K6JTH's versatile stand for the QCX-mini


Mike Perry, WA4MP
 

K6JTH was kind enough to send me a sample of his 3D design for a QCX-mini stand and I’m impressed. Good design combines the simple with the versatile and this is both. Hans might want to look into offering these for sale along with the QCX-mini, since they’re unlikely to add anything to the shipping cost.
 
First, there are the two 3D-printed elements themselves.



Next is the moderate tilt angle suitable for a desktop.



Next is the greater tilt for perhaps a low picnic table or placed on the ground.




And finally, flipping the elements gives the standing position for when the QCX-mini is on a shelf at eye level.



All from one simple, sturdy and stable design. Brilliant!
 
And yes, I do need to remove that screen’s plastic protection.
 
—Mike Perry, WA4MP


Colin Kaminski
 

Thank you Mike! I am glad you enjoy it. 


Colin
K6JTH


Larry VE7EA
 

Colin: any chance you might put that out as open source on somewhere like Thingiverse?


Colin Kaminski
 

I would gladly send you the rev .3 file. I am still refining it. Right now there is no spring tension on the arms and I am finding that as the print ages it’s a little loose on the housing. I am going to add a couple of degrees of “toe-in” and print it again. Once I am happy I will add it to my thingverse page. 

Colin
K6JTH 

On Thu, Apr 7, 2022 at 8:21 AM Larry Gagnon <lagagnon@...> wrote:
Colin: any chance you might put that out as open source on somewhere like Thingiverse?


Larry VE7EA
 

Thanks Colin: I will await a more final version. Thanks for your contribution to the community!


John, KB2HSH
 

My wife actually printed my stand for mine 



John Marranca, Jr
-Field Technician V


Spectrum 
2604 Seneca Avenue 
Niagara Falls, NY 14305
716-431-2685



-------- Original message --------
From: Larry Gagnon <lagagnon@...>
Date: 4/7/22 6:45 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: QRPLabs@groups.io
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [QRPLabs] K6JTH's versatile stand for the QCX-mini

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Colin Kaminski
 

Okay, I edited the model today. I added 2 degrees of toe in and it is easy to install and stays tight. I also added a hook for upright use. The small hooks are to hang over an edge of a shelf, table or power supply to keep the radio stable during a button push. I have also added it to Thingiverse.

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:5352717

Colin
K6JTH


Mark N8MH
 

Thanks, Colin!  I just printed a pair, using your ver4 file.  Very nice, slipped right on the QCX-mini.  These were the second and third things printed on the new printer--first thing was the test dog file..

(Btw--another market obviously suffering from supply chain issues evidently is the 3D printer world...took me 2 days to track down a firmware file for the "new compatible" cpu they are using (in a Ender 3 Pro) that supports their CR touch add on..  Anyhow, github to the rescue....)

73!
Mark N8MH


KK4ITX John
 

How long did it take to make them ? I may try to get someone to make up a pair for my Mini.

John
KK4ITX 

🙃Each mistake is a learning opportunity.🙂

On Apr 15, 2022, at 4:29 PM, Mark N8MH <marklhammond@...> wrote:

Thanks, Colin!  I just printed a pair, using your ver4 file.  Very nice, slipped right on the QCX-mini.  These were the second and third things printed on the new printer--first thing was the test dog file..

(Btw--another market obviously suffering from supply chain issues evidently is the 3D printer world...took me 2 days to track down a firmware file for the "new compatible" cpu they are using (in a Ender 3 Pro) that supports their CR touch add on..  Anyhow, github to the rescue....)

73!
Mark N8MH


Mark N8MH
 

It took two days to get the right firmware ;)   It seems like it was well under an hour to print each one...pretty quick.  I started them and walked away...so didn't pay attention to the actual time!

73,
Mark N8MH


Colin Kaminski
 

If I print in high quality mode, it is 3.5 hours per pair. 

Colin
K6JTH 

On Fri, Apr 15, 2022 at 3:35 PM Mark N8MH <marklhammond@...> wrote:
It took two days to get the right firmware ;)   It seems like it was well under an hour to print each one...pretty quick.  I started them and walked away...so didn't pay attention to the actual time!

