Removing solder from holes


Stephen Farthing G0XAR JO92ON97
 

My favourite way is to heat up the solder with an iron then put a stainless steel pin in the hole and push the solder out. The solder won’t stick to stainless steel. These pins can be had in dressmaking shops and balsa wood model aircraft stashes…

Steve 


Paul Ross
 

Also (get from XYL) what are known as "tapestry" needles work well.


Bruce K1FFX
 

Wooden toothpicks also work well.

- Bruce K1FFX 


Don VE3IDS
 

I am having good results with this:


It doesn't have the recoil and jump that a non heated solder sucker has. The action is much smoother. It doesn't have the issue of stray solder blobs being splashed around because of the heated suction. Also good for burning off the enamel on toroid wires if you melt some solder in the hole in the tip and stick the wire end in the solder. 

73 Don ve3ids 

On Mon., Jul. 4, 2022, 7:38 p.m. Bruce K1FFX, <rosen.bruce@...> wrote:
Wooden toothpicks also work well.

- Bruce K1FFX 


Dennis Rieger
 

It's expensive but a HAKKO FR301 solder removal tool is the best way I have found to remove solder either from a hole or for component removal. It also works great for removing the enamel from wire when winding toroids.

Dennis
KK5DB


Trystan G0KAY
 

Indeed, a desoldering iron will desolder and leave a clean hole free of solder in no time.


Charles Johnson
 

It's expensive but a HAKKO FR301 solder removal tool is the best way I have found to remove solder either from a hole or for component removal.

I second this, though my unit is a Hakko 808. I don't recall exactly what I paid for it, but it's worth every penny. The only thing that's more valuable in terms of price vs performance is my thermal wire stripper. I recall it costing ~$400 USD, but it's more than paid for itself and makes wire stripping so much easier and precise!

Charles Johnson
KF4AYT


Donald S Brant Jr
 

I have had my Teledyne thermal stripper for decades and it is still doing its job flawlessly.  It is still the best (only?) way to strip PTFE- or Raychem-insulated wires and will not nick any wire strands, which is how broken wires start.  I started  working with them at RCA Astro in the '80s and I had to have my own.
73, Don N2VGU


Dan Quigg
 

Check your local specialty hardware stores for teensy-tiny drill bits.  I got mine at Fasten-All, Ace may even have them.  Take a board with you, to check the size(s) you need.  Mine was kinda pricey ~$2.00, well, pricey for a tiny drill bit.  Or you may be able to find an assortment on Amazon or ebay.  Just twirl the bit between your thumb & fingertip to drill out the remaining solder after you use the braid or a solder sucking device.  I've had good luck. YMMV, of course.

73 Dan


N5YYY
 

That looks great!  Note for my US friends that the one linked is listed at 220V:

 Input Voltage: AC 220~240V

I would love the Hakko unit, but the one you shared fits my wallet better... :-)

Thanks!
-Mark.  N5YYY


On Mon, Jul 4, 2022 at 5:12 PM Don VE3IDS <ve3ids.don@...> wrote:
I am having good results with this:


It doesn't have the recoil and jump that a non heated solder sucker has. The action is much smoother. It doesn't have the issue of stray solder blobs being splashed around because of the heated suction. Also good for burning off the enamel on toroid wires if you melt some solder in the hole in the tip and stick the wire end in the solder. 

73 Don ve3ids 

On Mon., Jul. 4, 2022, 7:38 p.m. Bruce K1FFX, <rosen.bruce@...> wrote:
Wooden toothpicks also work well.

- Bruce K1FFX 



--
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| R. Mark Adams, Ph.D.       |   "Information is light.      |
| Computational Biologist    |    Information in itself,     |
| http://www.epotential.com  |    about anything, is light." |
| rmadams@...     |       - Tom Stoppard          |


Don VE3IDS
 

Mark

When you order at that link, it gives you the choice of 120v with a North American plug. 

