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Quadrature modulation: The signal behind digital communications | EDN

SkipF, NT1G <skip.flem@...>
 

Eric KE6US
 

There was a recent question in, I think, QRP-Tech group (now on groups.io) asking what level of math is required to understand W7ZOI's Radio Frequency Design.

This article shows that much of it was covered in high school math (OK, what would be called AP Math today). That doesn't in any way detract from the level of math used by practicing engineers in some cases, but it shows that the level needed to understand and successfully homebrew some very interesting designs is well within the reach of most hams.

Thanks for posting the article.

Eric KE6US

Bill Cromwell
 

Hi Eric,

I don't have that book yet but I can get by if I take my shoes off so I can count on my toes as well as my fingers. The 'old' math.

73,

Bill KU8H

On 12/13/19 1:22 PM, Eric KE6US wrote:
There was a recent question in, I think, QRP-Tech group (now on groups.io) asking what level of math is required to understand W7ZOI's Radio Frequency Design.
This article shows that much of it was covered in high school math (OK, what would be called AP Math today). That doesn't in any way detract from the level of math used by practicing engineers in some cases, but it shows that the level needed to understand and successfully homebrew some very interesting designs is well within the reach of most hams.
Thanks for posting the article.
Eric KE6US
On 12/13/2019 9:17 AM, SkipF, NT1G wrote:
https://www.edn.com/electronics-blogs/fun-with-fundamentals/4462467/Quadrature-modulation--The-signal-behind-digital-communications
--
bark less - wag more

jjpurdum
 

Takes me back to when I was getting ready to go into the 9th grade. My home town was a small farming community and after the 8th grade, you and your parents went in to meet with the counselor to decide whether you were going to go into a pre-college or vocational track. The counselor asked what I wanted to do (I had my General class license). I told him I wanted to be an Electrical Engineer. He looked at me, then told my parents I wasn't smart enough to go to college and that I should plan on fixing farm equipment.

I can't even begin to relate the impact that had on me. On the plus side, my parents and I ran into him about 10 years later after I got my Ph.D. and he asked if I went to college. I said "Yes" and he asked what I was doing. I said I was teaching at Creighton University. His eyes went as big as pie plates, and he said rather sternly: "You know you'll have to get your Ph.D. to keep teaching." I said: "Yep, already got that." He said: "No shit!" and then apologized to my parents for the foul language. It was a good day.

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, December 13, 2019, 1:22:49 PM EST, Eric KE6US <eric.csuf@...> wrote:


There was a recent question in, I think, QRP-Tech group (now on groups.io) asking what level of math is required to understand W7ZOI's Radio Frequency Design.

This article shows that much of it was covered in high school math (OK, what would be called AP Math today). That doesn't in any way detract from the level of math used by practicing engineers in some cases, but it shows that the level needed to understand and successfully homebrew some very interesting designs is well within the reach of most hams.

Thanks for posting the article.

Eric KE6US

On 12/13/2019 9:17 AM, SkipF, NT1G wrote:

ajparent1/KB1GMX
 

Based on 50 years of doing the engineering thing 11th year math (applied algebra, trig,
and calculus) covered most of the cases in the slide rule era  for all but the most
exotic, computers solved the rest.  

On average a solid understanding of arithmetic helps.  Why?  The most common
problems rely on add subtract, multiply and divide and take a occasional square
root or log.  The latter two were made easier to do with a slide rule and later
pocket calc. The most often use application on my iPhone is the calculator!

For the missing part it is how is that applied and what does it mean.
RFD and EMRFD and SSD are classics that can answer better than 97%
of engineering level questions, the rest you need the antenna design books.
the Radio Amateurs Handbooks over the years were remarkable in the breadth
of subject matter.  As a kid in the 60s they supplied the answers or a good
idea where and what to look for in the library (long before before Altavista
and later google).

Allison
--
Please reply on list so we can share.
Off list email goes to trash, I had to due to scrapers.

mike.carden
 



On Sat, Dec 14, 2019 at 5:44 AM jjpurdum via Groups.Io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
 I told him I wanted to be an Electrical Engineer. He looked at me, then told my parents I wasn't smart enough to go to college and that I should plan on fixing farm equipment.

I can't even begin to relate the impact that had on me.

Ah, great story Jack. :)  Your experience puts me very much in mind of my partner. Her high school career counsellor suggested that she should perhaps work harder on her typing and become a secretary. That advice made her angry enough to pursue a University degree then a PhD. She never went back to challenge the career person, but legend has it that her Mum bumped into him in a supermarket one day and gleefully set the record straight.

I feel I owe that careers counsellor a beer for delivering to me the amazing Dr Mel.

-- 
MC
VK1MC