Date   

Packing House Photos

Bob Chaparro
 

Courtesy of Tom Cataldo, potos from "JWTCA":

https://www.flickr.com/photos/55273381@N06/albums/72157628646819449/page1

The packing houses begin about two-thirds of the way down on Page 1.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator


Packing House Photos

Bob Chaparro
 


Courtesy of Tom Cataldo, potos from "JWTCA":

https://www.flickr.com/photos/55273381@N06/albums/72157628646819449/page1

The packing houses begin about two-thirds of the way down on Page 1.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator


PFE El Paso Icing Platform

Bob Chaparro
 


A 1960 photo:

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/catalog/ss:20988416

Note the bags of salt and the bridges (foreground) used to span the gap between the car roofs and the platform.

Also shows Southern Pacific El Paso Up Town Yards A-B-C and D and Yard Masters Tower Office.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator


PFE El Paso Icing Platform

Bob Chaparro
 

A 1960 photo:

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/catalog/ss:20988416

Note the bags of salt and the bridges (foreground) used to span the gap between the car roofs and the platform.

Also shows Southern Pacific El Paso Up Town Yards A-B-C and D and Yard Masters Tower Office.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator


Fund Raising Appeal To Save PFE/WP 55069

Bob Chaparro
 

Feather River Rail Society video:

https://www.gofundme.com/save-wp-pfe-reefer-55069

Click on video.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator


Fund Raising Appeal To Save PFE/WP 55069

Bob Chaparro
 

Feather River Rail Society video:

https://www.gofundme.com/save-wp-pfe-reefer-55069

Click on video.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator


Re: McDermont Packing House, Riverside

Bruce Hendrick
 

Thanks, Mel. The director has a very strong sense of preserving history and I would not be surprised to see some photo or artifacts displayed in the theater, perhaps in the lobby (former office area). 


On Apr 26, 2019, at 5:13 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

bruce:
thanks for sharing, too bad they couldn't
turn into an industry muesum
mel perry

On Fri, Apr 26, 2019, 5:07 PM Bruce Hendrick <brucehendrick@...> wrote:
On April 25 members of the Corona Model Railroad Society ventured via Metrolink to the historic depot area of downtown Riverside to do some research on that part of our club layout. Our first stop was the long boarded up McDermont Fruit Company packing house near Ninth and Vine Street. While we were viewing the exterior we were surprised to be approached by someone who began sharing the history of the building. He turned out to be the head of the historic redevelopment for the area. After we identified ourselves as doing historic research for the club he invited us to tour the interior. I thought some of the pictures I took might be of interest.

Some of the points he made included that the building was extremely well-built in 1930 with ahead-of-its-time construction such as rebar. Without the need for retrofitting it is considered Seismically sound. The building remains cool even in summer without the need for AC. Except for the removal of the packinghouse equipment the interior is unchanged. Despite a somewhat rough-looking appearance it was reported that the building is actually in very good shape and needs only a facelift type restoration for the most part. All existing materials will be reused in the restoration.

McDermont will be converted into a live theater with the interior being left largely unchanged. The very interesting bracing supports of the sawtooth windows will remain exposed. It was indicated the restoration will take about a year before the theater can open but no start date was indicated. When finished it is hoped the theater and a Pacific Electric inspired “people mover” and new bike paths will draw people down to the Depot District.

Riverside should be commended for preserving and re-purposing many of the historic buildings in this area, including the Union Pacific depot-now a Mexican restaurant, the Santa Fe depot-now a real estate company, the old Sutherland packing house-now the Ol’ Spaghetti Factory, among others.


Except for the removal of the Packing House equipment the interior is unchanged.


The framing & supports for the sawtooth windows will remain exposed to theatre-goers.


Four sawtooth windows.


The blue interior wall separates the small office area from the main sorting floor.


The original floor will be restored & reused.


Detail where sawtooth supports meet the side wall.


In addition to helping cool the building the sawtooth windows provide good lighting.


Above the exterior door “Sunkist” can still be read on the orange despite many coats of paint.

The McDermont exterior also remains unchanged and in good shape nearly 90 years after completion.

Bruce Hendrick, CMRS President






Re: McDermont Packing House, Riverside

mel perry
 

bruce:
thanks for sharing, too bad they couldn't
turn into an industry muesum
mel perry

On Fri, Apr 26, 2019, 5:07 PM Bruce Hendrick <brucehendrick@...> wrote:
On April 25 members of the Corona Model Railroad Society ventured via Metrolink to the historic depot area of downtown Riverside to do some research on that part of our club layout. Our first stop was the long boarded up McDermont Fruit Company packing house near Ninth and Vine Street. While we were viewing the exterior we were surprised to be approached by someone who began sharing the history of the building. He turned out to be the head of the historic redevelopment for the area. After we identified ourselves as doing historic research for the club he invited us to tour the interior. I thought some of the pictures I took might be of interest.

