Date   

Re: No Display....no operability #40m

Syd
 

Since this thing was working at one point and I have had a few problems with my kits doing somewhat the same thing I don't think any of the components are the problem. But from my own experience I would check around for loose connections and bad solder joints using a very good magnifying glass! You might think about using something like an old fashioned plastic alignment tool to poke around the top an bottom on the PCB and maybe get lucky to find a sensitive spot where you can look even closer. The other day my display went dead after a few months of use, and finally going back to my own advice, I rechecked the solder joints once again, voila there was another bad joint that I missed the first few times I looked. So far, in all the kits I've built, I have found 1 PP switch that fell apart, and a uProc on the signal generator that I inadvertently blew up when I mistakenly applied 10V to power up the 5V unit!
syd/wt1v


Re: QDX

Mike Besemer - WM4B
 

Mine came today too, but it’s going to be a while before I can get to it.  Too many irons in the fire!

 

Mike

WM4B

 

From: QRPLabs@groups.io [mailto:QRPLabs@groups.io] On Behalf Of Ryan Flowers
Sent: Friday, October 29, 2021 5:11 PM
To: QRPLabs@groups.io
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] QDX

 

QDX HAS ARRIVED. Sub my youtube channel for the rest, coming later today for sure!

--
Ryan Flowers - W7RLF
MiscDotGeek - QRP and More (Website)

QDX News, Tips, Build Series (YouTube)
QCX Mini "Mini Tip" Series (YouTube)
QCX Mini Troubleshooting and Repair (Website)


Re: QDX

Ryan Flowers
 

QDX HAS ARRIVED. Sub my youtube channel for the rest, coming later today for sure!

--
Ryan Flowers - W7RLF
MiscDotGeek - QRP and More (Website)

QDX News, Tips, Build Series (YouTube)
QCX Mini "Mini Tip" Series (YouTube)
QCX Mini Troubleshooting and Repair (Website)


Re: display jig quite dim #40m

Syd
 

I've used color coded wires to make sure the wires go to the correct pins on each connector.  I also ohmed out the connections to make sure the pin to  pin connections are correct and to make sure the soldering is OK, and, just to be certain about adjacent shorts, I also ohmed the wire that I checking for pin to pin continuity to the adjacent two pins on each side to make sure there were no shorts between pins. The thing works, but the display is very dim.  So now it seems like the only thing left to do is measure the vdc at all the important pins, especially the contrast control pin.  Got to be something simple.
syd/wt1v


Re: Mismatched antenna on Class-D & Class-E amplifier

Gary O'Neil
 

Hi Wolfgang;

     First and foremost... God Bless you for your persistence. :-)




--
72

Gary, N3GO


Re: How do the big companies make radios?

John AE5X
 

On Fri, Oct 29, 2021 at 02:19 PM, Jim Manley wrote:
The damage being done by clueless politicians
They are not clueless - the damage is quite intentional.
 
--
John AE5X
https://ae5x.blogspot.com


Re: Mismatched antenna on Class-D & Class-E amplifier

Roelof Bakker
 

Hello Wolfgang,

My QCX+ draws large current peaks when using an automatic antenna tuner running the full
gallon. It tripped the current limit setting of my power supply and I did not like it.

Tuning the antenna was proceeded with my K2....

Maybe running 1W will work, but this tuner needed a bit more juice to function properly.

Eventually I measured the impedance, plugged the figures in an on-line L-network calculator
and build a small L-tuner, using 1 coil and 1 capacitor. Tuner loss was less than with the
automatic tuner, which showed in an increased antenna current.

73,
Roelof, pa0rdt


Re: How do the big companies make radios?

Fred Spinner
 

The vast majority of people don't understand Probability, Statistics or even the central limit theorem, either.  Forget economics.  Next year is going to be very interesting.  I feel for my kids.

We still know how to build things in the West (including Europe) but who knows for how much longer?   There is a lot of biting your nose off to spite your face going on politically now... 

