Date   
Re: #qcx #firmware #qcx #firmware

elliot.george.martin@...
 

The QCX already has an outstanding on board CW encoder AND decoder.
Does this mean I do not need a winkeyer to transmit CW? The other hams tell me I do but you seem to imply there is an internal one. I am wondering if there are cheaper options other than winkeyers you can buy.
Thanks,
Elliot

Re: Circuit Board Drills for cleaning out through-holes: Construction Tip

Mike
 

OUCH !.
I think that would possibly cause more trouble than it clears.
I use a cheap tooth-pick or cocktail stick to push through-holes clear by
heating the solder in the clogged hole, and then whilst its molton push the
tooth-pick into the hole with a spinning twist. results in clear holes with
intact through-hole plating.

On 3 Sep 2019 at 13:24, joe@... wrote:

For anyone interested, here is something handy to have if you have to replace
components on PC boards:

PCB Drill Bits:
www.amazon.com/dp/B07N393BVK/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_4SSBDbSQ60HAS (
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B07N393BVK/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_4SSBDbSQ60HAS )

These can be used to clean out through-holes after removing parts.  Really
comes in handy when you remove a part, and one lead connects to a heavy
ground or power plane that is hard to heat and thereby clean with solder
wick.  For this situation, solder wick will get the hole mostly clean, then
you can drill out the rest.  Make sure you use a bit that does not make the
hole larger...



Re: Circuit Board Drills for cleaning out through-holes: Construction Tip

ajparent1/KB1GMX
 

Doug, 

I really had to retrain (restrain) someone that used a variac to get his iron hotter
by running it at 140V!  He complained of burning boards and is tips and heater
elements (Ungar) didn't last.

Live long enough and you get to see a few things.  Then again for stripping
salvage boards a propane torch and chip extractor was fast!
Hint you had to be! 

Be careful out there.

Allison

Re: Circuit Board Drills for cleaning out through-holes: Construction Tip

Doug W
 

On Tue, Sep 3, 2019 at 04:05 PM, ajparent1/KB1GMX wrote:
Many very small tips have not enough mass to transfer heat and have to be
cranked to "11" and then are too hot
why don't you just make 10 hotter?

Re: Circuit Board Drills for cleaning out through-holes: Construction Tip

Jess Gypin <ontarget1911@...>
 

Drop of fresh solder while applying solder wick. Tried them all, this works.

On Sep 3, 2019, at 10:42 PM, Hans Summers <hans.summers@...> wrote:

Hi all

It seems people find a way that suits them and often the answer is different depending on the individual. 

Personally I'd worry about damaging the PCB by using a drill. 

What works best for me is an ordinary cheap solder sucker. Clearing out grounded holes is indeed more difficult and sometimes takes several attempts. A large enough soldering iron tip and enough power (I use 60W) helps. Another trick, a bit counter-intuitive, is to put a little EXTRA fresh solder on the pad. Having a bit of extra solder to suck through seems to help cleaning. 

73 Hans G0UPL

On Wed, Sep 4, 2019 at 1:10 AM Graham <planophore@...> wrote:

I use a lot of solderwice. I find it an essential kit and scratch building tool.

A bit of extra flux usually does the trick - a drop or two of either or just dip the end of your solder wick:

https://www.mgchemicals.com/products/solder-and-accessories/fluxes/no-clean-flux-halogen-free-8351

or

https://www.mgchemicals.com/products/solder-and-accessories/fluxes/rosin-flux-835

cheers, Graham ve3gtc


On 2019-09-03 21:05, ajparent1/KB1GMX wrote:
Yes that clears the holes but, if it is a true though hole (top and bottom connections and paths)
you may rip it out and now you have a partial connection and annoying troubleshooting issues.

Toothpick, bamboo skewer, are simple and easy to use.   A hot air tool (blow the hole clear)
or heated solder sucker.  I use a spring loaded solder sucker often but it requires heating
one side and aligning with the other.  It all technique.

Hint using enough of a tip with wattage but not thermal too hot will be less likely to muck
up the board.  Many very small tips have not enough mass to transfer heat and have to be
cranked to "11" and then are too hot.

Allison

Re: Circuit Board Drills for cleaning out through-holes: Construction Tip

ajparent1/KB1GMX
 

Regarding using enough heat... My other iron is a older(ancient) Weller WT60
a 60watt iron using a curie temp control and has a rather heave 1/4" tip
(that across but on edge quite fine!).  Its a 700 degree element tip.
Very effective for holes in ground planes both soldering them and
clearing them.  It has the mass to heat large surfaces, enough heater
watts to keep it hot and yet not overheat.

The resources i have is various solder sucker of the mechanical type,
Pace heated solder sucker, hot air rework station and my favorite is
to heat it and tap and the solder is forced by inertia to vacate the hole.
If that doesn't work I add solder as it adds flux and mass.

