Date   

Re: Off topic:

jjpurdum
 

Jim:

Talk about gov't delays. When I lived in Indiana, the Legislature raised the minimum property tax rate, but also the assessed value rate. My property taxes went from $1167/yr to $4223/yr overnight!  There was literally a revolution throughout the state. In Marion country, voters threw out every Councilman who supported the increase--18 out of 23! The Legislature saw the error of their ways and said that, if voters would support a 0.5% increase in the sale tax, they would roll back the property tax changes. Voters said ok.

It took them 16 days to approved and implement the higher sales tax rate, and 3 years to change the property tax rates. Lesson learned: If you accept an increase in one for a reduction in the other, they both go into effect on the same day.

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, May 29, 2020, 11:09:37 AM EDT, Jim Manley <jim.manley@...> wrote:


Hi Ted and Hans,

I'm so glad you provided that glimpse of Akihabara (especially the photos), as my post had already grown far too long. Family and friends have diagnosed themselves as suffering from my 200 wpm "diarrhea of the fingertips"!

Of course, when I said that I lived on the base at Kamiseya, I lied.  I was on a 2-2-2-80 shift schedule that two day watches 7 AM - 3 PM, eight hours off (the dreaded double-back), two graveyard watches 11 PM - 7 AM, eight hours off, two evening watches 3 PM - 11 PM, and then 80 hours off.  The first 24 hours were spent sleeping, and the.remainder I lived at ... Akihabara!

The yen-dollar exchange rate was as high as 270:1, but it got as low as 165:1, while I was there, which is now a dream lost to time, with the current rate around 108:1.  Our cost-of-living allowance changed to theoretically keep our purchasing power constant, but for some reason, whenever the rate went down, it took months to be reflected in our pay, but the moment it went up, BAM, our pay was reduced!

Ah, to dream, perchance to sleep ...

Jim  KJ7JHE
Lame Deer Montana High School Amateur Radio Club  KJ7JKU


On Fri, May 29, 2020 at 1:36 AM Ted 2E0THH <qrp@...> wrote:

Fabulous insight Jim

 

My first visit was only back in the '80s but I’ve been there nearly every year since, sometimes more. I worked in music and more specifically flew one of those huge mixing consoles (SSL) that was mandatory in every recording studio back then. Like any complex bit of kit it had a huge manual but there were many ways to make it work for you that weren't written in there.

 

I honestly will never forget the look of horror of the Japanese assistant techs  as I "bent" the rules of operation, there was much manual page fumbling and protest but I managed to forge on citing translation difficulties.

 

That first session was a long project, 6 weeks I think so we got to know each other very well. By then I was reasonably world travelled but Tokyo was a utter culture shock. All of the Japanese involved in that project were so unbelievably hospitable and generous, way beyond anything I had ever known and it is a testament to the trust we built that I still remain friends with most from that first visit. Music still takes me back there most years but alas not this one for obvious reasons.

 

Those guys introduced me to a district of Tokyo around Akihabara Station in the Chiyoda ward of Tokyo. There is nothing you can do to prepare yourself for the onslaught of the visual and audio cacophony that awaits; there are certainly no words I can write here that will describe it but it has become a Mecca for me and I have made the pilgrimage on almost every visit. 


A visit here should be on every ham's bucket list, for underneath the railway arches by the station there is a labyrinth of corridors which hosts a mini market of EVERYTHING electronic. The pitches are arranged along one wall and are about 2 metres wide with the trader lurking in the shadows behind trays and trays of beautifully arranged components, the more successful have bigger areas but it is the presentation of the components on offer that is so breathtaking. If you have any old '60s radio that has lost a foot, you will find it here, 813 tetrode with a thoriated tungsten filament, no problem. Really they have everything, there was even an HRO there last November.

 




I know of one other regular poster on this forum that knows this area rather well
J

 

73s Ted
2E0THH


Re: QCX-SSB Help what do I do now? #qcx

Ryan Flowers
 

I think you're looking for this:


It's an updated form factor of the QCX. 


On Fri, May 29, 2020 at 8:30 AM <wfcaston@...> wrote:
Peter,

Where can I get info on the new QCX rig that is coming out probably later this year?  Is it possible it is a multi band unit?  I am just coming up to speed on my 20 meter QCX, but looking ahead.  Thanks,

Frank
WV4C


--
Ryan Flowers - W7RLF
MiscDotGeek - QRP and More


Re: QCX-SSB Help what do I do now? #qcx

wfcaston@...
 

