favorite DVMs


Jim - W7EZN
 

What are your favorite DVM's in the $50 - $75 range.  I have a cheapo analog and am thinking about a decent upgrade.  Maybe with a component tester on board?
--
Jim, W7EZN    73!


Al Sines
 

Jim,

If you can afford it a Fluke meter will last you a lifetime. I have two Fluke meters. One is 40 years old and the other about 5. Never any trouble. 

FWIW

73, Alan W3AL


On Apr 5, 2020, at 11:46, Jim - W7EZN via groups.io <jhowell39@...> wrote:

What are your favorite DVM's in the $50 - $75 range.  I have a cheapo analog and am thinking about a decent upgrade.  Maybe with a component tester on board?
--
Jim, W7EZN    73!


Jim Mcilroy
 

I wouldn't use the word favourite. Bought this one on a whim. I don't use the wireless feature much but it can be handy on occasions when I'm working on PCBs

http://www.mastech-group.com/products.php?cate=93&PNo=248#_

73

Jim

On 05/04/2020 17:19, Al Sines wrote:
Jim,

If you can afford it a Fluke meter will last you a lifetime. I have two Fluke meters. One is 40 years old and the other about 5. Never any trouble. 

FWIW

73, Alan W3AL


On Apr 5, 2020, at 11:46, Jim - W7EZN via groups.io <jhowell39@...> wrote:

What are your favorite DVM's in the $50 - $75 range.  I have a cheapo analog and am thinking about a decent upgrade.  Maybe with a component tester on board?
--
Jim, W7EZN    73!


Evan Hand
 

I have a Fluke and would agree that they are good meters.  At the same time, I bought low cost meter from Amazon for $22.99 that has done well for portable use (My Fluke is currently limited to benchtop duty because of size and the NiCads have failed).

Here is the link:
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B01NAVAT9S/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

FWIW
73
Evan
AC9TU


Brien Pepperdine <brianpepperdine@...>
 

Probably about the mid-90s someone on QRP-L recommended a Radio Shack / Micronta meter.. RS 22-175A. I waited until RS had it on sale and bought one. That thing has helped build many many kits.. testing component values.

And it built my second story home addition.. testing all the new wiring I put in.. receptacles, lights.. continuity etc. Never failed, fell off the step-ladder more times than I would like to admit. 

The batteries seemed to last forever too, so I guess it is low draw on current.

Its an oldie.. but as it does it all and has continuity (good for checking for shorts in my soldering and traces) its been great value.

I have a Fluke too, and some B&K meter, and others. But the RS is the setting on or next to the bench at all times.

Brian VE3VAW Toronto ON


Charles Mims <chmims@...>
 

I have a Fluke 106 I have been happy with.  However it is about $80 on Amazon and no component tester.

Charles


On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 10:45 AM Jim - W7EZN via groups.io <jhowell39=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
What are your favorite DVM's in the $50 - $75 range.  I have a cheapo analog and am thinking about a decent upgrade.  Maybe with a component tester on board?
--
Jim, W7EZN    73!


Bill Cromwell
 

Hi,

I have a couple of inexpensive ($15) DVMs with some 'test' features. They do plenty well enough for my amateur work. I don't work in a nuclear lab nor at NIST. I also have a couple of old fashioned V-O-Ms, two VTVMs, and an FETVM. Somehow there is often no meter close to hand when I want one in a hurry.

73,

Bill KU8H

On 4/5/20 1:45 PM, Charles Mims wrote:
I have a Fluke 106 I have been happy with.  However it is about $80 on Amazon and no component tester.
Charles
On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 10:45 AM Jim - W7EZN via groups.io <http://groups.io> <jhowell39=yahoo.com@groups.io <mailto:yahoo.com@groups.io>> wrote:
What are your favorite DVM's in the $50 - $75 range.  I have a
cheapo analog and am thinking about a decent upgrade.  Maybe with a
component tester on board?
--
Jim, W7EZN    73!
--
bark less - wag more


Mike
 

Fluke 77 and Aneng AN8009, Fluke on bench, Aneng in pocket
The Aneag is only about £20 and measures far more things than I could ever
want. The Fluke is ex-military ( marked E.P Labs ) purchased for £35 iirc.
with valid certificate of calibration at the time.

