Date   

Two Walt Disney featurettes on train enthusiasts of various scales

Dennis Hogan
 


Re: Nacodoches loco

D. Howard Bingham
 

And what was the "Lame-Brained" reason for cutting a part that's no longer made.?

Can't be due to the length, any Low Boy 4 Axle Float trailer should have been able to haul this with minimal effort,

I know several trucking & moving companies that have handled MUCH LARGER and heavier loads in both USA and Canada.

D. Howard Bingham

Posted: Oct. 13, 2021, 07:13 pm CDT

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On 10/12/2021 12:28 PM, Mike Murray wrote:
This shows them using a cutting torch on the drive shaft.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lViQ6N3u978

On Tue, Oct 12, 2021 at 10:10 AM Tom Roise via groups.io <tomroise=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Amazing !!!!

Tom Roise


> On Oct 12, 2021, at 9:58 AM, texaszephyr <texaszephyr@...> wrote:
>
> There is a new video posted on YouTube by Neil Dahl that shows workers slicing through its drive shafts with cutting blades as they prepare to move the shay from Stephen F. Austin University to Michigan.
>
> Talking about adding insult to injury!!!
>
> TZ
>
>
>
>
>






Re: A MC&SA tribute

Dennis Hogan
 

Short home movie here on a MC&SA mixed train trip in 1959:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJpHCKrpiFQ

I think the photographer (yet to be identified) appears early in the film with
his children.


Barely out of RS territory: D&S in autumn snow

Dennis Hogan
 

Seasons can change quickly in Colorado and Northern New Mexico.
Here's a 10-second clip from yesterday:
D&S in October snow


Re: Cimarron NM

Dennis Hogan
 

A close-up of the depot:
Cimarron NM depot


Cimarron NM

Dennis Hogan
 

The StLRM&P ("Swastika Route") operated from here.
[photo is from the NM Palace of Governors archives]


Re: Dallas Union Terminal in 1957

Dennis Hogan
 

Here's some film shot on the Reader RR:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21avnGmjYm4


Transit-Rail FUNDING seen as Vulnerable to Congress Reconciliation-Cuts.

David H Bingham
 

https://www.rollcall.com/2021/10/12/transit-rail-funding-seen-as-vulnerable-to-reconciliation-cuts/ 

Forwarded from: The Hill, by: D. Howard Bingham
Posted: October 12, 2021, 04:58 pm CDT
                           🚅🚍🚈🚄



Re: Nacodoches loco

Stephen McNeill
 

It looks to me like it is a cutting wheel on a grinder type machine, not an acetylene torch that is doing the cutting.  it would make for a cleaner cut.

Stephen L. McNeill



On Tuesday, October 12, 2021, 12:28:56 PM CDT, Mike Murray <mikemurray6044@...> wrote:


This shows them using a cutting torch on the drive shaft.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lViQ6N3u978

On Tue, Oct 12, 2021 at 10:10 AM Tom Roise via groups.io <tomroise=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Amazing !!!!

Tom Roise


> On Oct 12, 2021, at 9:58 AM, texaszephyr <texaszephyr@...> wrote:
>
> There is a new video posted on YouTube by Neil Dahl that shows workers slicing through its drive shafts with cutting blades as they prepare to move the shay from Stephen F. Austin University to Michigan.
>
> Talking about adding insult to injury!!!
>
> TZ
>
>
>
>
>







Re: Nacodoches loco

Bill Nash
 

Looks like a cutting disk to me. Also, no hoses for a torch.  


On Oct 12, 2021, at 2:37 PM, Everett Lueck <elueck@...> wrote:

This shows them using a cutting torch on the drive shaft.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lViQ6N3u978


Re: Nacodoches loco

Everett Lueck
 

Not a cutting torch.  A metal cutting disc, to get a smooth cut.  As I explained earlier,  the u joints were frozen and the rear truck had to be removed to transport the loco.  

On Tuesday, October 12, 2021, 12:28:57 PM CDT, Mike Murray <mikemurray6044@...> wrote:


This shows them using a cutting torch on the drive shaft.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lViQ6N3u978

On Tue, Oct 12, 2021 at 10:10 AM Tom Roise via groups.io <tomroise=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Amazing !!!!

Tom Roise


> On Oct 12, 2021, at 9:58 AM, texaszephyr <texaszephyr@...> wrote:
>
> There is a new video posted on YouTube by Neil Dahl that shows workers slicing through its drive shafts with cutting blades as they prepare to move the shay from Stephen F. Austin University to Michigan.
>
> Talking about adding insult to injury!!!
>
> TZ
>
>
>
>
>







Re: Nacodoches loco

Mike Murray
 

This shows them using a cutting torch on the drive shaft.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lViQ6N3u978


On Tue, Oct 12, 2021 at 10:10 AM Tom Roise via groups.io <tomroise=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Amazing !!!!