Peter,

Where can I get info on the new QCX rig that is coming out probably later this year?  Is it possible it is a multi band unit?  I am just coming up to speed on my 20 meter QCX, but looking ahead.  Thanks,

Frank
WV4C


Re: A great QCX-QCX contact and salute to youth

Jim Manley
 

Hi Ted and Hans,

I'm so glad you provided that glimpse of Akihabara (especially the photos), as my post had already grown far too long. Family and friends have diagnosed themselves as suffering from my 200 wpm "diarrhea of the fingertips"!

Of course, when I said that I lived on the base at Kamiseya, I lied.  I was on a 2-2-2-80 shift schedule that two day watches 7 AM - 3 PM, eight hours off (the dreaded double-back), two graveyard watches 11 PM - 7 AM, eight hours off, two evening watches 3 PM - 11 PM, and then 80 hours off.  The first 24 hours were spent sleeping, and the.remainder I lived at ... Akihabara!

The yen-dollar exchange rate was as high as 270:1, but it got as low as 165:1, while I was there, which is now a dream lost to time, with the current rate around 108:1.  Our cost-of-living allowance changed to theoretically keep our purchasing power constant, but for some reason, whenever the rate went down, it took months to be reflected in our pay, but the moment it went up, BAM, our pay was reduced!

Ah, to dream, perchance to sleep ...

Jim  KJ7JHE
Lame Deer Montana High School Amateur Radio Club  KJ7JKU


On Fri, May 29, 2020 at 1:36 AM Ted 2E0THH <qrp@...> wrote:

Fabulous insight Jim

 

My first visit was only back in the '80s but I’ve been there nearly every year since, sometimes more. I worked in music and more specifically flew one of those huge mixing consoles (SSL) that was mandatory in every recording studio back then. Like any complex bit of kit it had a huge manual but there were many ways to make it work for you that weren't written in there.

 

I honestly will never forget the look of horror of the Japanese assistant techs  as I "bent" the rules of operation, there was much manual page fumbling and protest but I managed to forge on citing translation difficulties.

 

That first session was a long project, 6 weeks I think so we got to know each other very well. By then I was reasonably world travelled but Tokyo was a utter culture shock. All of the Japanese involved in that project were so unbelievably hospitable and generous, way beyond anything I had ever known and it is a testament to the trust we built that I still remain friends with most from that first visit. Music still takes me back there most years but alas not this one for obvious reasons.

 

Those guys introduced me to a district of Tokyo around Akihabara Station in the Chiyoda ward of Tokyo. There is nothing you can do to prepare yourself for the onslaught of the visual and audio cacophony that awaits; there are certainly no words I can write here that will describe it but it has become a Mecca for me and I have made the pilgrimage on almost every visit. 


A visit here should be on every ham's bucket list, for underneath the railway arches by the station there is a labyrinth of corridors which hosts a mini market of EVERYTHING electronic. The pitches are arranged along one wall and are about 2 metres wide with the trader lurking in the shadows behind trays and trays of beautifully arranged components, the more successful have bigger areas but it is the presentation of the components on offer that is so breathtaking. If you have any old '60s radio that has lost a foot, you will find it here, 813 tetrode with a thoriated tungsten filament, no problem. Really they have everything, there was even an HRO there last November.

 




I know of one other regular poster on this forum that knows this area rather well
J

 

73s Ted
2E0THH


Re: QCX vs. QCX+ Form Factor Question

Ted 2E0THH
 

Hi Serge
I use these folding feet on my rig which employs very similar boxes to the one destined for the QCX+







https://www.metcase.co.uk/en/Enclosure-Feet/M6420204.htm

Roger
I have successfully made a bale for the stepper driver box that drives my telescope. I used a coat hanger, one I found with very think wire. Just used a vice, a hammer, some trig and an awful lot of Anglo Saxon. Very pleased with the result.

73s Ted
2E0THH


Re: QCX Plus 50 Watt PA Combo

George Korper
 

Tisha,

for your intuitive use:
Band:20 meters
Output: 30 Watts
Voltage: 19 V
Heatsink: top of QCX + case
Longest transmission, 2 ea.  3x3 CQ, followed by QSO basic exchange of OP, QTH and RST, Callsign.
                                     normal speed 18 wpm. 