73,
Mark N8MH


KK4ITX John
 

Thanks for the response, in my former life I did some CNC programming so I really was trying to get a feel for the printing time vs 3D.

I wonder if making 2 a time would be quicker ? …… no answer required.

Thanks,

John
KK4ITX 

🙃Each mistake is a learning opportunity.🙂

On Apr 15, 2022, at 6:36 PM, Colin Kaminski <colinskaminski@...> wrote:


If I print in high quality mode, it is 3.5 hours per pair. 

Colin
K6JTH 

On Fri, Apr 15, 2022 at 3:35 PM Mark N8MH <marklhammond@...> wrote:
It took two days to get the right firmware ;)   It seems like it was well under an hour to print each one...pretty quick.  I started them and walked away...so didn't pay attention to the actual time!

73,
Mark N8MH


Colin Kaminski
 

Like a CNC, the tool time is the same. It is the bed loading time that gets reduced. I could fit at least 3 pairs on the bed. The print time would be 3 times as long. But I would save about 30 minutes in prep time. Also, I could start a print before bed and wake up to 3 sets instead of 1 set. 

Colin

On Fri, Apr 15, 2022 at 4:12 PM KK4ITX John via groups.io <jleahy00=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks for the response, in my former life I did some CNC programming so I really was trying to get a feel for the printing time vs 3D.

I wonder if making 2 a time would be quicker ? …… no answer required.

Thanks,

John
KK4ITX 

🙃Each mistake is a learning opportunity.🙂

On Apr 15, 2022, at 6:36 PM, Colin Kaminski <colinskaminski@...> wrote:


If I print in high quality mode, it is 3.5 hours per pair. 

Colin
K6JTH 

On Fri, Apr 15, 2022 at 3:35 PM Mark N8MH <marklhammond@...> wrote:
It took two days to get the right firmware ;)   It seems like it was well under an hour to print each one...pretty quick.  I started them and walked away...so didn't pay attention to the actual time!

73,
Mark N8MH


KK4ITX John
 

Thanks Colin, I was wondering about the setup also but didn’t want to create too much chatter here.  I just don’t happen the space and atmosphere here for one of those neat toys !

John
KK4ITX 

🙃Each mistake is a learning opportunity.🙂

On Apr 15, 2022, at 7:24 PM, Colin Kaminski <colinskaminski@...> wrote:


Like a CNC, the tool time is the same. It is the bed loading time that gets reduced. I could fit at least 3 pairs on the bed. The print time would be 3 times as long. But I would save about 30 minutes in prep time. Also, I could start a print before bed and wake up to 3 sets instead of 1 set. 

Colin

On Fri, Apr 15, 2022 at 4:12 PM KK4ITX John via groups.io <jleahy00=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks for the response, in my former life I did some CNC programming so I really was trying to get a feel for the printing time vs 3D.

I wonder if making 2 a time would be quicker ? …… no answer required.

Thanks,

John
KK4ITX 

🙃Each mistake is a learning opportunity.🙂

On Apr 15, 2022, at 6:36 PM, Colin Kaminski <colinskaminski@...> wrote:


If I print in high quality mode, it is 3.5 hours per pair. 

Colin
K6JTH 

On Fri, Apr 15, 2022 at 3:35 PM Mark N8MH <marklhammond@...> wrote:
It took two days to get the right firmware ;)   It seems like it was well under an hour to print each one...pretty quick.  I started them and walked away...so didn't pay attention to the actual time!

73,
Mark N8MH


Paul Christensen
 

Can anyone recommend a U.S. online 3D printing services vendor with no minimum charge orders?  

Paul, W9AC


Bob Benedict, KD8CGH
 

Paul
   Many libraries have 3D printers that you can use for the cost of the filament. The librarian will usually help if you need it.
--
  73
    KD8CGH


Jim Strohm
 

If the demand were high enough and the profit margin high enough, I could clear out my garage and install a dozen 3D printers and a laser etcher or two.   

But … would people use my services, and would they pay me?   As a ham since 1984, I know how gloriously cheap we all are. 