Some of the points he made included that the building was extremely well-built in 1930 with ahead-of-its-time construction such as rebar. Without the need for retrofitting it is considered Seismically sound. The building remains cool even in summer without the need for AC. Except for the removal of the packinghouse equipment the interior is unchanged. Despite a somewhat rough-looking appearance it was reported that the building is actually in very good shape and needs only a facelift type restoration for the most part. All existing materials will be reused in the restoration.

McDermont will be converted into a live theater with the interior being left largely unchanged. The very interesting bracing supports of the sawtooth windows will remain exposed. It was indicated the restoration will take about a year before the theater can open but no start date was indicated. When finished it is hoped the theater and a Pacific Electric inspired “people mover” and new bike paths will draw people down to the Depot District.

Riverside should be commended for preserving and re-purposing many of the historic buildings in this area, including the Union Pacific depot-now a Mexican restaurant, the Santa Fe depot-now a real estate company, the old Sutherland packing house-now the Ol’ Spaghetti Factory, among others.


Except for the removal of the Packing House equipment the interior is unchanged.


The framing & supports for the sawtooth windows will remain exposed to theatre-goers.


Four sawtooth windows.


The blue interior wall separates the small office area from the main sorting floor.


The original floor will be restored & reused.


Detail where sawtooth supports meet the side wall.


In addition to helping cool the building the sawtooth windows provide good lighting.


Above the exterior door “Sunkist” can still be read on the orange despite many coats of paint.

The McDermont exterior also remains unchanged and in good shape nearly 90 years after completion.

Bruce Hendrick, CMRS President






McDermont Packing House, Riverside

Bruce Hendrick
 

On April 25 members of the Corona Model Railroad Society ventured via Metrolink to the historic depot area of downtown Riverside to do some research on that part of our club layout. Our first stop was the long boarded up McDermont Fruit Company packing house near Ninth and Vine Street. While we were viewing the exterior we were surprised to be approached by someone who began sharing the history of the building. He turned out to be the head of the historic redevelopment for the area. After we identified ourselves as doing historic research for the club he invited us to tour the interior. I thought some of the pictures I took might be of interest.

Some of the points he made included that the building was extremely well-built in 1930 with ahead-of-its-time construction such as rebar. Without the need for retrofitting it is considered Seismically sound. The building remains cool even in summer without the need for AC. Except for the removal of the packinghouse equipment the interior is unchanged. Despite a somewhat rough-looking appearance it was reported that the building is actually in very good shape and needs only a facelift type restoration for the most part. All existing materials will be reused in the restoration.

McDermont will be converted into a live theater with the interior being left largely unchanged. The very interesting bracing supports of the sawtooth windows will remain exposed. It was indicated the restoration will take about a year before the theater can open but no start date was indicated. When finished it is hoped the theater and a Pacific Electric inspired “people mover” and new bike paths will draw people down to the Depot District.

Riverside should be commended for preserving and re-purposing many of the historic buildings in this area, including the Union Pacific depot-now a Mexican restaurant, the Santa Fe depot-now a real estate company, the old Sutherland packing house-now the Ol’ Spaghetti Factory, among others.


Except for the removal of the Packing House equipment the interior is unchanged.


The framing & supports for the sawtooth windows will remain exposed to theatre-goers.


Four sawtooth windows.


The blue interior wall separates the small office area from the main sorting floor.


The original floor will be restored & reused.


Detail where sawtooth supports meet the side wall.


In addition to helping cool the building the sawtooth windows provide good lighting.


Above the exterior door “Sunkist” can still be read on the orange despite many coats of paint.

The McDermont exterior also remains unchanged and in good shape nearly 90 years after completion.

Bruce Hendrick, CMRS President


Re: Ink-On-Linen Drawing: SFRD Rr-P Reefer (Garland Ventilators)

Bob Chaparro
 

Also note that on this drawing the reefer has Garland ventilators. The note on the drawing says, "Omit On Rebuilt Cars" and points to these ventilators.

That would seem to indicate the railroad was not satisfied with their performance.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator


Re: Ink-On-Linen Drawing: SFRD Rr-P Reefer (Garland Ventilators)

Bob Chaparro
 

Also note that on this drawing the reefer has Garland ventilators. The note on the drawing says, "Omit On Rebuilt Cars" and points to these ventilators.


That would seem to indicate the railroad was not satisfied with their performance.