I have hardly heated up the heatsink so far, so I am thinking, taking your suggestion of leaving on board and drilling
a couple of holes in the top of the case and using it as a heatsink. 

What do you think?

George


On Fri, May 29, 2020 at 9:28 AM Tisha Hayes <Tisha.Hayes@...> wrote:
It is probably a bad idea to seperate the PA transistors (IRF510) too far from the circuit board. Since they are trying to work together in a push-pull arrangement to drive a few amps of RF current through a transformer at high frequencies you are going to run in to all sorts of problems that will not be easy to predict or replicate for each different installation. 

Determining if the heat sink is sufficient requires quite a few data-points;

1. Power level you will be running at
2. Band you will be operating on
3. SWR that the amplifier sees from the antenna system
4. DC supply voltage and current
5. Duty cycle of the transmitter and mode of operation
6. Type of heat sink (aluminum finned, copper, just a steel plate)
7. Acceptable temperature rise of the PA
8. Thermal conductivity of the junction between the PA and heat sink
9. Convection cooled heat sink or forced air
....

You can see why many designers will put some margin in heat sink selection or incorporate devices to measure temperature at the PA to fold back the power or put the amplifier in to protection mode to prevent the magic smoke packets from being released.
--
Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Sr Engineer, 4RF Inc.


Re: Heresy follows Re: [QRPLabs] IRF510 #alignment #magic of hollow state #alignment #magic

Bob Benedict, KD8CGH
 

I didn't mean to imply that the HW-16 is my only hollow state electronics - just that it's on the bench.
I recreated my '60s novice station with a rare, and weird, Mosley CM-1 receiver, Heathkit DX-60 transmitter, HG-10 VFO and HD-11 Q-multiplier.

--
  73
    KD8CGH


Re: QCX vs. QCX+ Form Factor Question

Roger Hill
 

I would prefer a wire bail that folds down, rather than folding feet. I find that folding feet (e.g. like on the Drake R8) tend to be flimsy.

Roger

G3YTN

---
***************************
Roger Hill
***************************


On 2020-05-29 09:51, Hans Summers wrote:

Hi Serge
 
There are no folding feet. If someone has a suggestion, that could become popular. As supplied, it will, as documented, have four self-adhesive feet. 
 
73 Hans G0UPL
http://qrp-labs.com

On Fri, May 29, 2020 at 4:20 PM Serge, ON4AA <serge@...> wrote:

Yes, Hans, I also see potential for your stalagmites not meeting my stalactites :-D

On a different note, will the enclosure have a pair of folding feet under the front? I want to avoid getting a stiff neck in the field... (not the US police kind of stiff neck, though.)




Re: QCX vs. QCX+ Form Factor Question

Hans Summers
 

Hi Serge

There are no folding feet. If someone has a suggestion, that could become popular. As supplied, it will, as documented, have four self-adhesive feet. 

73 Hans G0UPL
http://qrp-labs.com

On Fri, May 29, 2020 at 4:20 PM Serge, ON4AA <serge@...> wrote:

Yes, Hans, I also see potential for your stalagmites not meeting my stalactites :-D

On a different note, will the enclosure have a pair of folding feet under the front? I want to avoid getting a stiff neck in the field… (not the US police kind of stiff neck, though.)


Re: QCX Plus 50 Watt PA Combo

Tisha Hayes
 

It is probably a bad idea to seperate the PA transistors (IRF510) too far from the circuit board. Since they are trying to work together in a push-pull arrangement to drive a few amps of RF current through a transformer at high frequencies you are going to run in to all sorts of problems that will not be easy to predict or replicate for each different installation. 

Determining if the heat sink is sufficient requires quite a few data-points;

1. Power level you will be running at
2. Band you will be operating on
3. SWR that the amplifier sees from the antenna system
4. DC supply voltage and current
5. Duty cycle of the transmitter and mode of operation
6. Type of heat sink (aluminum finned, copper, just a steel plate)
7. Acceptable temperature rise of the PA
8. Thermal conductivity of the junction between the PA and heat sink
9. Convection cooled heat sink or forced air
....

You can see why many designers will put some margin in heat sink selection or incorporate devices to measure temperature at the PA to fold back the power or put the amplifier in to protection mode to prevent the magic smoke packets from being released.
--
Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Sr Engineer, 4RF Inc.