On Fri, Oct 29, 2021, 12:19 PM Jim Manley <jim.manley.mscs@...> wrote:
Hi Mike,

Most people don’t have the faintest clue how economics really works, even otherwise well-educated folks.  It drives _everything_ which is why the world is starting to resemble the last days of Rome.  The damage being done by clueless politicians and the unelected Administrative State at all levels of government is now being laid bare for all to see.

Most people don’t understand the laws of thermodynamics either, which start with “There’s no free lunch” (mass and energy are always conserved), and end with “You can’t ever break even” (entropy/chaos always increases up to the level of the universe with every conversion of energy).

If you like the price of energy spiking to about double in nine months, right on time for a worse Winter than last year’s, critical goods not being able to be offloaded from scores of continually-arriving foreign ships (let alone delivered to your local store), our citizens being abandoned overnight to be killed by terrorists, and otherwise witnessing the collapse of civilization, keep voting for the kinds of imbeciles currently asleep at the switch.

To quote from Pournelle’s and Niven’s “Oath of Fealty”, we’re witnessing “Evolution in Action”.  Only the strong survive and, yes, the barbed wire here in Montana is still working fine as both fencing to protect our lives, liberty, and prosperity, as well as a very nice center-fed, multi-band, half-wave dipole fan antenna array!

Good luck and  

Jim  KJ7JHE


On Fri, Oct 29, 2021 at 5:51 AM Mike Perry, WA4MP <editor@...> wrote:


> On Oct 28, 2021, at 9:50 pm, Mel Snyder <melsnyder@...> wrote:
>
> First Japan, and then China, crushed the US ham equipment makers. The speed with which old-line companies like Hallicrafters, National, E F Johnson, Clegg, etc crashed in the late 1960/early 1970s was breathtaking.


I’m old enough to remember the transition and to that I’d add Heathkit, so it wasn’t just labor costs that killed them. I suspect one reason was a broad economy of scale. When the Japanese used the transition to pc boards and transistors to take over electronic entertainment, that created an economy of scale (parts, assembly lines, manufacturing equipment) that helped the ham market despite its much more limited sales. And that transition was a factor. As a ham in high school, a local TV repair shop gave us old U.S.-made TVs that were no longer worth repairing. Almost all were hand-wired, with resistors and wires having to be placed and soldered from one tube socket to another. That’s an expensive way to build and TVs were expensive. We got our first TV the summer before my second grade. We were still using it ten years later when I went off to college.

To some extent the makers of ham gear also suffer from the same problem that haunts the makers of small sailboats. No matter how well-designed and built a small sailboat is, within a few years after it enters the market, the new sailboats are competing with used ones. Particularly in fiberglass, they simply don’t wear out. I bought one for $1200 well-enough designed that it had a longer run on the new market than most, but even there new could not compete with used. Someone in boat making told me that if it had gone back into production, it would have to sell for $15,000. $15,000 cannot compete with $1200.

Of course that ham radio market has another factor. Few people collect small sailboats much less large ones Quite a few hams collect old radios. That keeps their used price high.

There is a danger when large companies in democracies lose their ability to make some products, particularly with products that are vital in either pre-war tensions or wartime. Germany. for instance, dominated the making of quality binoculars at the outbreak of WWII. The Brits needed them, so I have been told an unwritten agreement was worked out. The Germans did nothing when Swiss companies bought (for resell to the Brits) far more binoculars than they needed. And the Brits did nothing when the Swiss bought larger-than-needed quantities of special metals needed in steel alloys.

Much has been written about how the Brits benefited from breaking Enigma, Germany’s military code. Little is said about how how those coded messages were received, many of them short range messages between nearby units. In many cases reception meant huge rhombic antennas atop 100-foot poles and connected to state-of-the-art National HRO receivers bought from the U.S. The ability of the U.S. to make such radios in the thousands was vital to the war effort. A memory of that still lingers. What remains of U.S. manufacturing of high-quality communications gear is driven by military contracts given to companies such as Collins.

Here you can find the history of those HRO radios. Note how they used coil sets to cover a wide range of frequencies.

https://radioblvd.com/National%20HRO.htm

—Mike Perry, WA4MP





Re: How do the big companies make radios?

