unsoldering - a bit off topic


Syd
 

Recently I had to solder in a SMA PC mounted connector and then, for some reason, I had to take it out.  Heating up the pads (of a very good heat sink)  and trying to remove it one pin at a time with a screwdriver was no help, neither was using solder wick  or  a solder pump. I recently bought an surface mount solder and unsoldering tutorial kit to learn more about installing and uninstalling surface mounted devices. It came with special solder flux and and something called 'FastChip', a low temperature solder alloy! One can flood all the solder pads and the solder will not solidify for several minutes so one can remove large surface mount ICs with a set of tweezers. So I took out a piece of 'Fast Chip' and flooded the 5 terminals to the SMA connector and all of a sudden the whole thing just fell off the board!  This might come in handy for removing high heat capacity metal items from PC boards without damaging the board!
73
wt1v


M Carroll
 

Thanks for the excellent tip about slow-solidifying chip removal material! I found Fast Chip and Chip Quick on Amazon. It's not cheap but it can definitely help remove modern pcb components without spending a lot of money on special desoldering equipment that might be seldom used.

W4AEE

On Sun, Jan 2, 2022, 12:09 PM Syd via groups.io <nhuq1=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Recently I had to solder in a SMA PC mounted connector and then, for some reason, I had to take it out.  Heating up the pads (of a very good heat sink)  and trying to remove it one pin at a time with a screwdriver was no help, neither was using solder wick  or  a solder pump. I recently bought an surface mount solder and unsoldering tutorial kit to learn more about installing and uninstalling surface mounted devices. It came with special solder flux and and something called 'FastChip', a low temperature solder alloy! One can flood all the solder pads and the solder will not solidify for several minutes so one can remove large surface mount ICs with a set of tweezers. So I took out a piece of 'Fast Chip' and flooded the 5 terminals to the SMA connector and all of a sudden the whole thing just fell off the board!  This might come in handy for removing high heat capacity metal items from PC boards without damaging the board!
73
wt1v


Mike Easterbrook
 

I originally thought Chip Quick a bit expensive but in desperation gave in and tried it.   The trick is that you only need very small quantities of the alloy. I've used it with SMD, thru hole and larger items too and still got a lot left a year or more later.  The other advantage of being miserly is that clean-up is much easier.  The liquid flux supplied with the kit is also very effective.

Slightly off-topic - I always found desoldering wick difficult to use - then in a rare moment of brain involvement it occured to me that desoldering had a lot in common with soldering i.e. get the heat in the right place, clean/bright surfaces and plenty of flux.  I don't recall having seen this written anywhere but am sure it's there somewhere.  So a quick polish-up of the wick with steel wool, a drop of liquid flux, nice hot iron and it works like a charm. Oh - all those wasted hours of frustration.  I can almost hear all the chuckling (60 years in the hobby and he didn't know this) anyway better late than never!

Mike 9M2LXM (currently 9V1LX)  

On Mon, Jan 3, 2022 at 11:06 AM M Carroll <mikecn10ec@...> wrote:
Thanks for the excellent tip about slow-solidifying chip removal material! I found Fast Chip and Chip Quick on Amazon. It's not cheap but it can definitely help remove modern pcb components without spending a lot of money on special desoldering equipment that might be seldom used.

W4AEE

On Sun, Jan 2, 2022, 12:09 PM Syd via groups.io <nhuq1=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Recently I had to solder in a SMA PC mounted connector and then, for some reason, I had to take it out.  Heating up the pads (of a very good heat sink)  and trying to remove it one pin at a time with a screwdriver was no help, neither was using solder wick  or  a solder pump. I recently bought an surface mount solder and unsoldering tutorial kit to learn more about installing and uninstalling surface mounted devices. It came with special solder flux and and something called 'FastChip', a low temperature solder alloy! One can flood all the solder pads and the solder will not solidify for several minutes so one can remove large surface mount ICs with a set of tweezers. So I took out a piece of 'Fast Chip' and flooded the 5 terminals to the SMA connector and all of a sudden the whole thing just fell off the board!  This might come in handy for removing high heat capacity metal items from PC boards without damaging the board!
73
wt1v


geoffrey pike
 

Yeah dose the braid in liquid flux is a method i use and it can be very effective, and i believe you need to keep desolder
braid out of direct sunlight, no problem here in Northern Ireland!
cheers
Geoff
GI0GDP


On Monday, 3 January 2022, 04:19:55 GMT, Mike Easterbrook <mike.easterbrook.2012@...> wrote:


I originally thought Chip Quick a bit expensive but in desperation gave in and tried it.   The trick is that you only need very small quantities of the alloy. I've used it with SMD, thru hole and larger items too and still got a lot left a year or more later.  The other advantage of being miserly is that clean-up is much easier.  The liquid flux supplied with the kit is also very effective.

