CW


David Wilcox K8WPE
 

Julian,

If my wife is not downstairs near the shack I leave a rig on in the background (sadly she has excellent hearing and can hear through the floor and through two closed doors. I have a device like TV Ears that I can hook up to a rig and hear CW through my Bluetooth hearing aids). Surprising how well the brain picks out words from a string of even high speed code. If I wasn’t married I would have a CW radio on in the background even upstairs and sometimes do when Bev is out for the day. I am no speed demon but have fun at 12 - 15 WPM and can copy faster if the sender is good.

I also use an Ap called Ham Morse ($5.00) on my iPhone that sends the daily news to my hearing aids from 20 or more daily newspapers. Try it. You can use ear buds and listen to CW at any speed w and w/o Farnsworth from your iPhone any time, any place.

I may have mentioned it but the Morserino 32 is a fantastic learning machine too.

FWIW,

Dave K8WPE

David J. Wilcox K8WPE’s iPad


David J. Wilcox K8WPE’s iPad


 

Hi Dave,

I agree totally that having a CW "environment" is good for learning: I do it as often as I can - often for a couple of hour a day. I got some flack from an old timer who insisted (quite assertively!) that I could never learn CW listening to it while doing something else, but I find that it is helpful to me. As I have ADD, or something like it, it is extremely difficult - nigh impossible - to sit down and "just" focus on just one thing: my mind wanders all over the place, looking for something else to think about. If I have a low-focus task to do (like cooking, washing dishes, or watering the planters around the patio) then I can do those things in the background and then try to bring the CW to the foreground and hold it there. Doing it that way tells me instantly if a character will come instantly (which they all must, eventually) or if I have to think about it, thus requiring extra focus on that character. And you're right, when listening "environmentally", the brain just starts picking out characters and words naturally. So I'm not only learning to copy CW, I'm also learning to focus - all without stress and frustration, which always wrecks learning for me .

To help with this, I have a set of "Trekz Aftershokz Titanium Bone Conduction Open Ear Headphones" - what I call "bone phones", which are headphones which go over the head, as normal, but the drivers sit on the cheek bones in front of the ear, not over the ear. That way I am fully connected to my environment and can hear the wife if she suddenly decides to talk to me from the other room - for safety (in both cases)  - and the CW (or music or whatever) is just "there". If and when my mind quiets down, I can sit down and focus.

For software I use several tools that run on the PC and/or my mobile phone. On the latter my favorite is CW Morse Trainer by some outfit called "Wolphi LLC". It's my favorite because I can switch quickly between random groups with and without Koch, call signs, qso text,English words, my own text, or eBook - all of them with Farnsworth spacing. I've used a couple of others, but the great thing is with this app that I can set it up to repeat any number of groups or any number of words, and it'll run for ages, which is really nice if my hands are wet or dirty. The one thing that is missing is repeating each English word a couple of times, which would make it almost perfect.

I'll check out Ham Morse, because as we all know, words are linked together to make sentences, and contextually relevant material from outside sources would be good training for rag-chewing.

Thanks for your input!

Julian N4JO.

On 6/27/2020 1:34 PM, David wrote:
Julian,

If my wife is not downstairs near the shack I leave a rig on in the background (sadly she has excellent hearing and can hear through the floor and through two closed doors. I have a device like TV Ears that I can hook up to a rig and hear CW through my Bluetooth hearing aids). Surprising how well the brain picks out words from a string of even high speed code. If I wasn’t married I would have a CW radio on in the background even upstairs and sometimes do when Bev is out for the day. I am no speed demon but have fun at 12 - 15 WPM and can copy faster if the sender is good.

I also use an Ap called Ham Morse ($5.00) on my iPhone that sends the daily news to my hearing aids from 20 or more daily newspapers. Try it. You can use ear buds and listen to CW at any speed w and w/o Farnsworth from your iPhone any time, any place.

I may have mentioned it but the Morserino 32 is a fantastic learning machine too.

