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Re: [spelling] Contraction for "whatever" in Senior Quikscript

Moira O'Brien
 

My personal crib sheet for QS contractions shows it without the '-' - just "w i ou t" and I don't think Kingsley Read every used it with a hyphen on our correspondence.


[spelling] Contraction for "whatever" in Senior Quikscript

Nathan Galt
 

Looking at page 17 of the manual, I'm not sure what to make of the dash (?) between the ·why and the ·et. _Is_ it a dash? Was "what-ever" the preferred spelling in Read's day (like how "type-writer" became "typewriter" over the years)?


Re: Contraction for "without" in Senior Quickscript

Nathan Galt
 

On Thu, Mar 4, 2021, at 3:21 PM, steveb_667 wrote:
My understanding of the contraction for "without" is 18+26+37+3. The T (#3) is a half-T (described on page 14) that attaches to the end of "ou" symbol (37), pointing upward.

I see no additional letters to the right of the "without." There is a dot that separates the contractions "with" & "without." This type of separation is used multiple times throughout the manual (see pages 14 & 15 for examples).

That is my interpretation of the contraction "without."

That's how I read page 17, too.


Re: Contraction for "without" in Senior Quickscript

steveb_667
 

My understanding of the contraction for "without" is 18+26+37+3. The T (#3) is a half-T (described on page 14) that attaches to the end of "ou" symbol (37), pointing upward.

I see no additional letters to the right of the "without." There is a dot that separates the contractions "with" & "without." This type of separation is used multiple times throughout the manual (see pages 14 & 15 for examples).

That is my interpretation of the contraction "without."


Contraction for "without" in Senior Quickscript

E
 

On page 17 in the Quickscript manual Kingsley Read offers some standard contractions for use in Senior Quickscript. Looking at with & without, it is clear that "with" is 18+26. However, "without" is 18+26, followed by 1-2 more letters that are unclear. The one following 26 seems to be 3, but then it looks like there is either another letter next to that, which makes no sense, or perhaps it's a blob of ink.

I've looked up the translations of the texts he provides as examples of written Senior QS on pgs 24-25 (the Rip van Winkle excerpt, as well as the Froude and Stevenson excerpts) but the word "without" doesn't appear in any of these, so I'm stuck.

On pg 12 he states that 3 is used as a contraction for "to," so it doesn't quite make sense to me that he'd use 18+26+3 as an abbreviation for "without." I would think it would be 18+26+37+3, or maybe 18+26+37. However, my best guess after staring at it intently is that it really is 18+26+3+inkblob (meaning that his intention was that the contraction for "without" be 18+26+3).

Does anyone have an authoritative source that speaks to this point? I know I can make up my own contraction for "without," a word that definitely needs one since it's so frequently written, but I'm wondering what Read intended.


Re: Kingsley Read Lexicon

Shavian.info
 

You’re very welcome. Anything to support the work of the modest and underrated Kingsley Read.

Evan

On 7 Dec 2020, at 7:42 am, Paige <paige@...> wrote:

Evan,

Let me add my heartfelt thanks for this offer as well.  It is very kind and generous.

Cheers,

Paige Gabhart

On 12/6/2020 2:47 PM, Trelligan via groups.io wrote:

Thank you very much! This is quite a generous offer - and a valuable resource for those interested in other phonetic spellings, as well.



Re: Kingsley Read Lexicon

Paige
 

Evan,

Let me add my heartfelt thanks for this offer as well.  It is very kind and generous.

Cheers,

Paige Gabhart

On 12/6/2020 2:47 PM, Trelligan via groups.io wrote:

Thank you very much! This is quite a generous offer - and a valuable resource for those interested in other phonetic spellings, as well.


Re: Kingsley Read Lexicon

Trelligan
 

Thank you very much! This is quite a generous offer - and a valuable resource for those interested in other phonetic spellings, as well.


Kingsley Read Lexicon

Shavian.info
 

Hi Quikscripters

I run Shavian.info and have just published a 100,000+ term lexicon of Shavian spellings, which could easily be adapted for Quikscript as well. A high-level explanation of the principles adopted in determining the spellings, and a link to the dictionary (in TSV format) is available at https://shavian.info/dictionary/

To assist with Quikscript conversion, I’ve marked words that optionally take /ʍ/ in the IPA pronunciation column. I haven’t distinguished Welsh “ll” or Scots “ch” unfortunately, but they optionally occur in a fairly select few words in English and could probably be fixed manually without too much fuss.