Re: Bad news #40m

 

More from a troubleshooting aid point-of-view  as components are being replaced when doing a repair. 
--
73, Bernie, VE3FWF


Re: Battery recommendations for portable ops?

john.rogers@...
 

On Wed, May 13, 2020 at 06:46 AM, <john.rogers@...> wrote:
I use a second 3S in series with the radio battery to power the 50W amp
Correction: I use a 3S to power the QCX and 2S in series to power the 50W amp. 6S would be too high voltage. John


Re: QCX vs. QCX+ Form Factor Question

Serge, ON4AA
 

Yes, Hans, I also see potential for your stalagmites not meeting my stalactites :-D

On a different note, will the enclosure have a pair of folding feet under the front? I want to avoid getting a stiff neck in the field… (not the US police kind of stiff neck, though.)


Re: [help] Only noise being seen while IQ balance / phase lo / phase hi.

dl8lrz
 

Hi,
short test for IC10
Check again whether the marking on the circuit shows the display (ok, already done 100 times)
Use a protective resistor Rp approx. 220 Ohm (against unwanted short circuit), do not connect voltages directly to the PINs.
Connect voltmeter to PIN7
+ 12V via Rp at PIN5 -> PIN7 high, about 12V
+ 12V via Rp at PIN6 -> PIN7 low, about 0V
0V via Rp at PIN6 -> PIN7 high, about 12V
0V via Rp at PIN5 -> PIN7 low, about 0V
Remove Rp

Connect PIN7 and PIN6 directly (analog IC10A) -> PIN7 5V +/- (approximately equal to PIN5); if 12V -> IC defective?
remove the wire PIN7 - PIN6
if no 5V +/- at PIN7:
remove R37
if 5V +/- at PIN7 -> C22 defective ???
if further 12V -> IC10 defective ???

The voltages at PIN7 and PIN1 should be approximately the same.


  • "10k resistors, R39&40. =    10k confirmed.  solder continuity good.
  • 12 volt side of R40, =       11.9v
  • the junction of R39&40 =   3.32v
  • ground side of R39. =      zero"
The voltage should be about 4.2V (Manual), 3.32V is little. If C24 is installed with the correct polarity, this can indicate a defective IC10 ??

vy 73 Reiner


Re: #ocxo #ocxo

Alan G4ZFQ
 

regarding the external screen as shown in the OCXO photo for my U3S multiband.  I can't put it because it hits the IC1 below. I'd like to ask you if it's important and necessary to put it or it's optional.  thanks
Giuseppe,

I do not understand.
What does it touch?
IC1 is on the other side of the board. It's pins are seen at the left side, away from the cover.

This cover helps to screen and maybe more importantly to stop air currents from affecting the temperature.


Re: QCX vs. QCX+ Form Factor Question

Hans Summers
 

Hi Serge

Yes, I see...

The wide thickness of your assembly is due to the circuit board and the battery holders all adding up as thickness. 

Well there are some potential ways you could make it fit. The area is large. But 30.5mm is the limit to the depth - this assumes the components above the QCX+ PCB are allowed a height of 12mm. The only components which need this height are the LPF toroids, the electrolytic capacitors, and the 24-turn trimmer potentiometers. 

So perhaps, with careful orientation, your board could be positioned such that the "high" parts of the QCX+ circuit didn't interfere with the big parts of the battery controller board. Bolt the board to the roof with standoffs and make sure the positioning is such that the stalagmites never meet the stalagmites. 

OR... use the QCX+ Dev kit board, and separate the battery holders of your assembly, from the board. There seems to be plenty of space to have them side by side. 

OR... you could make the LPF toroids in the QCX+, and the capacitors and 24-turn trimmer pots, lie down - where necessary? The QCX+ PCB has lots of spare area so there is room to make things like down like that. 

Several options - but will take some experiment! 

73 Hans G0UPL
http://qrp-labs.com

On Fri, May 29, 2020 at 1:11 PM Serge, ON4AA <serge@...> wrote:

Here is the Wondom BCPB2 3S 18650 MPPT BMS I am talking about. Leaving out the DC connector, it is still 31.5 mm high with the electrolytic capacitors being the next highest components. However, if necessary, 1 mm can still be shaved off by replacing the 18650 cell holders.

It is pretty cheap, to the point that you perhaps could integrate it with your transceiver by default. The MPPT allows it to be used with a 18 to 24 V solar panel.

I got the idea of a video from Gil, F4WBY. He also employs this to supply power to his QCX radios. (Do not follow his suggestion of soldering directly to the cell terminals, though. Just apply once external power to the board to get it running.)

