Topics

Baristers

Andy G4JNT
 

I know the spelling is different, but was sitting in a coffee shop this morning being served by a 'Barista' .    Seeing this I suddenly remembered once encountering a device back in the old valve days that someone told me was a Barister   (I vaguely recall it was spelt with one 'r' unlike the legal person).

All I can remember is that it had a filament that glowed dimly.  Suggesting it may be some sort of current limit or stabilisation device?

Can anyone of that era remember what a barister was and even prove my memory isn't wandering.

Google is no help; it keeps wanting to correct the spelling to show legal types or coffee experts.

Neil Smith G4DBN
 

I still have a couple of ancient ones in 4-pin envelopes.  Barreters (sometimes with two 't's) are positive tempco filaments which provide a constant current.

http://g3ynh.info/valves/var/barr/index.html

Neil G4DBN

On 17/09/2019 11:51, Andy TALBOT wrote:
I know the spelling is different, but was sitting in a coffee shop this morning being served by a 'Barista' .    Seeing this I suddenly remembered once encountering a device back in the old valve days that someone told me was a Barister   (I vaguely recall it was spelt with one 'r' unlike the legal person).

All I can remember is that it had a filament that glowed dimly.  Suggesting it may be some sort of current limit or stabilisation device?

Can anyone of that era remember what a barister was and even prove my memory isn't wandering.

Google is no help; it keeps wanting to correct the spelling to show legal types or coffee experts.

Martin Sole
 

I thought that was something James Bond carried?


On 17/09/2019 17:57, Neil Smith G4DBN wrote:

I still have a couple of ancient ones in 4-pin envelopes.  Barreters (sometimes with two 't's) are positive tempco filaments which provide a constant current.

http://g3ynh.info/valves/var/barr/index.html

Neil G4DBN

On 17/09/2019 11:51, Andy TALBOT wrote:
I know the spelling is different, but was sitting in a coffee shop this morning being served by a 'Barista' .    Seeing this I suddenly remembered once encountering a device back in the old valve days that someone told me was a Barister   (I vaguely recall it was spelt with one 'r' unlike the legal person).

All I can remember is that it had a filament that glowed dimly.  Suggesting it may be some sort of current limit or stabilisation device?

Can anyone of that era remember what a barister was and even prove my memory isn't wandering.

Google is no help; it keeps wanting to correct the spelling to show legal types or coffee experts.


Andy G4JNT
 

AH.....!
Tnx
Now you give the correct spelling I remember it.



On Tue, 17 Sep 2019 at 11:57, Neil Smith G4DBN <neil@...> wrote:

I still have a couple of ancient ones in 4-pin envelopes.  Barreters (sometimes with two 't's) are positive tempco filaments which provide a constant current.

http://g3ynh.info/valves/var/barr/index.html

Neil G4DBN

On 17/09/2019 11:51, Andy TALBOT wrote:
I know the spelling is different, but was sitting in a coffee shop this morning being served by a 'Barista' .    Seeing this I suddenly remembered once encountering a device back in the old valve days that someone told me was a Barister   (I vaguely recall it was spelt with one 'r' unlike the legal person).

All I can remember is that it had a filament that glowed dimly.  Suggesting it may be some sort of current limit or stabilisation device?

Can anyone of that era remember what a barister was and even prove my memory isn't wandering.

Google is no help; it keeps wanting to correct the spelling to show legal types or coffee experts.

Peter G3PLX <Peter.Martinez@...>
 

Andy:

You said you didn't get anywhere by Googling it, so I didn't try, but I remeber a barister as a filament lamp with a filament having a high positive temperature coefficient, so it worked in the same way as a positive temperature coefficient thermistor does, to control the current through it within fairly narrow limits. I guess you might use one in a series-connected heater chain.

But what is a Barista?