On 5 Apr 2020 at 8:45, Jim - W7EZN via groups.io wrote:

What are your favorite DVM's in the $50 - $75 range.  I have a cheapo analog
and am thinking about a decent upgrade.  Maybe with a component tester on
board?
--
Jim, W7EZN    73!




 

I bought an Extech EX330 based on the this eevblog shoot out a few years ago, been extremely happy with it. Upgraded to probe-tech leads
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoeUgMFLyAw&ab_channel=EEVblog

For the bench bought a HP 3478A on eBay, absolutely fabulous. If you are patient you can get them for a bargain. Watch out for ones with dead batteries, as the calibration is lost if the battery dies, and re-calibration will cost you more than the meter itself. So look for a unit with good battery and then for insurance replace with fresh battery. Battery replacement is tricky, google for procedure.

73 de k1jbd
bammi


Gwen Patton
 

I managed to pick up a Fluke 27FM military surplus DVM. It's an amazing piece of gear. I paid about $85, plus shipping. There's one available right now for less than that.


I have an Aneng Q1 as a backup. It's quite nice for about $30 from Banggood.


73, 
Gwen, NG3P

On Sun, Apr 5, 2020, 2:01 PM Mike <mike@...> wrote:
Fluke 77 and Aneng AN8009, Fluke on bench, Aneng in pocket
The Aneag is only about £20 and measures far more things than I could ever
want. The Fluke is ex-military ( marked E.P Labs ) purchased for £35 iirc.
with valid certificate of calibration at the time.


On 5 Apr 2020 at 8:45, Jim - W7EZN via groups.io wrote:

> What are your favorite DVM's in the $50 - $75 range.  I have a cheapo analog
> and am thinking about a decent upgrade.  Maybe with a component tester on
> board?
> --
> Jim, W7EZN    73!
>
>
>
>






Stanly Witherspoon
 

This topic comes up enough on the EEVblog forums that there is a sticky on the info. There are a lot of junk DMMs.  If you are just doing low voltage(<48 V)they should be OK, but be aware of accuracy, noise and RF susceptibility. The issues start showing up in how they fail at higher voltages, such as wall AC, especially if you have them in the wrong mode. Some of the cheaper ones have done a RUD  (aerospace term: Rapid Unscheduled Disassembly:-)

Stan W AI6NF

On Apr 5, 2020, at 9:44 AM, Brien Pepperdine <brianpepperdine@...> wrote:



Probably about the mid-90s someone on QRP-L recommended a Radio Shack / Micronta meter.. RS 22-175A. I waited until RS had it on sale and bought one. That thing has helped build many many kits.. testing component values.

And it built my second story home addition.. testing all the new wiring I put in.. receptacles, lights.. continuity etc. Never failed, fell off the step-ladder more times than I would like to admit. 

The batteries seemed to last forever too, so I guess it is low draw on current.

Its an oldie.. but as it does it all and has continuity (good for checking for shorts in my soldering and traces) its been great value.

I have a Fluke too, and some B&K meter, and others. But the RS is the setting on or next to the bench at all times.

Brian VE3VAW Toronto ON


Hans Summers
 

Errr... I hardly am sure that I want to admit that I do all my work and play with one if the once-upon-a-time ubiquitous yellow DVMs costing around $3... which is now more than 15 years old and still going strong. I'm happy! 