Just a fer-instance, what would you pay for a pair of QCX /QDX stands?  This isn’t an offer to sell, just a preliminary marketing research question.   

73
Jim N6OTQ 


Sent from my quenched-gap spark transmitter. 

On Apr 16, 2022, at 6:04 AM, Bob Benedict, KD8CGH <rkayakr@...> wrote:

Paul
   Many libraries have 3D printers that you can use for the cost of the filament. The librarian will usually help if you need it.
--
  73
    KD8CGH


KK4ITX John
 

Jim,

The answer to your question is of course yes and you probably will get paid for what you do BUT as a former business owner you need a formula for pricing in order to make it all worthwhile and appealing to your customers.

1.  Know your costs and apply them to each part made.  Not only is this the material used for each item but also for the mistakes you make.  The equipment will need repairs and replacement, the costs need to be determined either by the hour or amount of material used.  And don't forget the utility needs and cost.

2.  Your consultation time, programming and setup all need to be determined and figured in. 

3.  And finally your desired profit over and above all costs determines the price.

In order to reach some of those numbers you need to do a time study based on your particular operation for setup, cleanup and so on.

What we did in the PCB business was study those very things, drill size changes, average breakage of drills, potty breaks and so on.  I developed a computer program for this after a while and could predict within a few minutes how long jobs should take.  This info was passed on to the quoting department and they added Overhead Costs (COH) and desired profits.

The only way for you to know for sure is to try it.  If you already have a machine and want to go down this road, then try the above and don't be afraid to put out some prices and see what happens.  I was 47 when I moved 1,300 miles and started out on my own and I have never been sorry, nor rich either, except in knowledge. 

I have looked at buying a machine but much of what I would use it for can be made far cheaper and quicker using other methods ie: casting or jig saw so be careful in product selection.

Start small and expand if you enjoy it and at least break even.

GL,

John
KK4ITX



Click Here for Zephyrhills Area Amateur Radio Club
Many of life's failures are people who
did not realize how close they were to
success when they gave up.
       Thomas A. Edison     


On Saturday, April 16, 2022, 09:59:17 AM EDT, Jim Strohm <jim.strohm@...> wrote:


If the demand were high enough and the profit margin high enough, I could clear out my garage and install a dozen 3D printers and a laser etcher or two.   

But … would people use my services, and would they pay me?   As a ham since 1984, I know how gloriously cheap we all are. 

Just a fer-instance, what would you pay for a pair of QCX /QDX stands?  This isn’t an offer to sell, just a preliminary marketing research question.   

73
Jim N6OTQ 


Sent from my quenched-gap spark transmitter. 

On Apr 16, 2022, at 6:04 AM, Bob Benedict, KD8CGH <rkayakr@...> wrote:

Paul
   Many libraries have 3D printers that you can use for the cost of the filament. The librarian will usually help if you need it.
--
  73
    KD8CGH


Jim Strohm
 

Wise words, John.  

Especially your remarks about looking at other manufacturing hardware.    The big advantage of 3D printing is that essentially no tooling is required for each new product, aside from programming time and cost.   The big disadvantages are the cost in feedstock and run time.  

There’s a crossover on costs on all of these factors.   And that’s something I need to work on.   Also, I’m not looking to put injection molding equipment in my garage, nor to learn how to make the necessary tooling.  

However, if I saw a market for CNC aluminum bits and pieces, and anodizing them, I’d consider that too.  I’ve only got 100 amp service, but if I could run tooling at night and ship product in the daytime, that would make me happy.  

73
Jim N6OTQ 
  

Sent from my quenched-gap spark transmitter. 

On Apr 16, 2022, at 10:01 AM, KK4ITX John via groups.io <jleahy00@...> wrote:


Jim,

The answer to your question is of course yes and you probably will get paid for what you do BUT as a former business owner you need a formula for pricing in order to make it all worthwhile and appealing to your customers.

1.  Know your costs and apply them to each part made.  Not only is this the material used for each item but also for the mistakes you make.  The equipment will need repairs and replacement, the costs need to be determined either by the hour or amount of material used.  And don't forget the utility needs and cost.