Tom Roise


> On Oct 12, 2021, at 9:58 AM, texaszephyr <texaszephyr@...> wrote:
>
> There is a new video posted on YouTube by Neil Dahl that shows workers slicing through its drive shafts with cutting blades as they prepare to move the shay from Stephen F. Austin University to Michigan.
>
> Talking about adding insult to injury!!!
>
> TZ
>
>
>
>
>







Re: Nacodoches loco

Everett Lueck
 


Moving day photos of the shay

On Tuesday, October 12, 2021, 10:11:03 AM CDT, Tom Roise via groups.io <tomroise@...> wrote:


Amazing !!!!

Tom Roise


> On Oct 12, 2021, at 9:58 AM, texaszephyr <texaszephyr@...> wrote:
>
> There is a new video posted on YouTube by Neil Dahl that shows workers slicing through its drive shafts with cutting blades as they prepare to move the shay from Stephen F. Austin University to Michigan.
>
> Talking about adding insult to injury!!!
>
> TZ
>
>
>
>
>







Re: Nacodoches loco

Everett Lueck
 

Reference to the photos taken on moving day shows that the rear portion of the drive shaft was slipped out of the slip joint, so only a single cut was made.

On Tuesday, October 12, 2021, 10:11:03 AM CDT, Tom Roise via groups.io <tomroise@...> wrote:


Amazing !!!!

Tom Roise


> On Oct 12, 2021, at 9:58 AM, texaszephyr <texaszephyr@...> wrote:
>
> There is a new video posted on YouTube by Neil Dahl that shows workers slicing through its drive shafts with cutting blades as they prepare to move the shay from Stephen F. Austin University to Michigan.
>
> Talking about adding insult to injury!!!
>
> TZ
>
>
>
>
>







Re: Off topic: Lost Cotton Gins of Central Texas

Tom Roise
 

Great for Texas !!

Tom Roise


On Oct 12, 2021, at 8:09 AM, Stephen McNeill via groups.io <slmmcneill@...> wrote:


Heard on the local (Corpus Christi) news that cotton prices are at a ten year high.  There is a big demand in ?China, who would have guessed, for cotton for clothing.

Stephen L. McNeill



----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Walt Parsons via groups.io <waltp7@...>
To: "tomroise@..." <tomroise@...>
Cc: Barton Jennings <be.jennings3009@...>; Jim King <jgking@...>; Dennis Hogan <denmeg_hogan@...>; "rs-talon@groups.io" <rs-talon@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, October 11, 2021, 10:22:29 PM CDT
Subject: Re: [Railspot] Off topic: Lost Cotton Gins of Central Texas

I believe I saw a post here awhile back about BNSF running containers through Quanah into Oklahoma that were being loaded with cotton for the west coast? Did I imagine it?


On Oct 11, 2021, at 9:47 PM, Tom Roise via groups.io <tomroise@...> wrote:


So where is all of this cotton going?

Can’t find any clothes made in America anymore ???????

Tom Roise


On Oct 11, 2021, at 9:24 PM, Barton Jennings <be.jennings3009@...> wrote:


And for those interested in how common cotton gins used to be, here is some data.

By 1920, there were 18,440 cotton gins in the United States, producing 13,271,000 bales, or 720 bales per gin. In 1940, there were 11,650 cotton gins that produced 12,298,000 bales, or 1056 on average. Since then, the number of cotton gins has continued to decrease even while the production of cotton has increased. This came about due to larger and more efficient gins, with 5395 gins producing 14,265,000 bales in 1960 (2644 per gin) and 1533 gins producing 15,065,000 bales (an average of 9826) in 1990.

Bart

On Mon, Oct 11, 2021 at 7:23 PM Jim King <jgking@...> wrote:

I’ll convert this to a railroad related post by mentioning that my brother-in-law owns the abandoned cotton gin in Coupland which was used as the location for the feed store scene in the 2003 movie “Second Hand Lions”. The scene includes a UP train passing in the background. The video below, describing locations from the movie, begins by showing the feed store / cotton gin, including a brief view of the train shot.