The only thing I wish was different is some kind if auto-power-off for when I forget... because it is *really* annoying when you forget to switch it off on a Friday afternoon and come Monday morning when you notice it, the battery is nearly flat. A good 9V PP3 alkaline costs more than the meter did :-D

73 Hans G0UPL 

On Sun, Apr 5, 2020, 22:14 Stanly Witherspoon <stanw@...> wrote:
This topic comes up enough on the EEVblog forums that there is a sticky on the info. There are a lot of junk DMMs.  If you are just doing low voltage(<48 V)they should be OK, but be aware of accuracy, noise and RF susceptibility. The issues start showing up in how they fail at higher voltages, such as wall AC, especially if you have them in the wrong mode. Some of the cheaper ones have done a RUD  (aerospace term: Rapid Unscheduled Disassembly:-)

Stan W AI6NF

On Apr 5, 2020, at 9:44 AM, Brien Pepperdine <brianpepperdine@...> wrote:



Probably about the mid-90s someone on QRP-L recommended a Radio Shack / Micronta meter.. RS 22-175A. I waited until RS had it on sale and bought one. That thing has helped build many many kits.. testing component values.

And it built my second story home addition.. testing all the new wiring I put in.. receptacles, lights.. continuity etc. Never failed, fell off the step-ladder more times than I would like to admit. 

The batteries seemed to last forever too, so I guess it is low draw on current.

Its an oldie.. but as it does it all and has continuity (good for checking for shorts in my soldering and traces) its been great value.

I have a Fluke too, and some B&K meter, and others. But the RS is the setting on or next to the bench at all times.

Brian VE3VAW Toronto ON


Gerald Ball
 

On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 12:22 PM, Hans Summers wrote:
Errr... I hardly am sure that I want to admit that I do all my work and play with one if the once-upon-a-time ubiquitous yellow DVMs costing around $3... which is now more than 15 years old and still going strong. I'm happy! 
 
The only thing I wish was different is some kind if auto-power-off for when I forget... because it is *really* annoying when you forget to switch it off on a Friday afternoon and come Monday morning when you notice it, the battery is nearly flat. A good 9V PP3 alkaline costs more than the meter did :-D
 
73 Hans G0UPL 

On Sun, Apr 5, 2020, 22:14 Stanly Witherspoon <stanw@...> wrote:
This topic comes up enough on the EEVblog forums that there is a sticky on the info. There are a lot of junk DMMs.  If you are just doing low voltage(<48 V)they should be OK, but be aware of accuracy, noise and RF susceptibility. The issues start showing up in how they fail at higher voltages, such as wall AC, especially if you have them in the wrong mode. Some of the cheaper ones have done a RUD  (aerospace term: Rapid Unscheduled Disassembly:-)

Stan W AI6NF

On Apr 5, 2020, at 9:44 AM, Brien Pepperdine <brianpepperdine@...> wrote:

Probably about the mid-90s someone on QRP-L recommended a Radio Shack / Micronta meter.. RS 22-175A. I waited until RS had it on sale and bought one. That thing has helped build many many kits.. testing component values.

And it built my second story home addition.. testing all the new wiring I put in.. receptacles, lights.. continuity etc. Never failed, fell off the step-ladder more times than I would like to admit. 

The batteries seemed to last forever too, so I guess it is low draw on current.

Its an oldie.. but as it does it all and has continuity (good for checking for shorts in my soldering and traces) its been great value.

I have a Fluke too, and some B&K meter, and others. But the RS is the setting on or next to the bench at all times.

Brian VE3VAW Toronto ON


Gerald Ball
 

Agree Hans

I have one of those little yellow DVM's. A CIRKIT TM 5315B. Many years of faithful service. I can relate to your relate to your frustration re the battery situation. Maybe about the time Taiwan became big in pp9 production!
I also sport a Fluke 77. A fine machine all wrapped up in a solid protective rubber sleeve.

73 Gerry G4OJF 


Eric KE6US
 

Same here. I have several for bench, garage and travel trailer. Never had a failure in about the same 15 years. I also have a more expensive Harbor Freight meter. It was <$50. I bought it because the numbers are bigger!  I don't need high traceable accuracy. I need repeatability. I check the meters against one another periodically. If one reads significantly differently from the others, I throw it away and save up for another $3 replacement.

Many years ago, I worked part-time in a radio-TV repair shop (yeah, those were a thing once upon a time). We had a tube tester for use by the public. We called it a tube seller. People would come in with a sack of tubes, buy a couple and within a few days, we'd get the TV into the shop.