2.  Your consultation time, programming and setup all need to be determined and figured in. 

3.  And finally your desired profit over and above all costs determines the price.

In order to reach some of those numbers you need to do a time study based on your particular operation for setup, cleanup and so on.

What we did in the PCB business was study those very things, drill size changes, average breakage of drills, potty breaks and so on.  I developed a computer program for this after a while and could predict within a few minutes how long jobs should take.  This info was passed on to the quoting department and they added Overhead Costs (COH) and desired profits.

The only way for you to know for sure is to try it.  If you already have a machine and want to go down this road, then try the above and don't be afraid to put out some prices and see what happens.  I was 47 when I moved 1,300 miles and started out on my own and I have never been sorry, nor rich either, except in knowledge. 

I have looked at buying a machine but much of what I would use it for can be made far cheaper and quicker using other methods ie: casting or jig saw so be careful in product selection.

Start small and expand if you enjoy it and at least break even.

GL,

John
KK4ITX



Click Here for Zephyrhills Area Amateur Radio Club
Many of life's failures are people who
did not realize how close they were to
success when they gave up.
       Thomas A. Edison     


On Saturday, April 16, 2022, 09:59:17 AM EDT, Jim Strohm <jim.strohm@...> wrote:


If the demand were high enough and the profit margin high enough, I could clear out my garage and install a dozen 3D printers and a laser etcher or two.   

But … would people use my services, and would they pay me?   As a ham since 1984, I know how gloriously cheap we all are. 

Just a fer-instance, what would you pay for a pair of QCX /QDX stands?  This isn’t an offer to sell, just a preliminary marketing research question.   

73
Jim N6OTQ 


Sent from my quenched-gap spark transmitter. 

On Apr 16, 2022, at 6:04 AM, Bob Benedict, KD8CGH <rkayakr@...> wrote:

Paul
   Many libraries have 3D printers that you can use for the cost of the filament. The librarian will usually help if you need it.
--
  73
    KD8CGH


William Smith
 

Unless you are doing this anyway as a hobby, and already have a printer, your startup costs (and learning curve) are going to be substantial.

I've been doing this as a hobby for quite a while now, and my SWAG of a buck an hour for the machine time and 10 cents a gram for the material seem to work well for me, though again, since it's a hobby I don't need to break even (or even track my costs that closely).  Do I amortize the cost of the closet under the stairs in my condo that I had built out for the printer, and if so, what's the lifetime of it?  Way too complex.  What fraction of the CAT5 and AC power wiring that I had done is directly attributable to the 3D printer, and how do I roll that into the cost?

I made a set of these for someone recently, charged $25 including shipping, and came out a little behind where I thought I would, but probably wouldn't bother to 'fix' it for the next print, as the costs above are enough of a guess that I'm sure I didn't come out behind.

3DHubs.com pricing is about 4x what I'm charging, but then the people selling services there are actually trying to make a profit.

How many QCX units are out there, how do you find the owners, market to them, and fulfil orders, and still 'compete' with me (or the local library)?  Should you slip Colin a buck a pair for his design work?  Is it worth looking over some of the other designs on Thingiverse?  QCX, QCX-Mini, QDX?  Thingiverse and other Creative Commons licenses? Lots to think about.

How to make a small fortune in 3D Printing?  Start with a large fortune.  8*)

73, Willie N1JBJ

On Apr 16, 2022, at 9:59 AM, Jim Strohm <jim.strohm@...> wrote:

If the demand were high enough and the profit margin high enough, I could clear out my garage and install a dozen 3D printers and a laser etcher or two.   

But … would people use my services, and would they pay me?   As a ham since 1984, I know how gloriously cheap we all are. 

Just a fer-instance, what would you pay for a pair of QCX /QDX stands?  This isn’t an offer to sell, just a preliminary marketing research question.   

73
Jim N6OTQ 


Sent from my quenched-gap spark transmitter. 

On Apr 16, 2022, at 6:04 AM, Bob Benedict, KD8CGH <rkayakr@...> wrote:

Paul
   Many libraries have 3D printers that you can use for the cost of the filament. The librarian will usually help if you need it.
--
  73
    KD8CGH