73
Peter G3PLX

Andy
 

I thought they were called Barrettars (James Bond's gun was a Walther PPK). According to www.vintage-radio.com
Website News. A Vintage Radio Service Data DVD-ROM is now available. The price is £29.99 for the full version or £24.99 for just the disk without a case.
www.vintage-radio.com


"Barrettars were used in a fair number of UK AC/DC sets right up into the 1950s and although more costly were better than a conventional mains dropper because of the automatic adjustment to differing mains voltages. A true barrettar has an iron filament in a hydrogen-filled envelope and should not be confused with the American resistance tubes having a conventional nichrome resistance element in what looked like an octal metal tube envelope. "


Andy
MM0FMF


From: RSGB-Workshop@groups.io <RSGB-Workshop@groups.io> on behalf of Andy TALBOT <andy.g4jnt@...>
Sent: Tuesday, September 17, 2019 4:03 AM
To: RSGB-Workshop@groups.io <RSGB-Workshop@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RSGB-Workshop] Baristers
 
AH.....!
Tnx
Now you give the correct spelling I remember it.



On Tue, 17 Sep 2019 at 11:57, Neil Smith G4DBN <neil@...> wrote:

I still have a couple of ancient ones in 4-pin envelopes.  Barreters (sometimes with two 't's) are positive tempco filaments which provide a constant current.

http://g3ynh.info/valves/var/barr/index.html

Neil G4DBN

On 17/09/2019 11:51, Andy TALBOT wrote:
I know the spelling is different, but was sitting in a coffee shop this morning being served by a 'Barista' .    Seeing this I suddenly remembered once encountering a device back in the old valve days that someone told me was a Barister   (I vaguely recall it was spelt with one 'r' unlike the legal person).

All I can remember is that it had a filament that glowed dimly.  Suggesting it may be some sort of current limit or stabilisation device?

Can anyone of that era remember what a barister was and even prove my memory isn't wandering.

Google is no help; it keeps wanting to correct the spelling to show legal types or coffee experts.

Andy G4JNT
 

Ah, you're clearly not a coffee afficionado

Barista is the term for the staff in coffee shops who are supposed to be experts in how to make a good cup of coffee.   Costa seems to be the worst in using the term
Since nowadays their role is to press the right button on the machine and frothed heat milk to the right temperature, the only skill left is making the froth on the coffee have a nice pattern on it .



On Tue, 17 Sep 2019 at 12:08, Peter G3PLX via Groups.Io <Peter.Martinez=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:

But what is a Barista?

73
Peter G3PLX


Peter G3PLX <Peter.Martinez@...>
 

Google "Barretter" and all is revealed. I didn't realise they could be used as detectors too, but these must have had to be very much smaller than the current-limiting type.

73
Peter G3PLX

mike G6TRM
 

I seem to remember they were use by BT for balancing/limiting line current on trunk circuits.....

Mike G6TRM

----- Original Message -----
From: "Peter G3PLX via Groups.Io" <Peter.Martinez=btinternet.com@groups.io>
To: <RSGB-Workshop@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, September 17, 2019 12:33 PM
Subject: Re: [RSGB-Workshop] Baristers


Google "Barretter" and all is revealed. I didn't realise they could be used as detectors too, but these must have had to be very much smaller than the current-limiting type.

73
Peter G3PLX

Brian Morrison <bdm@...>
 

On Tue, 17 Sep 2019 17:58:35 +0700
"Martin Sole" <hs0zed@...> wrote:

I thought that was something James Bond carried?
Beretta. Changed to Walther PPK because Q branch thought the Beretta
too unreliable.

--

Brian Morrison

"I am not young enough to know everything"
Oscar Wilde

Brian Morrison <bdm@...>
 

On Tue, 17 Sep 2019 12:12:44 +0100
"Andy TALBOT" <andy.g4jnt@...> wrote:

Barista is the term for the staff in coffee shops who are supposed to be
experts in how to make a good cup of coffee. Costa seems to be the worst
in using the term
Since nowadays their role is to press the right button on the machine and
frothed heat milk to the right temperature, the only skill left is making
the froth on the coffee have a nice pattern on it .
I can hear my daughter getting ready for a fight right now Andy.
There's a lot more to it than that!

