Topics

Winding QCX T1 #t1 #qcx

Alan
 

The easy way of tinning self fluxing enamel is to apply iron tip and fresh  cored solder to the cut end of the wire. The solder reacts with the exposed copper, the  coating then melts back and the exposed copper tins quickly. Practice is good BEFORE you do the important stuff.

 

Scraping works well, you just need to remove a line of enamel -not remove all of the enamel- before iron & fresh solder.  A hot iron helps a lot for tinning .

 

Note that there are some coatings that are NOT solder through, such as deflection (scan) coils or high voltage/temp  enamels.

 

73

Alan

G8LCO

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

 

Glen Leinweber
 

Am not fond of heat-stripping enamel wire. Yes, a hot soldering iron can eventually strip off the enamel. Applying solder liberally helps this process. But a mess of burnt residue usually is left, which is best scrapped off after cooling. Then the wire end is best re-tinned a-fresh to shed excess solder coating. It is all too easy to apply insufficient heat to actually strip the enamel, but coat the wire with solder. Looks metallic, but not electrically connected to copper.

With heat-stripping enamel, I scrape through first. Maybe not all the way around, but enough to allow soldering iron to meet fresh copper. It strips much faster, as Alan G8LCO suggests. Burnt residue still requires scraping off. With older high-temperature enamel, a thorough,complete scraping first is absolutely required, and it is visibly apparent when you've missed a bit after tinning. No burnt residue is left. This kind of enamel requires more prep work, which means that nicking copper is a bigger risk. Both types of enamel requires scraping IMO. And tinning with fluxed solder is absolutely required IMO - the risk of remnant nearly-invisible enamel is too great: tinning exposes it. I'd rather put in a full scraping effort, and be assured that enamel is gone for sure, with a clear transition from tinned copper to insulating enamel - that favours the high-heat non-striping enamel.

One other thing - reusing old enamel wire is risky. Some windings are fixed in place with a bonding agent - when you remove enamel wire from such a form (like TV deflection scan coils) the enamel can de-bond from the copper. Really old enamel often becomes brittle - you can hear and see it crack and de-bond from the copper when flexed. Not appropriate for a tight toroid winding on small cores. In any case, if you re-wind a toroid, I'd recommend using fresh wire - the original winding has had its enamel stressed too far  - original winding always goes to recycling.
-Glen VE3DNL

Art Hejduk
 

I burn the enamel using a butane lighter, remove the residue with fine grit sand paper, and then tin the wire.  It works quite well.

73,
Art  WB8ENE

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 11:52 AM Glen Leinweber <leinwebe@...> wrote:

Am not fond of heat-stripping enamel wire. Yes, a hot soldering iron can eventually strip off the enamel. Applying solder liberally helps this process. But a mess of burnt residue usually is left, which is best scrapped off after cooling. Then the wire end is best re-tinned a-fresh to shed excess solder coating. It is all too easy to apply insufficient heat to actually strip the enamel, but coat the wire with solder. Looks metallic, but not electrically connected to copper.

With heat-stripping enamel, I scrape through first. Maybe not all the way around, but enough to allow soldering iron to meet fresh copper. It strips much faster, as Alan G8LCO suggests. Burnt residue still requires scraping off. With older high-temperature enamel, a thorough,complete scraping first is absolutely required, and it is visibly apparent when you've missed a bit after tinning. No burnt residue is left. This kind of enamel requires more prep work, which means that nicking copper is a bigger risk. Both types of enamel requires scraping IMO. And tinning with fluxed solder is absolutely required IMO - the risk of remnant nearly-invisible enamel is too great: tinning exposes it. I'd rather put in a full scraping effort, and be assured that enamel is gone for sure, with a clear transition from tinned copper to insulating enamel - that favours the high-heat non-striping enamel.

One other thing - reusing old enamel wire is risky. Some windings are fixed in place with a bonding agent - when you remove enamel wire from such a form (like TV deflection scan coils) the enamel can de-bond from the copper. Really old enamel often becomes brittle - you can hear and see it crack and de-bond from the copper when flexed. Not appropriate for a tight toroid winding on small cores. In any case, if you re-wind a toroid, I'd recommend using fresh wire - the original winding has had its enamel stressed too far  - original winding always goes to recycling.
-Glen VE3DNL

Michael O'Bannon
 

I always scrape enameled wire, and have never had a problem with breakage.  Use the *back* side of the Exacto blade or a razor knife to reduce chances of nicks.  That side is duller, but scrapes just fine.  A little less pressure also helps.

72,

Michael KD4SGN

On 8/23/2018 11:52 AM, Glen Leinweber wrote:


With heat-stripping enamel, I scrape through first. Maybe not all the way around, but enough to allow soldering iron to meet fresh copper. It strips much faster, as Alan G8LCO suggests. Burnt residue still requires scraping off. With older high-temperature enamel, a thorough,complete scraping first is absolutely required, and it is visibly apparent when you've missed a bit after tinning. No burnt residue is left. This kind of enamel requires more prep work, which means that nicking copper is a bigger risk. Both types of enamel requires scraping IMO. And tinning with fluxed solder is absolutely required IMO - the risk of remnant nearly-invisible enamel is too great: tinning exposes it. I'd rather put in a full scraping effort, and be assured that enamel is gone for sure, with a clear transition from tinned copper to insulating enamel - that favours the high-heat non-striping enamel.

Alan
 

Writing anything to this group  demands a little thought, most people seem to be starting in the hobby so don’t have the experience or piles of materials that others have.