FWIW,

Dave K8WPE

David J. Wilcox K8WPE’s iPad


Paul Harrison
 

By the way, a cw tip, try sending and receiving in the Spanish language, as it's the most balanced language for cw, also if you do not know Spanish it has the advantage that you don't anticipate the word before it's completed. This method was used 50 years ago to teach professionals.

Paul DJ0CU.


James Daldry W4JED
 

Hi, Julian

I do most of my cw practice with my phone, since I, along with most of the male half of the world, have a wife that's "cw sensitive". I put the buds in and head out for a 3 mile walk.

I use 2 pieces of software that run on my Android. The first is the Wolphi CW Trainer, which simulates ham contacts with ages, names, random call signs, random antenna heights and lengths, random equipment model numbers, etc. If you are watching the screen it plays the letter audio then immediately shows the letter or number.

The other is my audio player app and the K7QO code course. The fun part is that once you are done with the beginning section, learning the letters, numbers, and punctuation, you are treated to Jules Verne's "War of the Worlds" in CW, starting at about 10 WPM and ending at 25 WPM. Normally when you read a piece of fiction you occasionally skip over words or phrases. Not so with this. It's probably the most "fine grained" way to "read" a book.

If you have something you can run Linux on there is a program called "ebook2cw" that will generate a stack of MP3 or Ogg Vorbis files from the text of an ebook, one file per chapter. That way you can listen to a story from the last century, rather than the century before it.

73

Jim W4JED

On 6/27/20 6:55 PM, Julian Opificius wrote:
Hi Dave,

I agree totally that having a CW "environment" is good for learning: I do it as often as I can - often for a couple of hour a day. I got some flack from an old timer who insisted (quite assertively!) that I could never learn CW listening to it while doing something else, but I find that it is helpful to me. As I have ADD, or something like it, it is extremely difficult - nigh impossible - to sit down and "just" focus on just one thing: my mind wanders all over the place, looking for something else to think about. If I have a low-focus task to do (like cooking, washing dishes, or watering the planters around the patio) then I can do those things in the background and then try to bring the CW to the foreground and hold it there. Doing it that way tells me instantly if a character will come instantly (which they all must, eventually) or if I have to think about it, thus requiring extra focus on that character. And you're right, when listening "environmentally", the brain just starts picking out characters and words naturally. So I'm not only learning to copy CW, I'm also learning to focus - all without stress and frustration, which always wrecks learning for me .

To help with this, I have a set of "Trekz Aftershokz Titanium Bone Conduction Open Ear Headphones" - what I call "bone phones", which are headphones which go over the head, as normal, but the drivers sit on the cheek bones in front of the ear, not over the ear. That way I am fully connected to my environment and can hear the wife if she suddenly decides to talk to me from the other room - for safety (in both cases)  - and the CW (or music or whatever) is just "there". If and when my mind quiets down, I can sit down and focus.

For software I use several tools that run on the PC and/or my mobile phone. On the latter my favorite is CW Morse Trainer by some outfit called "Wolphi LLC". It's my favorite because I can switch quickly between random groups with and without Koch, call signs, qso text,English words, my own text, or eBook - all of them with Farnsworth spacing. I've used a couple of others, but the great thing is with this app that I can set it up to repeat any number of groups or any number of words, and it'll run for ages, which is really nice if my hands are wet or dirty. The one thing that is missing is repeating each English word a couple of times, which would make it almost perfect.

I'll check out Ham Morse, because as we all know, words are linked together to make sentences, and contextually relevant material from outside sources would be good training for rag-chewing.

Thanks for your input!

Julian N4JO.

On 6/27/2020 1:34 PM, David wrote:
Julian,

If my wife is not downstairs near the shack I leave a rig on in the background (sadly she has excellent hearing and can hear through the floor and through two closed doors.  I have a device like TV Ears that I can hook up to a rig and hear CW through my Bluetooth hearing aids).  Surprising how well the brain picks out words from a string of even high speed code.  If I wasn’t married I would have a CW radio on in the background even upstairs and sometimes do when Bev is out for the day.  I am no speed demon but have fun at 12 - 15 WPM and can copy faster if the sender is good.