Wondom 3S 18650 BMS

The newer version PCBs have extra headers to drive external power level LEDs, without the need to add any extra series resistors.


Re: #ocxo #ocxo

Roger Hill
 

Sorry Giuseppe...I cannot help as I have never built one, but I am sure there are others here who can help.

Roger

G3YTN

---
***************************
Roger Hill
***************************


On 2020-05-29 07:15, GIUSEPPE wrote:

Hello everyone, my name is Giuseppe iu8eun. I would like to ask you for help regarding the external screen as shown in the OCXO photo for my U3S multiband.  I can't put it because it hits the IC1 below. I'd like to ask you if it's important and necessary to put it or it's optional.  thanks


#ocxo #ocxo

GIUSEPPE
 

Hello everyone, my name is Giuseppe iu8eun. I would like to ask you for help regarding the external screen as shown in the OCXO photo for my U3S multiband.  I can't put it because it hits the IC1 below. I'd like to ask you if it's important and necessary to put it or it's optional.  thanks


Re: ProgRock OCXO and GPS locked frequency accuracy.

Phil Crockford
 

I have done investigation on the accuracy of the GPS control using the Synth module in both the PRO-ROCK and the VFO Sig-gen and I also confirm a frequency difference between an off air standard and the GPS locked frequency derived by the two products.

If a synth module is used in the PRO-Rock it produces a frequency which deviates from the programed frequency by around 2 Hz and does not seem to attempt to correct any further in order to align with the off air standard. However if the same synth module is used in the VFO SIG-Gen and corrected by the same GPS used for the PRO-Rock the Sig-Gen produces an accuracy of better than .5Hz from the programmed frequency and continues to correct itself from then on.

Until now I have resolved to apply a correction to the programmed frequency when using in the Pro-Rock and was content not to communicate my findings to the group. I have a number of Synth modules , OCXO and standard and find the same with all modules when compared in this manner.

The initial acquisition process in the Pro-Rock seems to work well but once this is achieved it seems reluctant to control the frequency any further.

This test have been done with the correction set to 001 and also set to 000 but the pro-rock seems to fail to control the frequency to within less than 2Hz.

Both the Sig-Gen and the Pro-Rock have been run at the same time and controlled by the same GPS using two Synth modules known to exhibit the 2Hz error. The Sig-Gen produces a frequency that is correct to within less than .5Hz but he Pro-Rock Controls to within 2Hz.

 

This email is by way of information and is not intended a criticism of any  product.

 

G8IOA

 

 

From: QRPLabs@groups.io [mailto:QRPLabs@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mark Horn
Sent: 09 May 2020 19:26
To: QRPLabs@groups.io
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] ProgRock OCXO and GPS locked frequency accuracy.

 

Hans, 

Forget my last message after three hours of being within 0.5ppm I went for dinner and when I came back it was off by 1.5Hz again.  :-(  I'll leave it run for another hour and see what it measures then.

73 Mark
M0WGF


Re: ProgRock + TCXO + GPS Stability/Accuracy

Phil Crockford
 

I have done investigation on the accuracy of the GPS control using the Synth module in both the PRO-ROCK and the VFO Sig-gen and I also confirm a frequency difference between an off air standard and the GPS locked frequency derived by the two products.

If a synth module is used in the PRO-Rock it produces a frequency which deviates from the programed frequency by around 2 Hz and does not seem to attempt to correct any further in order to align with the off air standard. However if the same synth module is used in the VFO SIG-Gen and corrected by the same GPS used for the PRO-Rock the Sig-Gen produces an accuracy of better than .5Hz from the programmed frequency and continues to correct itself from then on.

Until now I have resolved to apply a correction to the programmed frequency when using in the Pro-Rock and was content not to communicate my findings to the group. I have a number of Synth modules , OCXO and standard and find the same with all modules when compared in this manner.

The initial acquisition process in the Pro-Rock seems to work well but once this is achieved it seems reluctant to control the frequency any further.

This test have been done with the correction set to 001 and also set to 000 but the pro-rock seems to fail to control the frequency to within less than 2Hz.

Both the Sig-Gen and the Pro-Rock have been run at the same time and controlled by the same GPS using two Synth modules known to exhibit the 2Hz error. The Sig-Gen produces a frequency that is correct to within less than .5Hz but he Pro-Rock Controls to within 2Hz.