Bob Chaparro

Moderator


Ink-On-Linen Drawing: SFRD Rr-P Reefer

Bob Chaparro
 

Ink-On-Linen Drawing: SFRD Rr-P Reefer

https://archive.org/details/cscrm_000190

Click on blurry image to view it, click again to enlarge it.

Description: "AT&SF ink-on-linen drawing 2 17 C 601, dated November 6, 1908, with modifications to 1916, provides a side elevation, end view and lettering for a Class Rr H [Actually Rr-P) refrigerator car."

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Ink-On-Linen Drawing: SFRD Rr-P Reefer

Bob Chaparro
 

Ink-On-Linen Drawing: SFRD Rr-P Reefer

https://archive.org/details/cscrm_000190

Click on blurry image to view it, click again to enlarge it.

Description: "AT&SF ink-on-linen drawing 2 17 C 601, dated November 6, 1908, with modifications to 1916, provides a side elevation, end view and lettering for a Class Rr H [Actually Rr-P) refrigerator car."

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Lucky Coincidence

Stuart O'Guinn
 

Thanks, Bob,
Look forward to hearing more.  I am going to make about fifty smudge pots for my orchard area.  As with the orange trees they will be in both a scale size, and a smaller size to force perspective.
Stu

On Tue, Apr 16, 2019, at 9:51 PM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io wrote:

Today I attended the bi-monthly meeting of the Hemet Chapter of the Retired Employees of Orange County. At my table were two persons I had not talked with before. By some lucky coincidence both had connections to the citrus industry.

As we talked one of them remarked that he grew-up in Upland. When he said that the first thing I asked was, "Did you smudge?" He said he did and recounted a few stories. Upon hearing that the other person told me his father managed one of the packing houses in Etiwanda.

I now have two new subjects to interview in the coming weeks. I'll post whatever interesting information results from the interviews.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator



Lucky Coincidence

Bob Chaparro
 

Today I attended the bi-monthly meeting of the Hemet Chapter of the Retired Employees of Orange County. At my table were two persons I had not talked with before. By some lucky coincidence both had connections to the citrus industry.

As we talked one of them remarked that he grew-up in Upland. When he said that the first thing I asked was, "Did you smudge?" He said he did and recounted a few stories. Upon hearing that the other person told me his father managed one of the packing houses in Etiwanda.

I now have two new subjects to interview in the coming weeks. I'll post whatever interesting information results from the interviews.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator


Lucky Coincidence

Bob Chaparro
 


Today I attended the bi-monthly meeting of the Hemet Chapter of the Retired Employees of Orange County. At my table were two persons I had not talked with before. By some lucky coincidence both had connections to the citrus industry.

 

As we talked one of them remarked that he grew-up in Upland. When he said that the first thing I asked was, "Did you smudge?" He said he did and recounted a few stories. Upon hearing that the other person told me his father managed one of the packing houses in Etiwanda.

 

I now have two new subjects to interview in the coming weeks. I'll post whatever interesting information results from the interviews.

 

Bob Chaparro

Moderator


Re: SFRD Refrigerator Car With Garland Ventilators

Bob Miller <cajonpass02@...>
 

Some Westerfield kits had Bohn ventilators, which are larger.


On Apr 16, 2019, at 12:38 AM, Paul Nash pvn99@... [citrusmodeling] <citrusmodeling@...> wrote:

 

One of the craftsman ATSF reefer kits came with those ventilators.. Can’t recall which it was.
Paul Nash 

.
Shared images can be seen at www.pbase.com/paulv99k or at www.paulv99.zenfolio.com


Re: SFRD Refrigerator Car With Garland Ventilators

Paul V Nash Jr.
 

One of the craftsman ATSF reefer kits came with those ventilators.. Can’t recall which it was.
Paul Nash 

.
Shared images can be seen at www.pbase.com/paulv99k or at www.paulv99.zenfolio.com


SFRD Refrigerator Car With Garland Ventilators

Bob Chaparro
 

Here is a link to an undated photo of a Texas & Pacific freight yard:

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth853399/m1/1/?q=boxcar

If you zoom the photo and look to the left you'll see a Santa Fe refrigerator car with Garland ventilators on its roof. This car may be either a Class Rr-O or

Rr-P reefer. Some cars in both classes were equipped with Garland ventilators. The photo probably was taken in 1908 or later as that is when some Rr-O reefers received the Garland ventilators as a retrofit.