Drills and other abrasive tools including picks I tend to shun as
board damage is too likely.  Its bad enough to have ot remove a
bad part but then fixing the board because of that removal is
really painful.

Allison

Re: Circuit Board Drills for cleaning out through-holes: Construction Tip

dkwflight
 

HI
I have some experience with those carbide tiny drills.
They are Very Very fragile. They really need to be in a drill press with the board secure.
Better to use a small number drill HSS.
Use a lot of care unsoldering components easy to rip out a trace from the CB.
Good luck

Re: QCX beats the odds.

R. Tyson
 

There I go revealing my age !    >:-)
and absent mindedness. 

Reg       G4NFR

Re: 20 Meter QCX C25/C26 replaced - output power increased markedly

joe@...
 

OK - so it does work - I have the new caps and I still have the "modified L3" - 14 turns instead of 16.  My plan was to rewind L3, but since it's working, I'm thinking of just leaving it alone.  I am heard on WSPR.

The only thing is: at 13.8 volts, 4 watts output, the current consumption is about 680 mA during transmit - which is 150 mA more than the spec.  Again - nothing is calibrated, but I read 140 mA on receive with the same meter.  I'm not sure this is significant...

Re: Circuit Board Drills for cleaning out through-holes: Construction Tip

John Clements
 

I'll second the quilting pin technique.
https://kc9on.com/ham-radio/tips-and-tricks/

Re: #qcx #firmware #qcx #firmware

@CurtisM
 

On a very strong station, play with the qcx internal decoder. Then try fldigi. The RBN certainly can grab cw calls during a cq. But in general, ears work better. I had read of telegraph operators using decoding apparatus,  but they quickly discovered they could go faster copying by ear. Learn the alphabet gradually.

While its filter is a bit narrow, you can decode rtty and some other digital modes while you are learning cw. Just a cable to your pc soundcard.

Curt

Re: #qcx #firmware #qcx #firmware

John Kirby
 

 re  software encoders/decoders

The QCX already has an outstanding on board CW encoder AND decoder.

I am 100% sure more ops than not use stuff not between the ears for more than contesting but casual QSOs too.

Check out    N1MM+ 
Not only CW :
PSK31
RTTY
SSB voice too!

Software does it ALL to include CW key the QCX via USB COM PORT

The CW OP (to include SSB voice) touches nothing but function keys

CQ
SPOT
Search And Pounce
EXCHANGE
Score specific contest points (FieldDay for example)
Rate of QSO to Set target speed
RX/TX turnaround around
Log to almost any format/network/media with accuracy way better than human OP

NOTE... There are more than just a few free CW decoders up for grabbs, none are perfect, most decode best when band conditions are good and the other OP sends from a keyer such as W1AW practice sessions.

72 73
John
N3AAZ

Re: #qcx #firmware #qcx #firmware

Bill Cromwell
 

Hi Peter, Elliot

I agree about copying by ear. I have tried fldigi and some other decoding software but none of it was very good at copying under those 'real world' conditions.

And yes to the keying interface for typing on your computer to send CW on a CW transmitter. Sending tones to SSB transmitters to get CW hands you extra problems on a gilded platter. A CW keying interface for your computer is a worthwhile addition to your radio kit.

Best of luck and..

73,

Bill KU8H

On 9/4/19 4:23 AM, Peter GM0EUL wrote:
Hi, to type cw via a computer you need a keying interface of some sort, I use an Arduino-based home brew winkey emulator.  I can send you the link to make one if you like making, or get a real winkey.  Receiving is easier, take the audio out from the QCX into the computer mic or line-in and use a decoding program.
There are some very good encoding/decoding software available like FLdigi
Hope this helps to at least point you in the right direction.
If you want to learn cw check out the CWops CW Academy.  There are no decoders that can match a good human operator under real world conditions.
73
Peter GM0EUL
--
bark less - wag more

Re: Circuit Board Drills for cleaning out through-holes: Construction Tip

James Daldry W4JED
 

Hi, Allison

Good hint - make sure the iron has enough mass for desoldering. One more thing, though - melted solder rapidly oxidizes and produces slag. You can get a joint much cleaner by first removing as much solder as possible, then applying fresh solder - especially fresh 63/37 or 62/36/2 solder - to the joint and wicking again. This really helps when removing surface mount parts.

Jim W4JED

On 9/3/19 5:05 PM, ajparent1/KB1GMX wrote:
Yes that clears the holes but, if it is a true though hole (top and bottom connections and paths)
you may rip it out and now you have a partial connection and annoying troubleshooting issues.

