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Opinion sought! What's the best Morse decoder/sender on any platform?


mister35mm
 

What's the best automated Morse decoder/sender on any platform?

My ears and wetware are not up to the task.

Something I can use with PC keyboard to send, as well.
--
Stephen Walters
G7VFY
07956-544202


jjpurdum
 

There are a lot of Open Source decoders out there, but none of them are perfect. Most do well on mechanical sending (e.g., W1AW code practice), but start to fail when humans get involved because they have their own "fist", especially with a hand key.

If you search "send Morse Code with keyboard", you'll get lots of hits. My old Arduino Projects for Amateur Radio book has a project centered around an old PS2 keyboard. (I bought mine for $0.50 at a church thrift store!) That's easy to do. Decoding CW is much more difficult and Hans' decoder is very good.

Jack, W8TEE

On Thursday, October 15, 2020, 9:33:48 AM EDT, mister35mm via groups.io <mister35mm@...> wrote:


What's the best automated Morse decoder/sender on any platform?

My ears and wetware are not up to the task.

Something I can use with PC keyboard to send, as well.
--
Stephen Walters
G7VFY
07956-544202





G Hopper
 

Are you thinking only of 'personal computer' based decoders/senders?  Or stand alone hardware like Arduinos, etc.?

Grant
KB7WSD


On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 6:33 AM mister35mm via groups.io <mister35mm=yahoo.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
What's the best automated Morse decoder/sender on any platform?

My ears and wetware are not up to the task.

Something I can use with PC keyboard to send, as well.
--
Stephen Walters
G7VFY
07956-544202






Dave Edwards
 

Yours ears and 'puter 'tween the headsets will do just fine.

Leaving it to an app will get you into trouble, with the first burst of static or QRM, wasting the other guys' time!


....Dave

On 10/15/20 9:31 AM, mister35mm via groups.io wrote:
What's the best automated Morse decoder/sender on any platform?

My ears and wetware are not up to the task.

Something I can use with PC keyboard to send, as well.


Jim Painter
 

The best I’ve found are Cwget and Cwtype.

Jim....KQ3S

On Oct 15, 2020, at 9:33 AM, mister35mm via groups.io <mister35mm=yahoo.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:

What's the best automated Morse decoder/sender on any platform?

My ears and wetware are not up to the task.

Something I can use with PC keyboard to send, as well.
--
Stephen Walters
G7VFY
07956-544202





Jean-Marc Meessen (ON4KJM)
 

>> Leaving it to an app will get you into trouble, with the first burst of static or QRM, wasting the other guys' time!
 
Agreeing with Dave: the human brain is currently much better than technology (at least for Morse code). See it more like an art or a skill to learn (and to be proud of). Start at it (there is a lot of good help out there) and one day, without consciously realizing it, you'll look around and say "waouw, I already achieved that". 
There are some good books on-line that explain this process. Each passed hurdle is a very satisfying feeling. 
 
I think that it is possible to participate to the CWops classes from the UK. I hear very good comments about their program. 
 
73 de ON4KJM
(working at his head copy skills and aiming to be member of the HSC)


Shane Justice
 

The Elecraft K3 I have does a great job of decoding Morse, as well as other modes on its display.

Otherwise, you might google around for a keyboard/display standalone device, or a soundcard based software package for your computer. There used to be a lot of those on the market, but I don't know of them. Perhaps others can point you in the right direction.

Best Regards,
Shane


On Oct 15, 2020 at 06:33, mister35mm via groups.io <mister35mm@...> wrote:

What's the best automated Morse decoder/sender on any platform?


My ears and wetware are not up to the task.

Something I can use with PC keyboard to send, as well.
--
Stephen Walters
G7VFY
07956-544202






Hajo Dezelski
 

Hello,

I agree with the Kx3, but really don't forget the QCX.

Try it with fake CW:
1. Learn the basics. All characters and numbers and try to decode your callsign by head. This goes along with the Q-abbreviations: gb, gl 73, ...
2. Using the QCX turn in on the right frequency including the side tone. and the QCX will decode like the Elecraft if the op on the other side is giving the letters correctly.
3. Programm the 10 text messages with your "call", "my name is xxx", "my qth is ...", "gb es gl", ...

And you could be on the air if you avoid contest the first three days ;-)

73 de Hajo 


James Daldry W4JED
 

Hi, Stephen

Does that include the one that I wrote in Commodore Basic 2 for the Vic20 back in 1983? Could send/receive up to 50 WPM, using the joystick fire button for send.

73

Jim W4JED

On 10/15/20 9:31 AM, mister35mm via groups.io wrote:
What's the best automated Morse decoder/sender on any platform?

My ears and wetware are not up to the task.

Something I can use with PC keyboard to send, as well.


Daniel Walter
 

I have a K3 and a QCX 40 $ 20 as well. The K3 does well with strong signals but doesn't do so well with weaker ones. I find the QCXs actually do a much better job with weaker signals and is also excellent with strong signals. I have tried a few software programs and they only work with near perfect signals.

I know there are some high end decoders that have a good reputation. I have no direct experience with them, but for the balance of cost and performance, I don't think you can beat the QCX. 
--
73, Dan  NM3A


Larry Taylor
 

Budd Churchward makes the MorseDuino. Connects to the headphone jack on any transceiver. It’s Arduino based. It’s an excellent kit on the same quality level you from Hans. 


Larry Taylor
 


Mike KK7ER
 

What do the RBN skimmers use?  They seem to read my (non-standard) fist with no problems.

73, Mike KK7ER


Ron Carr
 

Try Fldigi.  It may not be the best but it would be a good start.  I used Fldigi as a baseline when writing modem decoders for the TenTec rebel, the goal being to decode as good or better than Fldigi.  It wasn't easy to beat.

Ron K1URC


Russ@va3rr
 

K3NG has a morse decoder included with his well-known arduino keyer project. I would give the nod to the K5BCQ implementation, as it permits the entire sketch to be loaded on an arduino Mega.

Check out a video at http://m0fvd.uk/node/8


R. Tyson
 


3. Programm the 10 text messages with your "call", "my name is xxx", "my qth is ...", "gb es gl", ...

And you could be on the air if you avoid contest the first three days ;-)

That's O.K until the other person asks you a question !
Best advice... dont bother with a CW decoder unless you are in practice mode and want to check if your sending is O.K, even then don't practice sending until you have a decent level of reading ability.  Practice reading CW at a reasonably high speed maybe 18, 20 or 25 wpm. That way you don't have time to count dots and dashes. Don't write it down just learn to read it in your head. You will only be able to hear the odd letter or number at first then gradually words will be decoded in your head and then the progress will speed up.
It takes time and practice more of both as you get older and try to learn CW.

Reg                       G4NFR


Ken Bell
 

Apart from ears (trained by CW Academy!), I have found the decoder in fldigi to be the best I have used as long as it is setup properly.  Using the microphone will work, but it works best if fed the sound from a USB Soundcard.  If you click the WF button (bottom Left)  twice, you'll get an oscilloscope screen. On an S9 signal,  adjust the sound so that the sound wave doesn't exceed the two bars. Gain is set with the up/down buttons next to the WF button.  Set the Squelch (Bottom right) properly, then set the send speed at about the speed you expect to receive.  Supposedly this is the decode speed fldigi uses to start it's decoding.   For me this works well. YMMV.