I also use an Ap called Ham Morse ($5.00) on my iPhone that sends the daily news to my hearing aids from 20 or more daily newspapers.  Try it.  You can use ear buds and listen to CW at any speed w and w/o Farnsworth from your iPhone any time, any place.

I may have mentioned it but the Morserino 32 is a fantastic learning machine too.

FWIW,

Dave K8WPE

David J. Wilcox K8WPE’s iPad


 

Thanks for that info, Jim!

Yes, as  Isaid, I use the Wolphi app because of the features you enumerated. I will check out the others - yes I use Linux.

Thanks!

Julian N4JO.

On 6/28/2020 9:23 AM, James Daldry W4JED wrote:
Hi, Julian

I do most of my cw practice with my phone, since I, along with most of the male half of the world, have a wife that's "cw sensitive". I put the buds in and head out for a 3 mile walk.

I use 2 pieces of software that run on my Android. The first is the Wolphi CW Trainer, which simulates ham contacts with ages, names, random call signs, random antenna heights and lengths, random equipment model numbers, etc. If you are watching the screen it plays the letter audio then immediately shows the letter or number.

The other is my audio player app and the K7QO code course. The fun part is that once you are done with the beginning section, learning the letters, numbers, and punctuation, you are treated to Jules Verne's "War of the Worlds" in CW, starting at about 10 WPM and ending at 25 WPM. Normally when you read a piece of fiction you occasionally skip over words or phrases. Not so with this. It's probably the most "fine grained" way to "read" a book.

If you have something you can run Linux on there is a program called "ebook2cw" that will generate a stack of MP3 or Ogg Vorbis files from the text of an ebook, one file per chapter. That way you can listen to a story from the last century, rather than the century before it.

73

Jim W4JED

On 6/27/20 6:55 PM, Julian Opificius wrote:
Hi Dave,

I agree totally that having a CW "environment" is good for learning: I do it as often as I can - often for a couple of hour a day. I got some flack from an old timer who insisted (quite assertively!) that I could never learn CW listening to it while doing something else, but I find that it is helpful to me. As I have ADD, or something like it, it is extremely difficult - nigh impossible - to sit down and "just" focus on just one thing: my mind wanders all over the place, looking for something else to think about. If I have a low-focus task to do (like cooking, washing dishes, or watering the planters around the patio) then I can do those things in the background and then try to bring the CW to the foreground and hold it there. Doing it that way tells me instantly if a character will come instantly (which they all must, eventually) or if I have to think about it, thus requiring extra focus on that character. And you're right, when listening "environmentally", the brain just starts picking out characters and words naturally. So I'm not only learning to copy CW, I'm also learning to focus - all without stress and frustration, which always wrecks learning for me .

To help with this, I have a set of "Trekz Aftershokz Titanium Bone Conduction Open Ear Headphones" - what I call "bone phones", which are headphones which go over the head, as normal, but the drivers sit on the cheek bones in front of the ear, not over the ear. That way I am fully connected to my environment and can hear the wife if she suddenly decides to talk to me from the other room - for safety (in both cases)  - and the CW (or music or whatever) is just "there". If and when my mind quiets down, I can sit down and focus.

For software I use several tools that run on the PC and/or my mobile phone. On the latter my favorite is CW Morse Trainer by some outfit called "Wolphi LLC". It's my favorite because I can switch quickly between random groups with and without Koch, call signs, qso text,English words, my own text, or eBook - all of them with Farnsworth spacing. I've used a couple of others, but the great thing is with this app that I can set it up to repeat any number of groups or any number of words, and it'll run for ages, which is really nice if my hands are wet or dirty. The one thing that is missing is repeating each English word a couple of times, which would make it almost perfect.

I'll check out Ham Morse, because as we all know, words are linked together to make sentences, and contextually relevant material from outside sources would be good training for rag-chewing.

Thanks for your input!

Julian N4JO.