Toothpick, bamboo skewer, are simple and easy to use.   A hot air tool (blow the hole clear)
or heated solder sucker.  I use a spring loaded solder sucker often but it requires heating
one side and aligning with the other.  It all technique.

Hint using enough of a tip with wattage but not thermal too hot will be less likely to muck
up the board.  Many very small tips have not enough mass to transfer heat and have to be
cranked to "11" and then are too hot.

Allison

Re: AGC

Axel
 

In QCX, AGC is strongly related with QSK. Sidetone goes the same way in the circuit as the received signal. And sidetone behaves like a very strong signal, hence AGC makes the RX quite deaf for maybe 100 ms.

Martin, I use QCX only for SOTA activations, and up to now, I did only one with AGC (will do more in the next 2 weeks, hopefully). My impression was, that QSK is not useless, but worse with AGC. But I need more experience from my upcoming usage.

If QSK became to bad, we can make the decay time of the AGC much faster, for example by replacing the 3.3 MOhm resistor by 330 KOhm.

Kind Regards,
Axel, DF1ET

Re: Circuit Board Drills for cleaning out through-holes: Construction Tip

Gerry Kavanagh <gerrykav@...>
 

In the past I have used a method of heating the solder until it is well melted, and then tapping the board on the workbench. This usually ends up with a nice clean holle and a small splash of solder that can be swept into the waste.
Of course this may not be appropriate for boards with delicate components.
/ Gerry

Re: Circuit Board Drills for cleaning out through-holes: Construction Tip

Stephen Farthing G0XAR JO92ON97
 

Hi all,

Try a stainless steel pin, you might find one in your sewing kit or your wife’s model aircraft tool box :-) Often they have glass ends. Heat up the joint until the solder is molten, then put the pin in the hole, push it in and twist it. The solder should push out without sticking to the pin. I’ve used this for years and it works well. If you are careful the vias should remain intact. 

Regards,

Steve G0XAR


Re: #qcx #firmware #qcx #firmware

Peter GM0EUL
 

Hi, to type cw via a computer you need a keying interface of some sort, I use an Arduino-based home brew winkey emulator.  I can send you the link to make one if you like making, or get a real winkey.  Receiving is easier, take the audio out from the QCX into the computer mic or line-in and use a decoding program.

There are some very good encoding/decoding software available like FLdigi

Hope this helps to at least point you in the right direction.  

If you want to learn cw check out the CWops CW Academy.  There are no decoders that can match a good human operator under real world conditions.

73
Peter GM0EUL

Re: Circuit Board Drills for cleaning out through-holes: Construction Tip

Jim Shepherd
 

I use one of these welding tip drill type cleaners. They  are not as sharp as the carbide set and tend to only cut through the solder.  https://www.amazon.com/Hobart-770086-Welding-Oxy-Acetylene-Cleaner/dp/B0017Z1SXA/ref=sr_1_16?crid=EGW1LFIK09UR&keywords=welding+tip+cleaner&qid=1567580531&s=hi&sprefix=welding+tip%2Ctools%2C1571&sr=1-16

Jim W6US

Re: Circuit Board Drills for cleaning out through-holes: Construction Tip

Hans Summers
 

Hi all

It seems people find a way that suits them and often the answer is different depending on the individual. 

Personally I'd worry about damaging the PCB by using a drill. 

What works best for me is an ordinary cheap solder sucker. Clearing out grounded holes is indeed more difficult and sometimes takes several attempts. A large enough soldering iron tip and enough power (I use 60W) helps. Another trick, a bit counter-intuitive, is to put a little EXTRA fresh solder on the pad. Having a bit of extra solder to suck through seems to help cleaning. 

73 Hans G0UPL

On Wed, Sep 4, 2019 at 1:10 AM Graham <planophore@...> wrote:

I use a lot of solderwice. I find it an essential kit and scratch building tool.

A bit of extra flux usually does the trick - a drop or two of either or just dip the end of your solder wick:

https://www.mgchemicals.com/products/solder-and-accessories/fluxes/no-clean-flux-halogen-free-8351

or

https://www.mgchemicals.com/products/solder-and-accessories/fluxes/rosin-flux-835

cheers, Graham ve3gtc


On 2019-09-03 21:05, ajparent1/KB1GMX wrote:
Yes that clears the holes but, if it is a true though hole (top and bottom connections and paths)
you may rip it out and now you have a partial connection and annoying troubleshooting issues.

Toothpick, bamboo skewer, are simple and easy to use.   A hot air tool (blow the hole clear)
or heated solder sucker.  I use a spring loaded solder sucker often but it requires heating
one side and aligning with the other.  It all technique.

Hint using enough of a tip with wattage but not thermal too hot will be less likely to muck
up the board.  Many very small tips have not enough mass to transfer heat and have to be
cranked to "11" and then are too hot.

Allison