Jim Manley
 

Hi Mike,

Most people don’t have the faintest clue how economics really works, even otherwise well-educated folks.  It drives _everything_ which is why the world is starting to resemble the last days of Rome.  The damage being done by clueless politicians and the unelected Administrative State at all levels of government is now being laid bare for all to see.

Most people don’t understand the laws of thermodynamics either, which start with “There’s no free lunch” (mass and energy are always conserved), and end with “You can’t ever break even” (entropy/chaos always increases up to the level of the universe with every conversion of energy).

If you like the price of energy spiking to about double in nine months, right on time for a worse Winter than last year’s, critical goods not being able to be offloaded from scores of continually-arriving foreign ships (let alone delivered to your local store), our citizens being abandoned overnight to be killed by terrorists, and otherwise witnessing the collapse of civilization, keep voting for the kinds of imbeciles currently asleep at the switch.

To quote from Pournelle’s and Niven’s “Oath of Fealty”, we’re witnessing “Evolution in Action”.  Only the strong survive and, yes, the barbed wire here in Montana is still working fine as both fencing to protect our lives, liberty, and prosperity, as well as a very nice center-fed, multi-band, half-wave dipole fan antenna array!

Good luck and  

Jim  KJ7JHE


On Fri, Oct 29, 2021 at 5:51 AM Mike Perry, WA4MP <editor@...> wrote:


> On Oct 28, 2021, at 9:50 pm, Mel Snyder <melsnyder@...> wrote:
>
> First Japan, and then China, crushed the US ham equipment makers. The speed with which old-line companies like Hallicrafters, National, E F Johnson, Clegg, etc crashed in the late 1960/early 1970s was breathtaking.


I’m old enough to remember the transition and to that I’d add Heathkit, so it wasn’t just labor costs that killed them. I suspect one reason was a broad economy of scale. When the Japanese used the transition to pc boards and transistors to take over electronic entertainment, that created an economy of scale (parts, assembly lines, manufacturing equipment) that helped the ham market despite its much more limited sales. And that transition was a factor. As a ham in high school, a local TV repair shop gave us old U.S.-made TVs that were no longer worth repairing. Almost all were hand-wired, with resistors and wires having to be placed and soldered from one tube socket to another. That’s an expensive way to build and TVs were expensive. We got our first TV the summer before my second grade. We were still using it ten years later when I went off to college.

To some extent the makers of ham gear also suffer from the same problem that haunts the makers of small sailboats. No matter how well-designed and built a small sailboat is, within a few years after it enters the market, the new sailboats are competing with used ones. Particularly in fiberglass, they simply don’t wear out. I bought one for $1200 well-enough designed that it had a longer run on the new market than most, but even there new could not compete with used. Someone in boat making told me that if it had gone back into production, it would have to sell for $15,000. $15,000 cannot compete with $1200.

Of course that ham radio market has another factor. Few people collect small sailboats much less large ones Quite a few hams collect old radios. That keeps their used price high.

There is a danger when large companies in democracies lose their ability to make some products, particularly with products that are vital in either pre-war tensions or wartime. Germany. for instance, dominated the making of quality binoculars at the outbreak of WWII. The Brits needed them, so I have been told an unwritten agreement was worked out. The Germans did nothing when Swiss companies bought (for resell to the Brits) far more binoculars than they needed. And the Brits did nothing when the Swiss bought larger-than-needed quantities of special metals needed in steel alloys.

Much has been written about how the Brits benefited from breaking Enigma, Germany’s military code. Little is said about how how those coded messages were received, many of them short range messages between nearby units. In many cases reception meant huge rhombic antennas atop 100-foot poles and connected to state-of-the-art National HRO receivers bought from the U.S. The ability of the U.S. to make such radios in the thousands was vital to the war effort. A memory of that still lingers. What remains of U.S. manufacturing of high-quality communications gear is driven by military contracts given to companies such as Collins.