--

Brian Morrison G8SEZ

Eddie G0EHV
 

Also in the common or garden final selector 😉
I seem to remember quite reliable.
Eddie
G0EHV

Launched into the ether from my iPad

On 17 Sep 2019, at 13:08, mike G6TRM via Groups.Io <mike.bryant=virgin.net@groups.io> wrote:

I seem to remember they were use by BT for balancing/limiting line current on trunk circuits.....

Mike G6TRM


----- Original Message ----- From: "Peter G3PLX via Groups.Io" <Peter.Martinez=btinternet.com@groups.io>
To: <RSGB-Workshop@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, September 17, 2019 12:33 PM
Subject: Re: [RSGB-Workshop] Baristers


Google "Barretter" and all is revealed. I didn't realise they could be used as detectors too, but these must have had to be very much smaller than the current-limiting type.

73
Peter G3PLX


John Button G8JMB
 

"All I can remember is that it..glowed dimly

About right for a barrister.

"the only skill left is making the froth on the coffee have a nice pattern on it ...There's a lot more to it than that!

Is that so? Justifying the price and  marketeer-speak silly names for black and white coffee, perhaps.

73
John G8JMB, hankering for Kardomah and Lyons...

Michael Scott
 

Hi All
 
They were used in the days  of live chassis AC/DC receivers where the valve heaters were in series, often with odd voltages but with constant current  specification. The voltages with the Barreter ( ? ) in series with the heater chain and a dropping resistor so that the whole chain added up to the 230v mains voltage. It was an economical way of dispensing with a costly mains transformer. The fact that it could be used on a DC supply was a bonus as there were still a few places in the 40s and 50s on DC mains . The boarding school I attended was an example wit the DC being generated by a turbine on the adjacent river with a marine diesel engine as a backup!!
 
73, Mike, G3LYP.  

Wilko Bulte
 

No, 007 carried a Beretta. Something else entirely.
Or a Walter PPK.

73 Wilko

Andy G4JNT
 

Keep to the point OM :-)



On Tue, 17 Sep 2019 at 16:40, Wilko Bulte <wkb@...> wrote:
No, 007 carried a Beretta. Something else entirely.
Or a Walter PPK.

73 Wilko



Alan
 

There was also the resistance wire in the mains lead method-  quite widely used but seldom remembered.

 

Alan

G8LCO

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

 

John Rabson
 

Known in the US as “line cord” I believe.

John F5VLF

On 17 Sep 2019, at 17:41, Alan <g8lco1@...> wrote:

There was also the resistance wire in the mains lead method-  quite widely used but seldom remembered.

 

Alan

G8LCO

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


 

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Ian Jackson
 

'Line cord' is simply the normal US name for 'mains lead'.

My grandmother had a small radio with a line core mains dropper. It got warm (of course). I believe the standing instruction for such horrible things was never to hide the mains lead under a carpet, or coil it up - and never, never, ever to shorten it.

Ian (G3OHX)


In message <95659784-40C0-4C8B-9C7B-8FD5A6C69B10@...>, John Rabson <john.rabson07@...> writes
Known in the US as “line cord” I believe.
John F5VLF

On 17 Sep 2019, at 17:41, Alan <g8lco1@...> wrote:

v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o\:*
{behavior:url(#default#VML);} w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
.shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);}

There was also the resistance wire in the mains lead method-  
quite widely used but seldom remembered.
 
Alan
G8LCO
--

Peter Chadwick
 

------ Original Message ------
From: "Brian Morrison" <bdm@...>
To: RSGB-Workshop@groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, 17 Sep, 19 At 13:25
Subject: Re: [RSGB-Workshop] Baristers

On Tue, 17 Sep 2019 17:58:35 +0700
"Martin Sole" <hs0zed@...> wrote:

I thought that was something James Bond carried?
Beretta. Changed to Walther PPK because Q branch thought the Beretta
too unreliable.

--

Brian Morrison

"I am not young enough to know everything"
Oscar Wilde