On 6/27/2020 1:34 PM, David wrote:
Julian,

If my wife is not downstairs near the shack I leave a rig on in the background (sadly she has excellent hearing and can hear through the floor and through two closed doors.  I have a device like TV Ears that I can hook up to a rig and hear CW through my Bluetooth hearing aids).  Surprising how well the brain picks out words from a string of even high speed code. If I wasn’t married I would have a CW radio on in the background even upstairs and sometimes do when Bev is out for the day.  I am no speed demon but have fun at 12 - 15 WPM and can copy faster if the sender is good.

I also use an Ap called Ham Morse ($5.00) on my iPhone that sends the daily news to my hearing aids from 20 or more daily newspapers.  Try it.  You can use ear buds and listen to CW at any speed w and w/o Farnsworth from your iPhone any time, any place.

I may have mentioned it but the Morserino 32 is a fantastic learning machine too.

FWIW,

Dave K8WPE

David J. Wilcox K8WPE’s iPad


 

That's an interesting idea, Paul.

The written Spanish language places an inverted question mark at the beginning of a sentence, so you know the sentence will be in interrogative form; is there any equivalent when translated to Morse? Seems to me that wouldn't be a bad idea, for the same reason.

Julian.

On 6/28/2020 8:42 AM, Paul Harrison via groups.io wrote:
By the way, a cw tip, try sending and receiving in the Spanish language, as it's the most balanced language for cw, also if you do not know Spanish it has the advantage that you don't anticipate the word before it's completed. This method was used 50 years ago to teach professionals.

Paul DJ0CU.


lajes67
 

Great question and yes there is a good answer.
I was a Navy Radioman back in the 60's, the Navy way to ask a question is preceded with  Interrogative, like if someone is blasting their stereo instead of saying "are you deaf?" you could say "interrogative deaf", of course on CW if you wanted to know someone's QTH you would send "INT QTH"
Amateur Radio does it different, "QTH IMI", IMI being question mark, one of the main reasons when I send my call sign on CW I add an extra space between I and Z, I just finished Field Day and if a station didn't get my call and I heard K2? I knew they were looking for me,

Hope that answers your question.

73 John K2IZ 


Daniel Walter
 

I believe most punctuation is present in English as well as other languages, but other than the few common ones, virtually none are used in Amateur Radio.
--
73, Dan  NM3A


Shirley Dulcey KE1L
 

That may be. But the question mark is one of the punctuation marks that is in common use in ham radio along with comma and period, and our own ham-specific BT which doesn't exactly map to any of the standard ones. Anything else I'd have to look up; there are probably Morse characters for colon, semicolon, quotation marks, and so forth, but I don't know what they are and I doubt that anybody who isn't a CW traffic handler does.


On Sun, Jun 28, 2020 at 5:55 PM Daniel Walter via groups.io <nm3a=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I believe most punctuation is present in English as well as other languages, but other than the few common ones, virtually none are used in Amateur Radio.
--
73, Dan  NM3A


DK
 

How did you get  the K7QO code course on your phone? I see from Chuck’s website that it is an iso file which I think is for burning a CD. How did you extract the mp3 files ( I assume they are MP3’s)?

DK 
KD6TK 

On Jun 28, 2020, at 12:27 PM, lajes67 <jsmale859@...> wrote:

Great question and yes there is a good answer.
I was a Navy Radioman back in the 60's, the Navy way to ask a question is preceded with  Interrogative, like if someone is blasting their stereo instead of saying "are you deaf?" you could say "interrogative deaf", of course on CW if you wanted to know someone's QTH you would send "INT QTH"
Amateur Radio does it different, "QTH IMI", IMI being question mark, one of the main reasons when I send my call sign on CW I add an extra space between I and Z, I just finished Field Day and if a station didn't get my call and I heard K2? I knew they were looking for me,

Hope that answers your question.