I have about as much faith in the built-in component testers in an inexpensive meter. I have separate devices for that (AADE meter and DCA75 tester).

Eric KE6US

On 4/5/2020 12:22 PM, Hans Summers wrote:
Errr... I hardly am sure that I want to admit that I do all my work and play with one if the once-upon-a-time ubiquitous yellow DVMs costing around $3... which is now more than 15 years old and still going strong. I'm happy! 

The only thing I wish was different is some kind if auto-power-off for when I forget... because it is *really* annoying when you forget to switch it off on a Friday afternoon and come Monday morning when you notice it, the battery is nearly flat. A good 9V PP3 alkaline costs more than the meter did :-D

73 Hans G0UPL 

On Sun, Apr 5, 2020, 22:14 Stanly Witherspoon <stanw@...> wrote:
This topic comes up enough on the EEVblog forums that there is a sticky on the info. There are a lot of junk DMMs.  If you are just doing low voltage(<48 V)they should be OK, but be aware of accuracy, noise and RF susceptibility. The issues start showing up in how they fail at higher voltages, such as wall AC, especially if you have them in the wrong mode. Some of the cheaper ones have done a RUD  (aerospace term: Rapid Unscheduled Disassembly:-)

Stan W AI6NF

On Apr 5, 2020, at 9:44 AM, Brien Pepperdine <brianpepperdine@...> wrote:



Probably about the mid-90s someone on QRP-L recommended a Radio Shack / Micronta meter.. RS 22-175A. I waited until RS had it on sale and bought one. That thing has helped build many many kits.. testing component values.

And it built my second story home addition.. testing all the new wiring I put in.. receptacles, lights.. continuity etc. Never failed, fell off the step-ladder more times than I would like to admit. 

The batteries seemed to last forever too, so I guess it is low draw on current.

Its an oldie.. but as it does it all and has continuity (good for checking for shorts in my soldering and traces) its been great value.

I have a Fluke too, and some B&K meter, and others. But the RS is the setting on or next to the bench at all times.

Brian VE3VAW Toronto ON


robert tharp <rtharp0001@...>
 

Home Depot has a mid-grade meter from Commercial Electric that costs about $45. Had mine a year and it works great. 

Best of all, it includes the all-important Auto Off feature!

Robert   KR4VT

On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 3:42 PM Eric KE6US <eric.csuf@...> wrote:

Same here. I have several for bench, garage and travel trailer. Never had a failure in about the same 15 years. I also have a more expensive Harbor Freight meter. It was <$50. I bought it because the numbers are bigger!  I don't need high traceable accuracy. I need repeatability. I check the meters against one another periodically. If one reads significantly differently from the others, I throw it away and save up for another $3 replacement.

Many years ago, I worked part-time in a radio-TV repair shop (yeah, those were a thing once upon a time). We had a tube tester for use by the public. We called it a tube seller. People would come in with a sack of tubes, buy a couple and within a few days, we'd get the TV into the shop.

I have about as much faith in the built-in component testers in an inexpensive meter. I have separate devices for that (AADE meter and DCA75 tester).

Eric KE6US

On 4/5/2020 12:22 PM, Hans Summers wrote:
Errr... I hardly am sure that I want to admit that I do all my work and play with one if the once-upon-a-time ubiquitous yellow DVMs costing around $3... which is now more than 15 years old and still going strong. I'm happy! 

The only thing I wish was different is some kind if auto-power-off for when I forget... because it is *really* annoying when you forget to switch it off on a Friday afternoon and come Monday morning when you notice it, the battery is nearly flat. A good 9V PP3 alkaline costs more than the meter did :-D

73 Hans G0UPL 

On Sun, Apr 5, 2020, 22:14 Stanly Witherspoon <stanw@...> wrote:
This topic comes up enough on the EEVblog forums that there is a sticky on the info. There are a lot of junk DMMs.  If you are just doing low voltage(<48 V)they should be OK, but be aware of accuracy, noise and RF susceptibility. The issues start showing up in how they fail at higher voltages, such as wall AC, especially if you have them in the wrong mode. Some of the cheaper ones have done a RUD  (aerospace term: Rapid Unscheduled Disassembly:-)

Stan W AI6NF

On Apr 5, 2020, at 9:44 AM, Brien Pepperdine <brianpepperdine@...> wrote:



Probably about the mid-90s someone on QRP-L recommended a Radio Shack / Micronta meter.. RS 22-175A. I waited until RS had it on sale and bought one. That thing has helped build many many kits.. testing component values.