Slightly off-topic - I always found desoldering wick difficult to use - then in a rare moment of brain involvement it occured to me that desoldering had a lot in common with soldering i.e. get the heat in the right place, clean/bright surfaces and plenty of flux.  I don't recall having seen this written anywhere but am sure it's there somewhere.  So a quick polish-up of the wick with steel wool, a drop of liquid flux, nice hot iron and it works like a charm. Oh - all those wasted hours of frustration.  I can almost hear all the chuckling (60 years in the hobby and he didn't know this) anyway better late than never!

Mike 9M2LXM (currently 9V1LX)  

On Mon, Jan 3, 2022 at 11:06 AM M Carroll <mikecn10ec@...> wrote:
Thanks for the excellent tip about slow-solidifying chip removal material! I found Fast Chip and Chip Quick on Amazon. It's not cheap but it can definitely help remove modern pcb components without spending a lot of money on special desoldering equipment that might be seldom used.

W4AEE

On Sun, Jan 2, 2022, 12:09 PM Syd via groups.io <nhuq1=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Recently I had to solder in a SMA PC mounted connector and then, for some reason, I had to take it out.  Heating up the pads (of a very good heat sink)  and trying to remove it one pin at a time with a screwdriver was no help, neither was using solder wick  or  a solder pump. I recently bought an surface mount solder and unsoldering tutorial kit to learn more about installing and uninstalling surface mounted devices. It came with special solder flux and and something called 'FastChip', a low temperature solder alloy! One can flood all the solder pads and the solder will not solidify for several minutes so one can remove large surface mount ICs with a set of tweezers. So I took out a piece of 'Fast Chip' and flooded the 5 terminals to the SMA connector and all of a sudden the whole thing just fell off the board!  This might come in handy for removing high heat capacity metal items from PC boards without damaging the board!
73
wt1v


R. Tyson
 

On Mon, Jan 3, 2022 at 04:19 AM, Mike Easterbrook wrote:
Slightly off-topic - I always found desoldering wick difficult to use - then in a rare moment of brain involvement it occured to me that desoldering had a lot in common with soldering i.e. get the heat in the right place, clean/bright surfaces and plenty of flux
For easy results I find the use of liquid flux helps enormously. Works like magic. A small amount on the joint and another small amount on the braid and it becomes so easy, as well as cleaning up the pads ready to solder in the new component.

Reg                 G4NFR


David Wilcox K8WPE
 

Mike,

The trick to using solder wick is to dip it in flux first.  Then it will draw the solder up into it. Without the flux first it has to get much hotter and won’t draw as much solder. Found it after a frustrating try dry and then with nothing to lose dipped it in the can of old flux I had and Presto….. worked like a charm.  Be careful with steel wool as it sheds little pieces that can not be seen but can cause other miseries.

Dave K8WPE

David J. Wilcox’s iPad

On Jan 2, 2022, at 11:19 PM, Mike Easterbrook <mike.easterbrook.2012@...> wrote:


I originally thought Chip Quick a bit expensive but in desperation gave in and tried it.   The trick is that you only need very small quantities of the alloy. I've used it with SMD, thru hole and larger items too and still got a lot left a year or more later.  The other advantage of being miserly is that clean-up is much easier.  The liquid flux supplied with the kit is also very effective.

Slightly off-topic - I always found desoldering wick difficult to use - then in a rare moment of brain involvement it occured to me that desoldering had a lot in common with soldering i.e. get the heat in the right place, clean/bright surfaces and plenty of flux.  I don't recall having seen this written anywhere but am sure it's there somewhere.  So a quick polish-up of the wick with steel wool, a drop of liquid flux, nice hot iron and it works like a charm. Oh - all those wasted hours of frustration.  I can almost hear all the chuckling (60 years in the hobby and he didn't know this) anyway better late than never!

Mike 9M2LXM (currently 9V1LX)  

On Mon, Jan 3, 2022 at 11:06 AM M Carroll <mikecn10ec@...> wrote:
Thanks for the excellent tip about slow-solidifying chip removal material! I found Fast Chip and Chip Quick on Amazon. It's not cheap but it can definitely help remove modern pcb components without spending a lot of money on special desoldering equipment that might be seldom used.

W4AEE

On Sun, Jan 2, 2022, 12:09 PM Syd via groups.io <nhuq1=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Recently I had to solder in a SMA PC mounted connector and then, for some reason, I had to take it out.  Heating up the pads (of a very good heat sink)  and trying to remove it one pin at a time with a screwdriver was no help, neither was using solder wick  or  a solder pump. I recently bought an surface mount solder and unsoldering tutorial kit to learn more about installing and uninstalling surface mounted devices. It came with special solder flux and and something called 'FastChip', a low temperature solder alloy! One can flood all the solder pads and the solder will not solidify for several minutes so one can remove large surface mount ICs with a set of tweezers. So I took out a piece of 'Fast Chip' and flooded the 5 terminals to the SMA connector and all of a sudden the whole thing just fell off the board!  This might come in handy for removing high heat capacity metal items from PC boards without damaging the board!
73
wt1v


Mike Easterbrook
 

Yes that mirrors my learning process with braid exactly.

