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What conduit can do it - way OT


KI7MWA
 

This question comes from out in Left Field...but I couldn't think of a better place to start an inquiry...

I need to run my coax feed line through a mess of plumbing/wiring/metal studs/etc.  There is no straight shot through, so rigid conduit is out.  Standard flex conduit is a pain in the *ss.  I was thinking about using pex-al-pex.  Do I need the extra shielding?  Would standard pex be just fine?  

Thoughts?  Other options?  Forget the whole thing?


Michael N6MST
 

First off, is it even necessary to use conduit in your situation? If so, what kind of coax? If you actually do need to protect the cable from damage and need it to be flexible you could use a rubber garden hose.


KI7MWA
 

It is more the "pushing on a noodle" problem.  I need enough rigidity to shove it through the places I can't reach, but not so much I can't work it around obstructions.  And, there is a problem with the metal studs, that often have sharp edges that could savage the coax outer jacket.


K2DB Paul Mackanos
 



On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 11:09 AM KI7MWA via groups.io <entilleser=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
It is more the "pushing on a noodle" problem.  I need enough rigidity to shove it through the places I can't reach, but not so much I can't work it around obstructions.  And, there is a problem with the metal studs, that often have sharp edges that could savage the coax outer jacket.


Michael N6MST
 

Ah, that makes sense. If regular pex is flexible enough then I think that sounds like a good option.


KI7MWA
 

I suppose I should also mention that the route will be taking the feed line past things like a 120VAC to 12VDC transformer.


geoff M0ORE
 

Move the shack with a  a shorter run. Seriously, use best quality coax to reduce noise from the wiring.

On 09/07/2020 15:43, KI7MWA via groups.io wrote:
This question comes from out in Left Field...but I couldn't think of a better place to start an inquiry...

I need to run my coax feed line through a mess of plumbing/wiring/metal studs/etc.  There is no straight shot through, so rigid conduit is out.  Standard flex conduit is a pain in the *ss.  I was thinking about using pex-al-pex.  Do I need the extra shielding?  Would standard pex be just fine?  

Thoughts?  Other options?  Forget the whole thing?


Bill NF6R
 

Another way is to tie a small weights (nuts, washers, roll of electrical tape) to a string and throw it across the area.  Don't use anything that you can't afford to lose (car keys, wedding band).  Works well in a drop ceiling.
--

Bill - NF6R
SKCC 20696 NAQCC 9984 LICWC 690 FISTS 19479 CalQRP 78 Flying Pigs 4181


Gwen Patton
 

When I had to run network cabling for work, I got a cheap RC tank from Radio Shack, took off the turret, and used it to tow a string to where the cable had to go. It could roll over the hung ceiling frames and such because it had treads instead of wheels, it was lightweight, radio controlled, and without the turret was only about 5 inches high. Then I'd attach the cable to the string and pull it through.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
73,
Gwen, NG3P


On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 11:59 AM Bill NF6R <nf6r.bill@...> wrote:
Another way is to tie a small weights (nuts, washers, roll of electrical tape) to a string and throw it across the area.  Don't use anything that you can't afford to lose (car keys, wedding band).  Works well in a drop ceiling.
--

Bill - NF6R
SKCC 20696 NAQCC 9984 LICWC 690 FISTS 19479 CalQRP 78 Flying Pigs 4181


Dave
 

Brilliant!  And fun too!

Dave


On Jul 9, 2020, at 14:31, Gwen Patton <ardrhi@...> wrote:


When I had to run network cabling for work, I got a cheap RC tank from Radio Shack, took off the turret, and used it to tow a string to where the cable had to go. It could roll over the hung ceiling frames and such because it had treads instead of wheels, it was lightweight, radio controlled, and without the turret was only about 5 inches high. Then I'd attach the cable to the string and pull it through.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
73,
Gwen, NG3P


On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 11:59 AM Bill NF6R <nf6r.bill@...> wrote:
Another way is to tie a small weights (nuts, washers, roll of electrical tape) to a string and throw it across the area.  Don't use anything that you can't afford to lose (car keys, wedding band).  Works well in a drop ceiling.
--

