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Kit building microscope!

Rick Williams - VE7TK
 

I’m not sure if the parts in kits are getting significantly smaller or my eyes are getting older or perhaps both! I enjoy building and repairing electronics  BUT the tiny parts were getting difficult to handle.

 

So in an attempt to get into the 21st century I started looking for an electronic microscope. I settled on the Andonstar AD106S. I purchased it for about $90 CAN (less than $70US) from AliExpress.

 

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32962671069.html?spm=a2g0s.9042311.0.0.1f914c4du5sW0V

 

I love it! It has very good resolution and, with the Image Quality set to 5 Megapixels the screen refresh rate has little latency. (The default is 12 Megapixels and there is a delay that may make soldering awkward.)

 

Aside from the image quality, I chose the 106S because of the metal base, adjustable auxiliary lights, the UV filter (protecting the optics from solder splashes etc) and the price. This microscope DOES NOT have an HDMI port. Microscopes with such a port are generally more than double the price. The AD106S does have a Micro SD slot for storing pictures or video. These images can then be transferred to a computer using the free on-line software. Here’s a link to one of many YouTube reviews!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lEHhbH-l-So

 

My first test of the microscope was the construction of a QRP-Labs Shack Clock! It was fantastic for checking my soldering and looking for solder bridges!

 

I have just successfully finished working on another project that included TSOT-23 8-pin packages. I would NOT have attempted this construction without the AD106S.

 

I heartily recommend this microscope and it won’t be leaving my shack anytime soon!


--
73, Rick
VE7TK

Hew Lines
 

I agree with Rick. After he got his I also purchased one and fully agree with his comments

73 Hew VA7HU


On 2019-10-23 11:16 a.m., Rick Williams - VE7TK via Groups.Io wrote:

I’m not sure if the parts in kits are getting significantly smaller or my eyes are getting older or perhaps both! I enjoy building and repairing electronics  BUT the tiny parts were getting difficult to handle.

 

So in an attempt to get into the 21st century I started looking for an electronic microscope. I settled on the Andonstar AD106S. I purchased it for about $90 CAN (less than $70US) from AliExpress.

 

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32962671069.html?spm=a2g0s.9042311.0.0.1f914c4du5sW0V

 

I love it! It has very good resolution and, with the Image Quality set to 5 Megapixels the screen refresh rate has little latency. (The default is 12 Megapixels and there is a delay that may make soldering awkward.)

 

Aside from the image quality, I chose the 106S because of the metal base, adjustable auxiliary lights, the UV filter (protecting the optics from solder splashes etc) and the price. This microscope DOES NOT have an HDMI port. Microscopes with such a port are generally more than double the price. The AD106S does have a Micro SD slot for storing pictures or video. These images can then be transferred to a computer using the free on-line software. Here’s a link to one of many YouTube reviews!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lEHhbH-l-So

 

My first test of the microscope was the construction of a QRP-Labs Shack Clock! It was fantastic for checking my soldering and looking for solder bridges!

 

I have just successfully finished working on another project that included TSOT-23 8-pin packages. I would NOT have attempted this construction without the AD106S.

 

I heartily recommend this microscope and it won’t be leaving my shack anytime soon!


--
73, Rick
VE7TK

Bruce K1FFX
 

Interesting post, Rick ... 

How did you hold what you're working steady while soldering?  I use a small vise that I clamp the PCB into while soldering, and, from the pics,  not clear to me how I could integrate the two ... i.e, the vise and the microscope.

Thanks - 

Bruce K1FFX 

Rick Williams - VE7TK
 

In the case of the TSOT-23 I was mounting the chip onto an adapter board. The adapter board was plugged into an SK10 proto board.

To hold the chip in place I painted solder flux onto the adapter board pads. I melted a bit of solder on the pin #1 pad, placed the IC in the correct location and held it in place gently with a Q-tip (the cotton end had been removed) and melted the solder on pin #1. Once it was in position at pin #1 I went and soldered pin #5. Then on to all the rest.

ALL of this (IC, adapter board, SK-10 and microscope) took place in one of my wife's Pyrex cooking dishes. This contained run-away parts.
--
73, Rick
VE7TK