There are just a few words for which I have not yet added IPA pronunciation guides. But still, this might be a useful resource for developing a Quikscript transliteration dictionary too.

Feel free to adapt it for Quikscript if you think it might be helpful.

Evan


Re: Groups.io

Darcie
 

After Paige's email I wondered what we still had on our group site. Was of course worried for a bit until I realised that I needed to sign in. Sigh. It looks like it is all there.

On another note I've wondered for a while. Does anyone ever think that we should add something to the Wiki feature, and if so what? (Not sure how we'd add pages, possibly an admin would have to do that)

And thanks Paige for all the work of transfering and downgrading. 

Cheers,
Darcie


-------- Original message --------
From: Paige <paige@...>
Date: 2020/10/10 1:56 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: QuikScript@groups.io
Subject: [Special] [QuikScript] Groups.io

Our first year on groups.io will end on 10/24.  As planned I have downgraded the group to free to avoid the $220/yr.  fee.  Here are the changes this will entail:
  • The storage allocation goes from 20 GB to 1 GB.
  • Any subgroups are locked.
    Exception: If your group was created before January 15, 2020, subgroups will remain accessible because Basic groups created before that date were able to have subgroups. (This applies to Basic groups created before January 15, 2020 that were upgraded either before or after that date as well as to Premium groups created before that date.)
  • All features become unavailable except those related to sending and managing messages. However, nothing is deleted in case you decide to upgrade again in the future.
    Exception: If your group was created before August 24, 2020, the downgraded Basic group will retain the calendar, chat, database, member directory, files, photos, poll, and wiki features.  (Empasis added)
Apparently, groups.io wants to dissuade those who are in the free group to move to the premium version.

To those who helped fund the first year to keep the group alive, after we left Yahoo, I extend my grateful thanks.

Paige Gabhart


Re: Groups.io

Paige
 

Correction:  Apparently, groups.io wants to persuade those who are in the free group to move to the premium version.


Groups.io

Paige
 

Our first year on groups.io will end on 10/24.  As planned I have downgraded the group to free to avoid the $220/yr.  fee.  Here are the changes this will entail:
  • The storage allocation goes from 20 GB to 1 GB.
  • Any subgroups are locked.
    Exception: If your group was created before January 15, 2020, subgroups will remain accessible because Basic groups created before that date were able to have subgroups. (This applies to Basic groups created before January 15, 2020 that were upgraded either before or after that date as well as to Premium groups created before that date.)
  • All features become unavailable except those related to sending and managing messages. However, nothing is deleted in case you decide to upgrade again in the future.
    Exception: If your group was created before August 24, 2020, the downgraded Basic group will retain the calendar, chat, database, member directory, files, photos, poll, and wiki features.  (Empasis added)
Apparently, groups.io wants to dissuade those who are in the free group to move to the premium version.

To those who helped fund the first year to keep the group alive, after we left Yahoo, I extend my grateful thanks.

Paige Gabhart


Re: New Quikscript website

Brad Neil
 

Thanks for the kind words! I'm really glad to hear my little project has helped you.

Also thanks for letting me know about the broken webfonts -- it was definitely my fault! It must have been like that for weeks since it was caused by a change I made back in July... oh well, all fixed now!


Re: New Quikscript website

thankgoditssunny@...
 

Hi Brad,

I am new to this community and moderately new to Quikscript. I've been searching for some material to help improve my reading ability, and your website has some great resources. I wanted to say thank you, and that I appreciate your time and effort spent to compile and share them!
Also, as a heads up, it appears Thoth and Quikscript Sans are not displaying correctly for me on the "Other Fonts" page, though I don't know if that's my computer or a website issue. The rest of them, including yours, display as intended.


An interesting blog post about OpenType contextual substitution #fontmaking

Nathan Galt
 

https://litherum.blogspot.com/2019/03/addition-font.html

You’ll want to read this if you want to understand OpenType well enough to make a proper Senior Quikscript font. Most OpenType substitution doesn’t get any fancier than “replace f f i with ffi_ligature”.

