New article on identifying cases at risk in short term disability cases


Jennifer Christian MD
 

Found a potentially useful article  that you may find helpful in designing your RETAIN project / writing your proposal.  It concerns identifying cases at risk for eventual entry onto SSDI in short-term disability claims lists.  The abstract and list of references are pasted below.  

 

Cordially,

Jennifer Christian, MD, MPH

President / Chief Medical Officer

Webility Corporation

Office:  508-358-5218 (preferred)

Mobile:  617-803-9835

Email: jennifer.christian@...

 

Frank Neuhauser, Yonatan Ben-Shalom, David Stapleton. Early Identification of Potential SSDI Entrants in California: The Predictive Value of State Disability Insurance and Workers’ Compensation Claims. Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, pp 1–10|

First Online: 15 June 2018

 

Abstract

 

Purpose              Examine the potential for using information in short-term disability claims to identify workers at high risk of leaving the workforce and entering Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

Methods             We analyze state-wide California data on claimants of State Disability Insurance (SDI) and Workers’ Compensation (WC) and present statistics on: (1) characteristics (primary diagnosis, sex, age, geography, wage level) by claim duration (0–3, 4–6, 7–12, 12 + months); and (2) the ability of initial claim characteristics to predict duration of at least 12 months. All data are for claims with disability lasting more than 1 week.

Results                22.2% of SDI claims last longer than 6 months and 12.5% last 12 months. More WC claims reach these durations: 33.7 and 18.6%, respectively. Long-term SDI and WC claimants are similar to SSDI awardees, nationwide, but differ in age distribution; they are typically younger.

Conclusions       Characteristics of SDI and WC claims can help predict claims likely to last 12 months, but more information is needed to effectively target early intervention services. Waiting longer to intervene improves targeting but risks missing opportunities where early intervention could be more effective. Collecting additional information at SDI or WC entry or soon thereafter could improve both the efficiency and timing of interventions.

 

Acknowledgements

The authors thank the California Division of Workers’ Compensation and Employment Development Department for providing the data, the representatives of multiple relevant California organizations for providing further context through in-person interviews, and David Wittenburg for providing helpful comments on an early draft. The research reported herein was performed pursuant to a grant from the Social Security Administration that was funded as part of the Disability Research Consortium (Grant DRC12000001-04-00). The opinions and conclusions expressed are solely those of the authors and do not represent the opinions or policy of SSA nor of any other agency of the federal government. Neither the U.S. government nor any of its agencies or employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of the contents of this paper.

 

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