73 Don ve3ids 

On Thu., Jul. 7, 2022, 12:07 p.m. N5YYY, <rmadams@...> wrote:
That looks great!  Note for my US friends that the one linked is listed at 220V:

 Input Voltage: AC 220~240V

I would love the Hakko unit, but the one you shared fits my wallet better... :-)

Thanks!
-Mark.  N5YYY


On Mon, Jul 4, 2022 at 5:12 PM Don VE3IDS <ve3ids.don@...> wrote:
I am having good results with this:


It doesn't have the recoil and jump that a non heated solder sucker has. The action is much smoother. It doesn't have the issue of stray solder blobs being splashed around because of the heated suction. Also good for burning off the enamel on toroid wires if you melt some solder in the hole in the tip and stick the wire end in the solder. 

73 Don ve3ids 

On Mon., Jul. 4, 2022, 7:38 p.m. Bruce K1FFX, <rosen.bruce@...> wrote:
Wooden toothpicks also work well.

- Bruce K1FFX 



--
--
| R. Mark Adams, Ph.D.       |   "Information is light.      |
| Computational Biologist    |    Information in itself,     |
| http://www.epotential.com  |    about anything, is light." |
| rmadams@...     |       - Tom Stoppard          |


David Wilcox K8WPE
 

Check MicroMart. They sell all the tools for model railroad builders and have micro sized drill bits.

David J. Wilcox’s iPad

On Jul 7, 2022, at 11:42 AM, Dan Quigg via groups.io <twowindsbear@...> wrote:

Check your local specialty hardware stores for teensy-tiny drill bits.  I got mine at Fasten-All, Ace may even have them.  Take a board with you, to check the size(s) you need.  Mine was kinda pricey ~$2.00, well, pricey for a tiny drill bit.  Or you may be able to find an assortment on Amazon or ebay.  Just twirl the bit between your thumb & fingertip to drill out the remaining solder after you use the braid or a solder sucking device.  I've had good luck. YMMV, of course.

73 Dan


Vojtech Bubnik
 

Solder wick and flux work for me to clean up printed circuit after desoldering parts. After removing solder with solder wick and flux, I clean up the flux with cotton swab & alcohol.


Al Holt
 

It's nice having a few different widths of solder wick. I use 2mm and1.5mm most of the time on PCB's and some really fine 0.025" (.6mm) on smaller traces and holes.

Sometimes it helps to add some soldering paste to the wick to aid drawing out stubborn residual solder.

I have an old Paladin spring loaded solder sucker from the70's, but it jumps so badly it makes more of a mess than it helps.

73,

--Al
WD4AH


Daniel Walter
 

I have tried the micro drill bit technique. I am not a fan, as not infrequently, it also removes the plated through hole as well. While this is repairable, it is not a good thing. A solder sucker (of any type) or solder wick and flux are much better choices. 
--
73, Dan  NM3A


Don DeGregori
 

I tried this and mostly works. Add flux on hole. Put board in hobby vice not attached to work bench.
With left hand, hold vice. With right hand, hold tinned soldering iron. Apply to hole for some seconds.
Keep heating hole. Now pick up vice about 6 inches, still holding iron on hole. Come down fast and hard
to workbench. Plugged hole should clear.


Mark WO7T
 

After wiping the solder braid with some solder paste to impregnate the copper fibers (don't overdo it), I then snip
the braid at a sharp angle to have a very pointed part of the braid which I then try to impart into the clogged hole
as best I can with the rest over the pad.  My iron is generally set to 400' C, as I aim to be on and off the pad in 
about 2 seconds.  Those pointed fibers may only take up a tiny bit of solder, so cut off the end of the braid to
another sharp point and repeat if required.

I also found a sewing needle ideal to sort of work the hole open larger after I can see daylight through the pad.

GL es 73
Mark


Adam
 

Don DeGregori <ddegreg1@...> wrote:

I tried this and mostly works. Add flux on hole. Put board in hobby vice
not attached to work bench. With left hand, hold vice. With right hand,
hold tinned soldering iron. Apply to hole for some seconds. Keep heating
hole. Now pick up vice about 6 inches, still holding iron on hole. Come
down fast and hard to workbench. Plugged hole should clear.
I'm using a desoldering pump, and, for really stubborn holes, an air
compressor. The second method sometimes makes a mess (so safety glasses
are mandatory), but it works.