There’s also the following, which I probably linked to here before:

https://ansuz.sooke.bc.ca/entry/131


Re: Newbie - using FoxReplace to learn to read Quikscript

Nathan Galt
 

I did something like this in adaptor raptor. One base dictionary (50.yaml), combined with a document-specific dictionary (04.yaml) is how I’m* adapting “Omnilingual”. The document-specific dictionary gets ambiguous and document-specific words/phrases like:

- “wind” (in this story, there’s a breeze, but no cranking anywhere)
- “Wilhelm II” (unlikely to be useful elsewhere)
- “what I object” (because the spelling of “object” is generally ambiguous)
- “object after object” (uses the other spelling of “object”, because we’re talking about Arean junk lying around)
- “Tony” (elsewhere in English, “tony” is an adjective, too, in which case it doesn’t get the namer dot)

Of course, reading something like “wind” and remembering that the other pronunciation exists can be a bit of a challenge. I’ve probably misclassified at least one by now, and I’m not even done with the short story.

On Jul 8, 2020, at 7:16 AM,  <chickensaregreat@...> wrote:

Instead of an algorithm or singular words, how about we do it by phrases?

Examples: I read that book yesterday would definitely be 'RED' so we can replace that whole phrase with the Quikscript equivalent. Granted, this workaround is not ideal because we will be clogging up the dictionary with arguably unnecessary bloat but it's a workaround nonetheless.


Re: Newbie - using FoxReplace to learn to read Quikscript

John Cowan
 

Alas, that's hopeless: you underestimate the productivity of language.  Consider all the words for things that can be read besides "book":  magazine, newspaper, article, post, comment, tweet, page, paragraph, (stone or clay) tablet.  Then consider all the possible adjectives that could apply to any of them.  Mere phrase substitution will not work.

Consider "The more the merrier."  That doesn't look like a grammatical sentence, and most people simply understand it as a fixed phrase.  But it is indeed a type of sentence and just as productive as any other sentence type:  "The deeper I breathe, the more often I cough" or "The more bored you are in class, the more difficult it'll be to enjoy the subject and learn" or even "The less coffee I drink, the sleeper I seem to feel."



On Wed, Jul 8, 2020 at 10:16 AM  <chickensaregreat@...> wrote:
Instead of an algorithm or singular words, how about we do it by phrases?

Examples: I read that book yesterday would definitely be 'RED' so we can replace that whole phrase with the Quikscript equivalent. Granted, this workaround is not ideal because we will be clogging up the dictionary with arguably unnecessary bloat but it's a workaround nonetheless.


Re: Newbie - using FoxReplace to learn to read Quikscript


 

Instead of an algorithm or singular words, how about we do it by phrases?

Examples: I read that book yesterday would definitely be 'RED' so we can replace that whole phrase with the Quikscript equivalent. Granted, this workaround is not ideal because we will be clogging up the dictionary with arguably unnecessary bloat but it's a workaround nonetheless.


Re: New Quikscript website

Brad Neil
 

Thanks again for the feedback! I've heard of Atom and RSS but don't really know about them. I'll definitely look into it now!

have you thought about contacting https://www.shavian.info/resources/ to add your site there?
No, for a couple of reasons: first, I must confess I wasn't even aware of that site (Quikscript being my primary interest, rather than Shavian) and I also feel it would be a rather forward thing to do! Besides, mine is certainly not the only site about QS - I am very appreciative of the others (especially the Quikscript Outpost, which has helped me with some of my own misgivings) too. For now I think it's OK.


Re: Newbie - using FoxReplace to learn to read Quikscript

Brad Neil
 

Regarding Latin-spellings with multiple pronunciations (read, use, conflict, etc. etc.) I always thought the word for it was 'homograph'. I just looked it up on Wikipedia and it turns out that 'heteronym' is actually more technically correct for what we're talking about. So thanks for bringing that up!

Anyway, a few years ago I found this list of 647 of them: https://web.archive.org/web/20180816004508/http://www.minpairs.talktalk.net/graph.html?showpage=true

It was one of the first things I incorporated into my personal transliteration dictionary. My Lua program was designed to stop and prompt the user to choose one of the two possible QS spellings for each one found in the text during conversion (you would have to have the original text open, ready to search for the words to identify each one manually). I figured that would be much easier and more reliable than trying to find some kind of algorithm to do it! And as John C. said, they don't come up terribly often so it doesn't really create unnecessary tedium :-)

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