Bill - NF6R
SKCC 20696 NAQCC 9984 LICWC 690 FISTS 19479 CalQRP 78 Flying Pigs 4181


Michael N6MST
 

On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 11:31 AM, Gwen Patton wrote:
I got a cheap RC tank from Radio Shack
True ham spirit right there. I love it!


kevin asato
 

i ran RG-59 through 1" pex and had to be careful. The coax jacket and the pex have an affinity for each other and things tended to bind even while gently _pulling_ the coax through. Lube was not an option as i did not want to think about the long term affects of whatever lube on the coax jacket or the pex. Just my observation.
73,
kevin
kc6pob

On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 7:43 AM KI7MWA via groups.io <entilleser=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
This question comes from out in Left Field...but I couldn't think of a better place to start an inquiry...

I need to run my coax feed line through a mess of plumbing/wiring/metal studs/etc.  There is no straight shot through, so rigid conduit is out.  Standard flex conduit is a pain in the *ss.  I was thinking about using pex-al-pex.  Do I need the extra shielding?  Would standard pex be just fine?  

Thoughts?  Other options?  Forget the whole thing?


ajparent1/KB1GMX
 

Last time I had to pull a cable through tube I used a vacuum to suck
some string with a small wad of rag though then turned a tougher
cord to that an used that to pull the cable.

Hint DO NOT USE PVC jacketed cable as it contaminates over time
and grabs while pulling (must use lube or soap).  Look for a Polyethylene
jacket as its tough, non contaminating, and slippery.

IF you do the above the standard pex is fine but the diameter must be
large enough to easily allow the bend radius of the cable.

Allison
-------------------------------
Please reply on list so we can share.
No private email, it goes to a bit bucket due address harvesting


Wes AE6ZM
 

I see we do not have any electricians here. LOL! First, you will not be able to push either cable or conduit, you will need to pull it. The effort to place a flexible conduit is the same as just placing the cable. Any places the run changes direction you will need to have physical access to that point, cable or conduit. 
If you know a qualified electrician tap into his experience. Ask him/her to look at your route and give suggestions.
Someone will argue with me, but this perspective comes from 40 years of industrial electrcal work.
--
> I finally got it all together...now I can't remember where I put it<

VY 73,
Wes

AE6ZM

Sierra Vista, AZ

 


Al Gritzmacher AE2T
 

I knew a guy who used a small crossbow to shoot a string through crowded areas. Mostly above ceilings.

Not really recommending it, though.


Ted 2E0THH
 

Back in Cumberland (when it was still called that) in the UK during the 60s, I knew an electrician that employed his pet trained hamster to run wire pull strings under floorboards.

73s Ted
2E0THH

 


Ian VK3LA
 

When installing Quad shield coax for Pay TV in brick walls behind plaster sheets and studs/noggins, we typically used the semi rigid spline (5mm x 15mm plastic) from sheet flooring to push or pull the coax into place. (The spline was used to supply a tongue as would tongue and groove joints between the sheets of Chip/particle board flooring). A small hole drilled near the end could be used to attach the rigid core of the CoAx with a turn or two of tape  to protect the outer, it holds a bend but remains flexible overall in one direction only.
Ian VK3LA


Wes KN4NPH
 

When I worked for Florida's Dept. of Transportation, we wrapped/tied a wad of tissue to a light-weight string, at one end of a conduit. A ShopVac at the other end easily sucked the string through the conduit. Then, lots of wire-pulling gel, and we could pull a LOT of wires/cables. We always attached a second string to any cables or wires we pulled, for the next time.
  There was one installation where we blew the tissue/string through the conduit, so you have two options with this method.

Ahhh! Those were the days.


On Sat, Jul 11, 2020 at 2:15 AM Ian VK3LA <vk3la@...> wrote:
When installing Quad shield coax for Pay TV in brick walls behind plaster sheets and studs/noggins, we typically used the semi rigid spline (5mm x 15mm plastic) from sheet flooring to push or pull the coax into place. (The spline was used to supply a tongue as would tongue and groove joints between the sheets of Chip/particle board flooring). A small hole drilled near the end could be used to attach the rigid core of the CoAx with a turn or two of tape  to protect the outer, it holds a bend but remains flexible overall in one direction only.
Ian VK3LA