 

This email is by way of information and is not intended a criticism of any  product.

 

G8IOA

 

 

From: QRPLabs@groups.io [mailto:QRPLabs@groups.io] On Behalf Of Hans Summers
Sent: 28 May 2020 11:14
To: QRPLabs@groups.io
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] ProgRock + TCXO + GPS Stability/Accuracy

 

Hello Giuseppe

 

Setting register 3 to zero affects how often the frequency is updated. It does NOT affect how often the EEPROM is updated, using the Reference Clock value held in RAM. 

 

The calibrated Reference Clock value held in RAM is only written to EEPROM if the difference between the existing EEPROM value and the RAM value exceeds 10Hz. Therefore in practice the EEPROM is updated rarely. 

 

73 Hans G0UPL
http://qrp-labs.com

 

On Thu, May 28, 2020 at 10:27 AM Giuseppe Marullo <giuseppe@...> wrote:

Hi Hans,

this is what is written in the manual:

"If you set the register to have a value of 0, then the microcontroller
will adjust the Si5351A output frequencies once per second, every
second, depending on whether it thinks the 27MHz frequency has drifted
upwards or downwards. This continuous change in output frequency may not
be desirable. It is more practical to have small jumps in output
frequencies, less often – i.e. only when the reference oscillator has
changed by more than a threshold.
The QRP Labs website has some notes on how to obtain excell"

How often I could expect the eeprom to be written if I set the register
3 to 0?
Could you recommend 24/7 operation?

TIA

Giuseppe Marullo
IW2JWW - JN45RQ

On 5/28/2020 8:45 AM, Hans Summers wrote:
> Hi Giuseppe
>
> FYI the ProgRock does not write to EEPROM once per second. It only
> writes to EEPROM once in a while when the error (stored ref freq value
> to actual value held in RAM) exceeds a threshold. So writing to EEPROM
> is quite rare and does not wear out the EEPROM (rated 100,000 cycles
> in the datasheet; I saw some practical experiments on an ATmega328 to
> try and destroy the EEPROM and it actually lasted nearer to 1 million
> in practice).
>
> I have a beta ProgRock version which allows update of the frequency
> via the serial port, without writing the registers to EEPROM - so that
> would be useful in an application where the constructor wishes to do
> things like repeated frequency sweeps, and not wear out the EEPROM.
>
> 73 Hans G0UPL
> http://qrp-labs.com
>
> On Thu, May 28, 2020 at 5:39 AM Giuseppe Marullo <giuseppe@...
> <mailto:giuseppe@...>> wrote:
>
>     Hi Sid,
>
>     I know that some people got their "quirks" with the accuracy of this,
>     you were not the only one looking back the ML.
>     I have received a new MCU, to rule out eeprom wear, since I kept it
>     powered several weeks and if fhe eeprom is written once a second,
>     well I
>     expect it not to work anymore, theoretically it will die after
>     27hours.
>     I was past 10x this period, easily.
>
>     My problem is not that it is not spot on on 10MHz. The problem is
>     that
>     it stays about 2.4Hz below 10MHz of my Trimble. It is almost
>     constant,
>     like either my Trimble is not 10MHz and it is stable, let's say it
>     is @
>     10.0000024MHz, or ProgRock decides that 9.9999976MHJz is the right
>     frequency. I am evaluating getting another source for my lab, if I
>     could
>     acquire at a decent price. Unfortunately there is no visible feedback
>     from the ProgRock about what is really doing, if it consider itself
>     within range or what.
>
>      >The most common "solution" recommended is to replace the xtal
>     with a
>     TCXO which is no solution that simply masks the problem. That's the
>     discipline...use a clock source that does not drift!!
>     Hehe, mind to give me a DigiKey part number with less than 12
>     digits in
>     the price column? Everything drifts within a hobbyist budget, that
>     the
>     point in the disciplined part of their name.
>     I am already using QRPLabs TCXO BTW.
>
>     Waiting to perform the surgery on the ProgRock, then I will
>     analyze the
>     PSU too(didn't check it yet). Not much left to look at though.
>
>     I am building some GPIB interfaces to connect the frequency
>     counter and
>     log data programmatically, it will take 2-3weeks tough, waiting for
>     AR488 pcb to arrive.
>
>     Giuseppe Marullo
>     IW2JWW - JN45RQ
>
>
>
>
>