Use these links to view an illustration of this device and another roof photo from a wreck scene:

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup/attachment/165/0/Garland%20Car%20Ventilator.png

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup/message/164?p=,,,20,0,0,0::Created,,garland,20,2,0,18896613

Below are two early industry articles about Garland ventilators.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

++++

From The Railway and Engineering Review, Volume 48

February 22, 1908

The Garland Car Ventilator

The question of ventilation of passenger car equipment has been given increasing prominence recently, and several discussions of the subject have brought out the paramount importance to the passengers of an adequate supply of fresh air. Systems and devices in considerable variety have been advocated to accomplish this end, some of them impractical, some inefficient, and some well calculated to meet the end in view. The Garland ventilator which has been before the railroad public for about three years seems to be of this last class, and it has now met with so wide an introduction that a description of the device and its principles of operation will be of some interest.

Tills ventilator is the invention of T. H. Garland, general agent refrigerator service, Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R. R. at Chicago, and it is handled commercially before the market by the Garland Car Ventilator, 902 Medinah building, Chicago. In its form and the method of applying it, the ventilator is inconspicuous and compact...

Application of Garland Ventilator to Refrigerator Cars.

The slightest investigation into the handling of fruits, vegetables and other perishable freight In refrigerator cars will reveal the necessity of providing better car ventilation. Hundreds of carloads of berries, peaches, oranges and other fruits are damaged every year on account of Insufficient ventilation in refrigerator cars. The upper tiers in the cars become soft or moldy, due to the warm air and gases that accumulate In the upper part of the car and have no means of escape or being drawn off. Roads handling this class of traffic are called upon to pay thousands of dollars each year on account of poorly ventilated refrigerator cars. To prevent these heavy losses and enable the roads to get shipments through to destination in good condition, an efficient ventilator is a prime necessity.

The construction of the ventilator as applied to this use is practically the same as that for passenger equipment...

The ventilator is applied to the roofs of refrigerator cars in the center of the car between the doors...

According to the claims of the Inventor anemometer tests have shown that when the car Is running at a speed of thirty miles per hour, a ventilator of the size shown in the illustrations is capable of exhausting 10,000 cu. ft. of air per hour from the car. As the refrigerator cars thus far equipped have each two of these ventilators, it follows that the total exhaust may be 20,000 cu. ft. per hour. If the car body contains 2000 cu. ft. of air, which is approximately correct, this would mean that all the air in the car would be exhausted ten times per hour. A damper or regulator is provided at the inner end of the opening into the car, so that the ventilation of refrigerator cars can be regulated according to the requirements of the load.

For two years refrigerator cars equipped with this ventilator have been in service. The many tests made are said to show that the warm air and gases that gather In the upper parts of the cars are all drawn off by the ventilator. When cars are under ice the warm air and gases are forced by the cold air from the ice tanks to the center and upper part of the car and remain there unless drawn off at that point by ventilators. The results with ventilation show that when cars are under refrigeration, the same, or nearly the same temperature can be maintained in the upper part of the car as at the bottom. By producing good refrigeration throughout the car, the losses mentioned are prevented.

++++++++

Ice & Refrigeration

March 1910

A new refrigerator car with heating and ventilating apparatus was exhibited at the La Salle Street railway station, Chicago, the last week of February. The distinctive feature of this car is that underneath the removable slatted floor of the car are rows of piping through which the meltage from the ice flows in warm weather, adding thus to the refrigerating service of the ice in the bunkers, while in cold weather exhaust steam from the engine is admitted and serves to keep the contents of the car from all danger of injury by frost. The pipe is so trapped that the ice water or the steam, as the case may be, is automatically ejected after the purpose has been accomplished. It requires no attention except connection of steam inlet with the steam line of train. Moreover in the ceiling of the car are two openings about a foot square each, provided with beveled stops and connecting on roof of car with a Garland ventilator (described in former issues of ICE AND. REFRIGERATION). These ventilators are opened or closed from the car roof by a lever suitably marked. The car has thus a combined refrigerating, heating and ventilating apparatus, which takes up no extra space within the ear and requires exceedingly little attention and no skilled attention. The ventilating features coupled with the refrigeration from the ice water in the pipes beneath the slats on the floor, result, it is claimed, in securing an equable temperature in all parts of the car. The device is the invention of T. H. Garland, refrigerator car traffic manager of the Burlington railway system, who was also the inventor of the Garland ventilator, which is now extensively used in both passenger and freight cars.


SFRD Refrigerator Car With Garland Ventilators

Bob Chaparro
 


Here is a link to an undated photo of a Texas & Pacific freight yard:

 

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth853399/m1/1/?q=boxcar

 

If you zoom the photo and look to the left you'll see a Santa Fe refrigerator car with Garland ventilators on its roof. This car may be either a Class Rr-O or

Rr-P reefer. Some cars in both classes were equipped with Garland ventilators. The photo probably was taken in 1908 or later as that is when some Rr-O reefers received the Garland ventilators as a retrofit.