 Love/hate relationship with steel wool! I use it in an area as far away as possible from any electronics.


On Mon, 3 Jan 2022, 19:06 David Wilcox K8WPE via groups.io, <Djwilcox01=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mike,

The trick to using solder wick is to dip it in flux first.  Then it will draw the solder up into it. Without the flux first it has to get much hotter and won’t draw as much solder. Found it after a frustrating try dry and then with nothing to lose dipped it in the can of old flux I had and Presto….. worked like a charm.  Be careful with steel wool as it sheds little pieces that can not be seen but can cause other miseries.

Dave K8WPE

David J. Wilcox’s iPad

On Jan 2, 2022, at 11:19 PM, Mike Easterbrook <mike.easterbrook.2012@...> wrote:


I originally thought Chip Quick a bit expensive but in desperation gave in and tried it.   The trick is that you only need very small quantities of the alloy. I've used it with SMD, thru hole and larger items too and still got a lot left a year or more later.  The other advantage of being miserly is that clean-up is much easier.  The liquid flux supplied with the kit is also very effective.

Slightly off-topic - I always found desoldering wick difficult to use - then in a rare moment of brain involvement it occured to me that desoldering had a lot in common with soldering i.e. get the heat in the right place, clean/bright surfaces and plenty of flux.  I don't recall having seen this written anywhere but am sure it's there somewhere.  So a quick polish-up of the wick with steel wool, a drop of liquid flux, nice hot iron and it works like a charm. Oh - all those wasted hours of frustration.  I can almost hear all the chuckling (60 years in the hobby and he didn't know this) anyway better late than never!

Mike 9M2LXM (currently 9V1LX)  

On Mon, Jan 3, 2022 at 11:06 AM M Carroll <mikecn10ec@...> wrote:
Thanks for the excellent tip about slow-solidifying chip removal material! I found Fast Chip and Chip Quick on Amazon. It's not cheap but it can definitely help remove modern pcb components without spending a lot of money on special desoldering equipment that might be seldom used.

W4AEE

On Sun, Jan 2, 2022, 12:09 PM Syd via groups.io <nhuq1=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Recently I had to solder in a SMA PC mounted connector and then, for some reason, I had to take it out.  Heating up the pads (of a very good heat sink)  and trying to remove it one pin at a time with a screwdriver was no help, neither was using solder wick  or  a solder pump. I recently bought an surface mount solder and unsoldering tutorial kit to learn more about installing and uninstalling surface mounted devices. It came with special solder flux and and something called 'FastChip', a low temperature solder alloy! One can flood all the solder pads and the solder will not solidify for several minutes so one can remove large surface mount ICs with a set of tweezers. So I took out a piece of 'Fast Chip' and flooded the 5 terminals to the SMA connector and all of a sudden the whole thing just fell off the board!  This might come in handy for removing high heat capacity metal items from PC boards without damaging the board!
73
wt1v


Eike Lantzsch
 

On Montag, 3. Januar 2022 08:27:11 -03 Mike Easterbrook wrote:
Yes that mirrors my learning process with braid exactly.

Love/hate relationship with steel wool! I use it in an area as far
away as possible from any electronics.

On Mon, 3 Jan 2022, 19:06 David Wilcox K8WPE via groups.io,
<Djwilcox01=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mike,
If using a soft, white rubber eraser does not work I use a glas fibre
pencil. That has the disadvantage of minute glas fibre shreds being
somewhat dangerous to your health. Be careful not to blow on it as it
might enter into your eyes. Use a pair of safety goggles and and a
surgeon's mask. Bits sticking in one's skin of the fingers also is at
least uncomfortable. But at least it does not cause any short circuits
in the electronics.

That reminds me: when the Internet and telecom guys came to install glas
fibre here I had to teach them to stick the broken glasfibre peaces onto
some insulating tape and after finishing the job carefully wrapping it in
some more insulating tape to discard it into the trash bin.
They were just letting it drop onto the floor and I: "Hey, don't do that!
Here are kids and cats running barefoot! &$$§"$%!"

73 de Eike ZP6CGE


Daniel Walter
 

Syd et al,
 I also had great luck using ChipQuick to remove a bad op amp on my rev 1 QCX mini. But be sure to completely remove the ChipQuick with solder wick or a desoldering device before soldering the new part in place. Otherwise that low melting point may come back to bite you later. 
--
73, Dan  NM3A


Chuck ke9uw
 

The Hakko desoldering gun is also good for sucking the solder and pin debris of the pcb after cutting an smd off the board.
The Hakko has changed my desoldering life.


Syd
 

Mike
I tried dipping in flux and using various widths of wick. Still had to go to use ChipQuick. I guess it all depends of the size of the heat sinking material that you solder into the board. In my case a solder on SMA connector was a big enough heat sink to screw up all the other normal process to remove with flux, wick, and desoldering pumps.
73 wt1v