Hobby RC receiver #avr #rcvr #si5351b #analog


freefuel@...
 

Calling on all Hobby RC enthusiasts! I'm interested to know who else if any would like a frequency agile Hobby RC receiver built  up around the Si5351 and a micro for controlling their R/C models on the Ham or other legal bands available globally. 

My interest as an American is primarily focussed on the use of part 15 unlicensed and ISM bands below the ubiquitous 2.4GHz (IMHO 2.4GHz has already become the Circus Band of the 21st Century!)  

Justin N2TOH


Wes AE6ZM
 

An intriguing idea Justin. As an RC flyer for many decades, the aspect of building my own equipment (radio) has always been on my mind. Back in my early years, there were a few hams who had TX/RX gear on the 6M band. I never had any, but thought it would be interesting to play with. When you refer to 'frequency agile' are you meaning something like the spread spectrum equipment currently available commercially. That would be really something if we could easily build our own stuff using that technology. As far as using the Part 15 frequency allocations I wonder how we could accomplish that, as the cost to get the TX side gear certified would be quite costly. I have heard that one of the big RC vending companies just recently got crosswise with the FCC for selling RC gear to hobbyists that was not FCC certified, so we would not want to go that route. However, if using ham band allocations, we could build our own without needing certs.
Tell us more about your plan. 
--
> I finally got it all together...now I can't remember where I put it<

VY 73,
Wes

AE6ZM

Sierra Vista, AZ

 


freefuel@...
 

Wes 

1) Yeah initially 50MHz Ham band stuff, keep in mind I understand the use of the ISM bands is rather liberal when you consider there are multi kilowatt processes using those bands! and we at most would be running a hand full of milliwatts.
2) to keep it simple to start with I am looking at the older specifications so AM/FM using PWM, PPM, PCM standards. Futaba S.Bus has some crazy data rate for it's serial packets running @ roughly 100Kilobits/sec, thus why it's on 2.4GHz this link goes along way to explaining many but not all the differences between the systems over the years. https://oscarliang.com/pwm-ppm-sbus-dsm2-dsmx-sumd-difference/
3) part of my long term goal is having RF link fault tolerance by implementing multi band links to the craft. likely with a combiner box between the RF bricks and the Flight Control board. 

Justin N2TOH
 


freefuel@...
 

heh Sorry 

0) frequency agile as in the TX/RX frequency can be assigned by the end user. 

Justin N2TOH


Ron Carr
 

Although it is always fun to do it yourself, you might want to look at the Taranis R9 system.  I understand one can setup  two links, one on 2.4 gig and a 2nd on 900mhz as a redundant system.  And with telemetry and at very reasonable prices.


freefuel@...
 

On Tue, Aug 25, 2020 at 08:00 AM, Ron Carr wrote:
Ah very cool this sort of RC radio gear mostly already exists, https://www.frsky-rc.com/product/r9/  now to see about conjuring something that works with the older VHF low and HF bands while still outputting S.Bus to plug into a multi receiver compatible system. 

Justin N2TOH