 

Use these links to view an illustration of this device and another roof photo from a wreck scene:

 

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup/attachment/165/0/Garland%20Car%20Ventilator.png

 

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup/message/164?p=,,,20,0,0,0::Created,,garland,20,2,0,18896613

 

Below are two early industry articles about Garland ventilators.

 

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

++++

From The Railway and Engineering Review, Volume 48

February 22, 1908

 

The Garland Car Ventilator

 

The question of ventilation of passenger car equipment has been given increasing prominence recently, and several discussions of the subject have brought out the paramount importance to the passengers of an adequate supply of fresh air. Systems and devices in considerable variety have been advocated to accomplish this end, some of them impractical, some inefficient, and some well calculated to meet the end in view. The Garland ventilator which has been before the railroad public for about three years seems to be of this last class, and it has now met with so wide an introduction that a description of the device and its principles of operation will be of some interest.

 

Tills ventilator is the invention of T. H. Garland, general agent refrigerator service, Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R. R. at Chicago, and it is handled commercially before the market by the Garland Car Ventilator, 902 Medinah building, Chicago. In its form and the method of applying it, the ventilator is inconspicuous and compact...

 

Application of Garland Ventilator to Refrigerator Cars.

 

The slightest investigation into the handling of fruits, vegetables and other perishable freight In refrigerator cars will reveal the necessity of providing better car ventilation. Hundreds of carloads of berries, peaches, oranges and other fruits are damaged every year on account of Insufficient ventilation in refrigerator cars. The upper tiers in the cars become soft or moldy, due to the warm air and gases that accumulate In the upper part of the car and have no means of escape or being drawn off. Roads handling this class of traffic are called upon to pay thousands of dollars each year on account of poorly ventilated refrigerator cars. To prevent these heavy losses and enable the roads to get shipments through to destination in good condition, an efficient ventilator is a prime necessity.

 

The construction of the ventilator as applied to this use is practically the same as that for passenger equipment...

 

The ventilator is applied to the roofs of refrigerator cars in the center of the car between the doors...

 

According to the claims of the Inventor anemometer tests have shown that when the car Is running at a speed of thirty miles per hour, a ventilator of the size shown in the illustrations is capable of exhausting 10,000 cu. ft. of air per hour from the car. As the refrigerator cars thus far equipped have each two of these ventilators, it follows that the total exhaust may be 20,000 cu. ft. per hour. If the car body contains 2000 cu. ft. of air, which is approximately correct, this would mean that all the air in the car would be exhausted ten times per hour. A damper or regulator is provided at the inner end of the opening into the car, so that the ventilation of refrigerator cars can be regulated according to the requirements of the load.

 

For two years refrigerator cars equipped with this ventilator have been in service. The many tests made are said to show that the warm air and gases that gather In the upper parts of the cars are all drawn off by the ventilator. When cars are under ice the warm air and gases are forced by the cold air from the ice tanks to the center and upper part of the car and remain there unless drawn off at that point by ventilators. The results with ventilation show that when cars are under refrigeration, the same, or nearly the same temperature can be maintained in the upper part of the car as at the bottom. By producing good refrigeration throughout the car, the losses mentioned are prevented.

 

++++++++

Ice & Refrigeration

March 1910

 

A new refrigerator car with heating and ventilating apparatus was exhibited at the La Salle Street railway station, Chicago, the last week of February. The distinctive feature of this car is that underneath the removable slatted floor of the car are rows of piping through which the meltage from the ice flows in warm weather, adding thus to the refrigerating service of the ice in the bunkers, while in cold weather exhaust steam from the engine is admitted and serves to keep the contents of the car from all danger of injury by frost. The pipe is so trapped that the ice water or the steam, as the case may be, is automatically ejected after the purpose has been accomplished. It requires no attention except connection of steam inlet with the steam line of train. Moreover in the ceiling of the car are two openings about a foot square each, provided with beveled stops and connecting on roof of car with a Garland ventilator (described in former issues of ICE AND. REFRIGERATION). These ventilators are opened or closed from the car roof by a lever suitably marked. The car has thus a combined refrigerating, heating and ventilating apparatus, which takes up no extra space within the ear and requires exceedingly little attention and no skilled attention. The ventilating features coupled with the refrigeration from the ice water in the pipes beneath the slats on the floor, result, it is claimed, in securing an equable temperature in all parts of the car. The device is the invention of T. H. Garland, refrigerator car traffic manager of the Burlington railway system, who was also the inventor of the Garland ventilator, which is now extensively used in both passenger and freight cars.

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