--jk

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hPBnv93cK1g&list=PLINHqyiBCvaEfux_nlfDMdrbbAX8-WETb&index=15

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Dennis Hogan
Sent: Sunday, October 10, 2021 11:58 AM
To: RS-TALON@groups.io
Subject: [Railspot] Off topic: Lost Cotton Gins of Central Texas

 

For that Railspotter with an interest in a book covering a bit of regional
industrial archaeology:
Lost Cotton Gins of Central Texas

 


Re: Nacodoches loco

Everett Lueck
 

The rear truck had to be removed to fit on the trailer that hauled the locomotive.  I was not there, but it appears that the U joints and the slip joint were both frozen.which prevented the removal of the rear truck.  That is hardly surpising considering the lengh of time that the engine has sat there without being moved or lubricated.   Cutting the drive shaft to remove it is preferable to cutting the U joint or the slip joint and where it is being cut leaves plenty of room to re weld it (which was often done with shays) and even sleeve it (also done) if necessary.  

On Tuesday, October 12, 2021, 09:58:33 AM CDT, texaszephyr <texaszephyr@...> wrote:


There is a new video posted on YouTube by Neil Dahl that shows workers slicing through its drive shafts with cutting blades as they prepare to move the shay from Stephen F. Austin University to Michigan.

Talking about adding insult to injury!!!

TZ






Re: Nacodoches loco

Tom Roise
 

Amazing !!!!

Tom Roise

On Oct 12, 2021, at 9:58 AM, texaszephyr <texaszephyr@sw.rr.com> wrote:

There is a new video posted on YouTube by Neil Dahl that shows workers slicing through its drive shafts with cutting blades as they prepare to move the shay from Stephen F. Austin University to Michigan.

Talking about adding insult to injury!!!

TZ





Nacodoches loco

texaszephyr
 

There is a new video posted on YouTube by Neil Dahl that shows workers slicing through its drive shafts with cutting blades as they prepare to move the shay from Stephen F. Austin University to Michigan.

Talking about adding insult to injury!!!

TZ


Fw: [Railspot] Off topic: Lost Cotton Gins of Central Texas

Stephen McNeill
 

Heard on the local (Corpus Christi) news that cotton prices are at a ten year high.  There is a big demand in ?China, who would have guessed, for cotton for clothing.

Stephen L. McNeill



----- Forwarded Message -----

From: Walt Parsons via groups.io <waltp7@...>
To: "tomroise@..." <tomroise@...>
Cc: Barton Jennings <be.jennings3009@...>; Jim King <jgking@...>; Dennis Hogan <denmeg_hogan@...>; "rs-talon@groups.io" <rs-talon@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, October 11, 2021, 10:22:29 PM CDT
Subject: Re: [Railspot] Off topic: Lost Cotton Gins of Central Texas

I believe I saw a post here awhile back about BNSF running containers through Quanah into Oklahoma that were being loaded with cotton for the west coast? Did I imagine it?


On Oct 11, 2021, at 9:47 PM, Tom Roise via groups.io <tomroise@...> wrote:


So where is all of this cotton going?

Can’t find any clothes made in America anymore ???????

Tom Roise


On Oct 11, 2021, at 9:24 PM, Barton Jennings <be.jennings3009@...> wrote:


And for those interested in how common cotton gins used to be, here is some data.

By 1920, there were 18,440 cotton gins in the United States, producing 13,271,000 bales, or 720 bales per gin. In 1940, there were 11,650 cotton gins that produced 12,298,000 bales, or 1056 on average. Since then, the number of cotton gins has continued to decrease even while the production of cotton has increased. This came about due to larger and more efficient gins, with 5395 gins producing 14,265,000 bales in 1960 (2644 per gin) and 1533 gins producing 15,065,000 bales (an average of 9826) in 1990.

Bart

On Mon, Oct 11, 2021 at 7:23 PM Jim King <jgking@...> wrote:

I’ll convert this to a railroad related post by mentioning that my brother-in-law owns the abandoned cotton gin in Coupland which was used as the location for the feed store scene in the 2003 movie “Second Hand Lions”. The scene includes a UP train passing in the background. The video below, describing locations from the movie, begins by showing the feed store / cotton gin, including a brief view of the train shot.

--jk

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hPBnv93cK1g&list=PLINHqyiBCvaEfux_nlfDMdrbbAX8-WETb&index=15

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Dennis Hogan
Sent: Sunday, October 10, 2021 11:58 AM
To: RS-TALON@groups.io
Subject: [Railspot] Off topic: Lost Cotton Gins of Central Texas

 

For that Railspotter with an interest in a book covering a bit of regional
industrial archaeology:
Lost Cotton Gins of Central Texas

 


Re: Off topic: Lost Cotton Gins of Central Texas

randy james
 



Great movie, a favorite of mine. Always got kick out of the fight scene

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

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