Here you can find the history of those HRO radios. Note how they used coil sets to cover a wide range of frequencies.

https://radioblvd.com/National%20HRO.htm

—Mike Perry, WA4MP





Re: QDX

Stephen Farthing G0XAR JO92ON97
 

Hi all, 

Mine is stuck in France on the way to England. I just hope it gets across the channel before our moron of a Prime Minister blocks imports from the Eu. 

Stay safe,

Steve G0XAR 


Re: QDX

W8DU_Arnie
 

Now that is more like it, Jack.


Re: British electrical plugs

BrianB
 

Just for clarification. Domestic power in the US is 120/240vac split phase. The old 110vac and 115vac systems have been retired or converted decades ago.

73,
BrianB
N6CVO

"Hydroelectric Power-Plant Technician II"


Re: Mismatched antenna on Class-D & Class-E amplifier

Steve in Okinawa
 

I also want to read that article by Maxwell but am not an ARRL member. I do use TLDetails, often enough so it's on my taskbar. The big debate over whether reflected power is "lost" in a transmission line seems to be answered by AC6LA himself, as "yes". At least the way TLDetails calculates it, feedline loss is the sum of conduction loss, dielectric loss, and reflected loss, and the latter is usually by far the highest when VSWR is high.


Re: QDX

Hans Summers
 

Hi Bill, all

Several days delay is because we have a daily pickup by the local FedEx agent. It then goes through several stages to get to Izmir 250km North which is where the nearest TNT depot is. This takes several days and during that time the status shows as "collecting". TNT website deliver estimates don't take this into account and are therefore inaccurate. 

73 Hans G0UPL
http://qrp-labs.com


-------- Original message --------
From: Bill Satterwhite <billsatone@...>
Date: Fri, Oct 29, 2021, 9:13 PM
To: QRPLabs@groups.io
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] QDX
Yes, All my orders from QRPLabs using TNT seem to remain in a Collecting status for days. Very frustrating. But I'm happy there is tracking and the shipping cost isn't too high. Everthing has eventually gotten to me. Things could be a lot worse.  Some American customers have reported customs has sometimes misread a period as a comma, changing a $10.000 (ten dollar) item to $10,000 (ten thousand dollars) thereby increasing import fees. But Hans is terrific. His products, manuals and services are great. Fantastic group support and videos.

-------- Original message --------
From: "Knut Steinar Fremme OE4KSF via groups.io" <steinar@...>
Date: 10/29/21 1:57 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: QRPLabs@groups.io
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] QDX


I received an email from QRP Labs on 26/10 that my  order 49973 was shipped - and an email from TNT that they had my order and had the status of "collecting"

The order is still in "Collecting" status at 29/10 - so it will take some time to reach me I'm afraid    

But one day - it will be here - hehe

73 - Knut 


Re: QDX

Bill Satterwhite
 

Yes, All my orders from QRPLabs using TNT seem to remain in a Collecting status for days. Very frustrating. But I'm happy there is tracking and the shipping cost isn't too high. Everthing has eventually gotten to me. Things could be a lot worse.  Some American customers have reported customs has sometimes misread a period as a comma, changing a $10.000 (ten dollar) item to $10,000 (ten thousand dollars) thereby increasing import fees. But Hans is terrific. His products, manuals and services are great. Fantastic group support and videos.

-------- Original message --------
From: "Knut Steinar Fremme OE4KSF via groups.io" <steinar@...>
Date: 10/29/21 1:57 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: QRPLabs@groups.io
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] QDX


I received an email from QRP Labs on 26/10 that my  order 49973 was shipped - and an email from TNT that they had my order and had the status of "collecting"

The order is still in "Collecting" status at 29/10 - so it will take some time to reach me I'm afraid    

But one day - it will be here - hehe

73 - Knut 


Re: Mismatched antenna on Class-D & Class-E amplifier

Wolfgang OE1MWW
 

Hi all.
interesting discussion - but I never ever asked about hints for a tuner - resistive or not ;-)
OK, FYI, I do own an ATU-100 (Chinese clone), a mAT-10 (similar to the Electraft T1 tuner)
and a small manual MFJ tuner (somewhere in the junk box).