And it built my second story home addition.. testing all the new wiring I put in.. receptacles, lights.. continuity etc. Never failed, fell off the step-ladder more times than I would like to admit. 

The batteries seemed to last forever too, so I guess it is low draw on current.

Its an oldie.. but as it does it all and has continuity (good for checking for shorts in my soldering and traces) its been great value.

I have a Fluke too, and some B&K meter, and others. But the RS is the setting on or next to the bench at all times.

Brian VE3VAW Toronto ON


James Daldry W4JED
 

Hi, Bill

One of the places I worked had a Sencore FETVM, which was the only meter with a high voltage probe. If you didn't have the ground clip connected to the right place, and you tried to measure high voltage, the fets would instantly die. The meter gained the name "Sencorpse".

73

Jim W4JED

On 4/5/20 1:58 PM, Bill Cromwell wrote:
Hi,

I have a couple of inexpensive ($15) DVMs with some 'test' features. They do plenty well enough for my amateur work. I don't work in a nuclear lab nor at NIST. I also have a couple of old fashioned V-O-Ms, two VTVMs, and an FETVM. Somehow there is often no meter close to hand when I want one in a hurry.

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 4/5/20 1:45 PM, Charles Mims wrote:
I have a Fluke 106 I have been happy with.  However it is about $80 on Amazon and no component tester.

Charles

On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 10:45 AM Jim - W7EZN via groups.io <http://groups.io> <jhowell39=yahoo.com@groups.io <mailto:yahoo.com@groups.io>> wrote:

    What are your favorite DVM's in the $50 - $75 range.  I have a
    cheapo analog and am thinking about a decent upgrade.  Maybe with a
    component tester on board?
    --     Jim, W7EZN    73!


Andy Brilleaux <punkbiscuit@...>
 

On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 08:22 PM, Hans Summers wrote:
I hardly am sure that I want to admit that I do all my work and play with one if the once-upon-a-time ubiquitous yellow DVMs costing around $3.
They saw you coming Hans ! ;-)
I paid $1 for mine, and another similar one.

As Hans says, they are perfectly good as daily drivers,there really is no need for anything fancy when it comes to
everyday voltage / current measurements.

Also pays to have access to an analogue meter too. Something like a 10ms pulse from a GPS is easier to
sense than using a DMM. [Note sense, not actually measure due to response time].

Just for fun it's worth going to certain online magazine archives and looking at electronics mags from the 80's
for example and seeing the DMM's that were available then.

Utter crap for $100's.

These days, I'd expect the DMM to be gold plated, and come with a gift set of  El Presidente Cuban cigars for that price.

73 de Andy


Eric KE6US
 

I still use an analog meter to adjust dwell/duty cycle on the dot contacts of my bugs, though I retouch it by ear.

Eric KE6US

On 4/5/2020 2:39 PM, Andy Brilleaux via groups.io wrote:
Also pays to have access to an analogue meter too. Something like a 10ms pulse from a GPS is easier to
sense than using a DMM. [Note sense, not actually measure due to response time].

73 de Andy


fred.g3srf@...
 

I have to agree with most of the others, most times you only need an indication that the parameter you are checking is in the right ball park. I have a Beckmann DMM which has a good, positive feel to the rotary switch whereas my cheaper ones do not. If you don't have an analogue meter, look for one that has a bargraph but an analogue meter is better for looking for peaks or nulls. Don't bother with gimmicks such as capacitor or inductor ranges, they are not that good as are the frequency counter ranges. Better to get dedicated equipment for these.