73 John K2IZ 


Jim Manley
 

Here's the Morse for punctuation, Shirley, with my own dopey mnemonics:

' .----.  (WG Widdew Grave mark)
! -.-.--  (CM Cmon, Man!)
/ -..-.   (NR Not Right angle)
( -.--.   (KN start pareNtheses)
) -.--.-  (KK Kill parentheses)
& .=...   (AS AmperSand)
: ---...  (OS Official Subject:)
; -.-.-.  (CN Colon Not)
= -...-   (BT BeTween sides of equations - same as BREAK)
+ .-.-.   (RN Registered Nurse is my plus-one)
- -....-  (NV NegatiVe)
" .-..-.  (RR quoth the Raven neveRmore)
$ ...-..- (SX SeX co$tS money)
@ .--.-.  (ATR AT maRk)

Ye Olde Traffic Handler, USN
Jim  KJ7JHE
Lame Deer Montana High School Amateur Radio Club

... and don't call _me_ Shirley! :D


On Sun, Jun 28, 2020 at 4:20 PM Shirley Dulcey KE1L <mark@...> wrote:
That may be. But the question mark is one of the punctuation marks that is in common use in ham radio along with comma and period, and our own ham-specific BT which doesn't exactly map to any of the standard ones. Anything else I'd have to look up; there are probably Morse characters for colon, semicolon, quotation marks, and so forth, but I don't know what they are and I doubt that anybody who isn't a CW traffic handler does.


lajes67
 

I wish they still had the "press" broadcasts, I did fine on the news but messed up on the sports scores because I was reading them as soon as I typed them

73 John K2IZ (RM3) another Olde Traffic Handler USN '65-'69


Steve in Okinawa
 

My pet peeve for today only: the period .-.-.- is rarely needed in everyday ragchewing (vs. message handling). Most often a pause -...- suffices and is faster.  Why do many ops use the full-blown comma --..-- as if they are writing a letter or a poem? It never increases comprehension and just slows things down.  Just a peeve (,) as I said. 


jjpurdum
 

I think some operators use punctuation as a pause to collect what they're going to say next...they want that momentary slow down, but also want you to know they are still there.

Jack, W8TEE

On Sunday, June 28, 2020, 10:04:39 PM EDT, Steve in Okinawa <sfab43@...> wrote:


My pet peeve for today only: the period .-.-.- is rarely needed in everyday ragchewing (vs. message handling). Most often a pause -...- suffices and is faster.  Why do many ops use the full-blown comma --..-- as if they are writing a letter or a poem? It never increases comprehension and just slows things down.  Just a peeve (,) as I said. 


David Wilcox K8WPE
 

Steve,

Because they are retired persons used to dictation.  I add “comma”, “period”, and “question mark” to my messages that I leave on other folks answering machines.  I catch myself and apologize after doing it but being retired five years I still can’t break the habit. Ha!

Dave K8WPE

PS. Will append a for sale list.  No swaps this summer and have a list of stuff I want to sell.  Hope you don’t mind.



David J. Wilcox K8WPE’s iPad

On Jun 28, 2020, at 10:04 PM, Steve in Okinawa <sfab43@...> wrote:

My pet peeve for today only: the period .-.-.- is rarely needed in everyday ragchewing (vs. message handling). Most often a pause -...- suffices and is faster.  Why do many ops use the full-blown comma --..-- as if they are writing a letter or a poem? It never increases comprehension and just slows things down.  Just a peeve (,) as I said. 


Dave Spicer
 

I can remember clearly,  in early days of training, sending “IMI AA ..............”

On Sunday, June 28, 2020, 20:27, lajes67 <jsmale859@...> wrote:

Great question and yes there is a good answer.
I was a Navy Radioman back in the 60's, the Navy way to ask a question is preceded with  Interrogative, like if someone is blasting their stereo instead of saying "are you deaf?" you could say "interrogative deaf", of course on CW if you wanted to know someone's QTH you would send "INT QTH"
Amateur Radio does it different, "QTH IMI", IMI being question mark, one of the main reasons when I send my call sign on CW I add an extra space between I and Z, I just finished Field Day and if a station didn't get my call and I heard K2? I knew they were looking for me,

Hope that answers your question.

73 John K2IZ 


Dave Spicer
 


Why on earth did I send the email below. I was reading the email about INT, so where my reply came from I don’t know.

On Monday, June 29, 2020, 11:09, Dave Spicer via groups.io <david.spicer5@...> wrote:

I can remember clearly,  in early days of training, sending “IMI AA ..............”