As the title of my first post says: "Mismatched antenna on Class-D 
& Class-E amplifier"
and it said nothing about tuner...and so on...


I wanted to know, if a mismatched PA will blow up in smoke or what will happen?
Found this document: https://ris.utwente.nl/ws/portalfiles/portal/59478591/TMTT_AliGhahremani.pdf
"Load-Mismatch Sensitivity of Class-E Power Amplifiers" (very academic paper) but I am not sure
if this will apply to the RF amplifier of the QCX-series or or QDX

PLEASE - I would like to discuss about mismatched Class-D and Class-E RF amplifier and experiences
someone had with this issue - and no hints and advises about any kind of tuner :-)

73's de OE1MWW
Wolfgang


Re: QDX

jjpurdum
 

There's only one way to judge messiness. If you can toss a grenade into the room, return a minute later, and it looks unchanged, it's probably just right.

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, October 29, 2021, 01:53:19 PM EDT, Ryan Flowers <geocrasher@...> wrote:


I find myself in the middle. Too clean and I can't find anything, too cluttered and I can't find anything! 


--
Ryan Flowers - W7RLF
MiscDotGeek - QRP and More (Website)

QDX News, Tips, Build Series (YouTube)
QCX Mini "Mini Tip" Series (YouTube)
QCX Mini Troubleshooting and Repair (Website)


Re: Mismatched antenna on Class-D & Class-E amplifier

Ronald Taylor
 

Wolfgang:

"How do Class-D (QDX) and Class-E amplifier (QCX series) react/behave on 
mismatched antenna, right before tuning and setting a match on cable end ?"

These particular amplifier designs do not have the capability to reduce their output in the presence of High SWR. So, to answer your original question, the way they react is to get hot and/or fail rapidly due to high voltages present in that condition. 

73 ... Ron

On Fri, Oct 29, 2021 at 10:29 AM Robert M0NVQ via groups.io <m0nvq=mailbox.org@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Wolfgang,

Rhett is spot on.  I use the resistive bridge circuit by the G-QRP Club at this link Resistive SWR Bridge (gqrp.com)
I had most of the bits in my junk box.
Switch position 1 lets you calibrate the moving coil meter.
Switch position 2 lets you test your antenna, subjecting your transmitter to a worst-case SWR of 3:1.  Also, with your antenna in one leg of the bridge, the hf power is split 4 ways, which means that lets say with a transmitter output power of 4 watts, you are only polluting the frequency with 1 watt. It also means you could still call QRL 'Is this frequency in use?', with a reduced risk of damaging your transmitter.
Switch position 3  connects the transceiver directly to the antenna.

It may seem difficult to buy 50 ohm resistors, but two 2 watt 100 ohm resistors in parallel (carbon not wire wound) work fine.  If you also put two 2 watt 100 ohm resistors in parallel in the fourth leg of the bridge in place of your antenna, you will have a 16 watt dummy load.

The resistive bridge should be connected to the transceiver with the shortest coax possible and any long coax run should be from the bridge to the antenna.

I can supply photos of my quickly built resistive bridge if required. 

Best regards,
Robert M0NVQ
     


Re: A remote QDX....

Earl
 

Peter,

Could you make LoRa work https://youtu.be/hMOwbNUpDQA  and skip the CAT 5?

I power my remote equipment using a battery and a solar panel.  [My U3S has been running for years now in the back garden from a solar panel and battery.]   Much easier than running 100m of cable. 

FYI I am running my QDX from WSJT on a Raspberry Pi 4.  Why waste all those watts on a desktop computer?  

Looking forward to updates on your project.

73

Earl  4Z4TJ / VA6TJ


Re: QDX

Ryan Flowers
 

I find myself in the middle. Too clean and I can't find anything, too cluttered and I can't find anything! 


--
Ryan Flowers - W7RLF
MiscDotGeek - QRP and More (Website)

QDX News, Tips, Build Series (YouTube)
QCX Mini "Mini Tip" Series (YouTube)
QCX Mini Troubleshooting and Repair (Website)

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