a small battery pack that provides the required output and is kept charged via not so ideal chargers? Is battery life even a concern in that scenario?

Carlos
N3RDR

Sent from my 📲

On Jun 3, 2020, at 1:23 PM, Tadd KA2DEW in NC via groups.io <tadd@...> wrote:

What we need is a 9 V to 15 V DC input device which outputs 5.1v regulated to a USB socket and which delivers that voltage reliably automatically when the input voltage is applied (not like the new DROK device which requires menu manipulation to turn on the USB output).  Most of the devices that are close to these specs only put out 4.9 to 5 V which is not enough for the PI 4B.  Or, they use screw terminal outputs which is not good for the casual Raspberry PI software engineer.  Sockets are good.  
We’d further like this device to be $20 or less.  I’ve seen things which are really close to what we want for as little as a couple of dollars.  But close doesn’t count here.  It has to be 5.1 VDC and it has to be always on, and it has to take DC input.  

Would it be worth $40 to have a 3 Amp linear supply through-hole KIT that does the above?  I have a schematic for a circuit to do this and handle charging, switchover, and relay protect for a GelCel UPS and early protection alert to Raspberry PI when the battery is getting close to damaging itself.  WN8P did the schematic.  We’re pondering making and selling PCBs (for cost via ETSY) and publishing a bill-of-materials for builder purchase from DigiKey.  

The design seems expensive.  I’m just wondering if it is worth it.  The cost includes the heat sync but no housing or Gel Cel.   Dunno.  It seemed a good idea at the time.  I can do really good kit building instructions. See this page: 


  KA2DEW

On Jun 2, 2020, at 8:33 PM, Chuck M via groups.io <cam51mail@...> wrote:

I've done that as well.  On pi3 tweaked the voltage until lightning icon stayed home.

Thingiverse has various case designs for them depending on model.  Also designs to make inline fuse holder.

Can also get something like this:

KD9DVB


On Tue, Jun 2, 2020 at 7:34 PM, nb7o
<khedgepe@...> wrote:

Another solution, that I use here, is to buy a dc-dc voltage converter.  I have a 12v to 5v dc-dc converter with a usb connector on the 5v side.  I have Anderson power poles on the 12v side and I plug it into my 50a 12v power supply.  The DC-DC converter I have provides 3a of power to the PI which also helps with low voltage conditions on the pi.

 

Seven three de kevin/NB7O



Re: Noisy Pi4 - particularly on 2m

 

What we need is a 9 V to 15 V DC input device which outputs 5.1v regulated to a USB socket and which delivers that voltage reliably automatically when the input voltage is applied (not like the new DROK device which requires menu manipulation to turn on the USB output).  Most of the devices that are close to these specs only put out 4.9 to 5 V which is not enough for the PI 4B.  Or, they use screw terminal outputs which is not good for the casual Raspberry PI software engineer.  Sockets are good.  
We’d further like this device to be $20 or less.  I’ve seen things which are really close to what we want for as little as a couple of dollars.  But close doesn’t count here.  It has to be 5.1 VDC and it has to be always on, and it has to take DC input.  

Would it be worth $40 to have a 3 Amp linear supply through-hole KIT that does the above?  I have a schematic for a circuit to do this and handle charging, switchover, and relay protect for a GelCel UPS and early protection alert to Raspberry PI when the battery is getting close to damaging itself.  WN8P did the schematic.  We’re pondering making and selling PCBs (for cost via ETSY) and publishing a bill-of-materials for builder purchase from DigiKey.  

The design seems expensive.  I’m just wondering if it is worth it.  The cost includes the heat sync but no housing or Gel Cel.   Dunno.  It seemed a good idea at the time.  I can do really good kit building instructions. See this page: 


  KA2DEW

On Jun 2, 2020, at 8:33 PM, Chuck M via groups.io <cam51mail@...> wrote:

I've done that as well.  On pi3 tweaked the voltage until lightning icon stayed home.

Thingiverse has various case designs for them depending on model.  Also designs to make inline fuse holder.

Can also get something like this:

KD9DVB


On Tue, Jun 2, 2020 at 7:34 PM, nb7o
<khedgepe@...> wrote:

Another solution, that I use here, is to buy a dc-dc voltage converter.  I have a 12v to 5v dc-dc converter with a usb connector on the 5v side.  I have Anderson power poles on the 12v side and I plug it into my 50a 12v power supply.  The DC-DC converter I have provides 3a of power to the PI which also helps with low voltage conditions on the pi.

 

Seven three de kevin/NB7O