73 Dave G1ORK 


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Sunday, June 28, 2020, 20:27, lajes67 <jsmale859@...> wrote:

Great question and yes there is a good answer.
I was a Navy Radioman back in the 60's, the Navy way to ask a question is preceded with  Interrogative, like if someone is blasting their stereo instead of saying "are you deaf?" you could say "interrogative deaf", of course on CW if you wanted to know someone's QTH you would send "INT QTH"
Amateur Radio does it different, "QTH IMI", IMI being question mark, one of the main reasons when I send my call sign on CW I add an extra space between I and Z, I just finished Field Day and if a station didn't get my call and I heard K2? I knew they were looking for me,

Hope that answers your question.

73 John K2IZ 


John Rabson
 

I found NAVAREA warnings from WCC on 13034 good practice.

John F5VLF

On 29 Jun 2020, at 03:40, lajes67 <jsmale859@...> wrote:

I wish they still had the "press" broadcasts, I did fine on the news but messed up on the sports scores because I was reading them as soon as I typed them

73 John K2IZ (RM3) another Olde Traffic Handler USN '65-'69


James Daldry W4JED
 

Hi, DK

A quick Google of "rip music cd" and "mount iso file" will find you the tools and instructions for making mp3's out of an audio cd without burning the cd. Since the last time I ripped a cd under Windows (XP) was in the early 2000's I can't give instructions off the top of my head. I've run Linux exclusively on my pc's since early 2007, since PCLinuxOS was able to produce a live cd that installed the Atheros wifi driver, set up WPA, and ran the Beryl compositor from the live cd - no installation necessary. Beryl was the original compositor with the spinning cube, wobbly windows, and windows catching fire when you close them. Fun.

73

Jim W4JED

On 6/28/20 7:59 PM, DK wrote:
How did you get  the K7QO code course on your phone? I see from Chuck’s website that it is an iso file which I think is for burning a CD. How did you extract the mp3 files ( I assume they are MP3’s)?

DK 
KD6TK 

On Jun 28, 2020, at 12:27 PM, lajes67 <jsmale859@...> wrote:

Great question and yes there is a good answer.
I was a Navy Radioman back in the 60's, the Navy way to ask a question is preceded with  Interrogative, like if someone is blasting their stereo instead of saying "are you deaf?" you could say "interrogative deaf", of course on CW if you wanted to know someone's QTH you would send "INT QTH"
Amateur Radio does it different, "QTH IMI", IMI being question mark, one of the main reasons when I send my call sign on CW I add an extra space between I and Z, I just finished Field Day and if a station didn't get my call and I heard K2? I knew they were looking for me,

Hope that answers your question.

73 John K2IZ 


R. Tyson
 

I don't remember it being mentioned on here, but it may well have been at some time.

Practice code sessions are available here....

         http://www.arrl.org/10-wpm-code-archive

Look at the left side of that page and you will see that CW practice sessions are available in several speeds. These have been made available by the ARRL. There is plenty of material on there at whatever speed you want to try for and you can listen online or download the files. It is very good material for learning to decode in your head - but....

The CW sessions are all very well sent. Once you are copying at a reasonable speed then spend time listening to QSO's on the air. Only by listening to live QSO's can you get used to noise, fading and bad keying. It is much easier to copy properly spaced and evenly sent CW than the CW that is quite often heard on the air. Learning solely from practice material produced by the likes of the ARRL won't prepare you for the real world, it is ideal for initial learning though as it is good quality CW. Aim for learning at 20wpm. It won't be easy to start with, don't write it down learn to copy in your head. When able to pick out some words then give yourself a break and drop to around 15wpm just to feel that you are achieving something, but do your normal practice at 20 - 25wpm. The speed at 20 - 25 wpm means that you have to get used to the sound of the morse character, going a lot slower allows you to mentally count dots and dashes and that is a bad trap to fall into. When you try to up the speed from learning at a slow speed then you very nearly have to learn all over again as you are attempting to work out the individual dots and dashes and there is no time to do it..... and then you find you have to learn the sound of the character being sent.

Reg              G4NFR