 

A little enamel residue is not very significant but burning off the insulation is not a great idea from a respiration viewpoint, you also coat the copper with oxide which hinders soldering. An easy way of abrading off a little of the enamel is to use a tiny piece of fine sandpaper /wet & dry/ diamond file  to scratch the coating, solder and heat will do the rest. It is the work of a moment to tin a suitable enamelled wire-  not a big effort. But I do avoid breathing in the fume from the enamel- best avoided.

 

There are VERY MANY specialised coatings for motor windings and scan coils. Some are double layer, you wind the coil then heat with a high current to fuse the outer layers together, some coils are wound  using a  hot lacquer  spray during winding which is very solid indeed. Windings in induction motors can be malleted in place then varnished. But the majority of low cost wires are low temp self fluxing/ Solder through types- at least the ones made in the last 50 years. I would avoid the older dark varnishes- you might wind something complicated then discover that the brittle old enamel has caused an internal short.

 

Simple coils that are loose wound can be a useful source of wire but if the windings are glued together then that’s for the scrap yard.

Buying a few reels of enamelled wire is not very expensive, once you are electronically hooked such stock allows you to have a very interesting time in the years to come.

 

Good luck,

Alan

G8LCO

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

 

jjpurdum
 

Also, no matter how I remove the enamel coating, I always check the leads with my DVM for continuity, just to make sure. I prefer to gently scrape the coating off with a box cutter, taking care not to nick the wire. To me, burning it off smells like feet...not my favorite.

Jack, W8TEE

On Thursday, August 23, 2018, 3:36:43 PM EDT, Alan <g8lco1@...> wrote:


Writing anything to this group  demands a little thought, most people seem to be starting in the hobby so don’t have the experience or piles of materials that others have.

 

A little enamel residue is not very significant but burning off the insulation is not a great idea from a respiration viewpoint, you also coat the copper with oxide which hinders soldering. An easy way of abrading off a little of the enamel is to use a tiny piece of fine sandpaper /wet & dry/ diamond file  to scratch the coating, solder and heat will do the rest. It is the work of a moment to tin a suitable enamelled wire-  not a big effort. But I do avoid breathing in the fume from the enamel- best avoided.

 

There are VERY MANY specialised coatings for motor windings and scan coils. Some are double layer, you wind the coil then heat with a high current to fuse the outer layers together, some coils are wound  using a  hot lacquer  spray during winding which is very solid indeed. Windings in induction motors can be malleted in place then varnished. But the majority of low cost wires are low temp self fluxing/ Solder through types- at least the ones made in the last 50 years. I would avoid the older dark varnishes- you might wind something complicated then discover that the brittle old enamel has caused an internal short.

 

Simple coils that are loose wound can be a useful source of wire but if the windings are glued together then that’s for the scrap yard.

Buying a few reels of enamelled wire is not very expensive, once you are electronically hooked such stock allows you to have a very interesting time in the years to come.

 

Good luck,

Alan

G8LCO

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

 

Allen Poland
 

I prefer to use a folded piece of very fine grit sandpaper.  Just pull the wire end through the folded sandpaper a few times and the varnish is gone.  No knicks…just bare wire!

 

From: QRPLabs@groups.io [mailto:QRPLabs@groups.io] On Behalf Of n3fel@... via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, August 22, 2018 1:22 PM
To: QRPLabs@groups.io
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] Winding QCX T1 #qcx #t1

 

I just completed my QCX40 and simpathize with others who were/are challenged by The T1. In my case I had to unwind one turn of the large coil and strip back the end insulation.  I must have nicked the wire trying to scrap it clean with a sharp exacto blade and when pulling it through one of the eight holes it broke off at the base of the coil.  Recommendation:  Don't scrape!  Use the flame sparingly from a butane lighter to burn off the insulation.  Then allow 10s heat time to solder the connection.  Hope this helps.  Howard, n3fel


Virus-free. www.avast.com

danielu@upcnet.ro danielu@upcnet.ro
 

     I hope I do not repeat something well known, but the best method for cleaning the wire regarding insulation is Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Heat the wire with a hot iron  over a pill of aspirin until the insulation turns into a black residue that is easily cleaned with a cloth. It smells of hot aspirin, but the wire remains intact.

Daniel

Jer Tres <ownselv@...>
 

Deserves a YouTube video
tnx

danielu@upcnet.ro danielu@upcnet.ro
 

Hello,

Here is the video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDEPMdDcPOk&feature=youtu.be

Best regards.


Daniel

terry murphy
 

Brilliant!


Thanks
Terry-W6LEO

ajparent1/KB1GMX
 

Over the years I've used a very hot iron and solder. 

Then i got a very small solder pot (about 1" wide and maybe 1" deep)
and its fast and effective when I need to strip a lot of enameled wire. 
Little rosin on the lead and dip it. Down side for the pot is about
10 minute warm up.

I have to try the hot air solder/desolder tool.

The other tool using two small drums (.5") of material like rubber with
abrasive embedded turned with a small motor.  It rotates so that the
wire is pulled in and does a fine job as you pull it out.  Really simple
and very effective.

I try to not scrape or sand as that usually weakens the wire.

Allison

Braden Glett
 

QRPguys use the easily burned off insulation wire, as well. If you download their manual for the regenerative SW receiver, it names the brand of wire.

Steve in Okinawa
 

Also the KD1JV kits sold by Pacific Antenna. Made the toroid installation very easy. 73 from Okinawa