Date   

Re: Ultimate3s Power output

jakob@...
 

The cutoff frequency of the 20m LPF seems to be a bit at the lower side. I had a similar effect on 20m. As a first thing, I counted the windings on the toroids. I had one turn too much on both toroids at the ends. I run it currently at 1.41 Watt and an SWR of 1.11 with 3 transistors and a heatsink at 6 Volt on 40 meters. Check the map for AA0JR


Re: The Light APRS Reciever

Tim Wiwel
 

On the Lora front it could be used for command and control.  A friend has been using it for some time for HAB and has successfully received pictures from ~30km with 10mW Tx.  

On the LightAPRS front, the thing is great.  We are on our 6th lap now with a  LightAPRS-W,  Thanks Tan for all your help.   Sadly, I believe we have lost the balloon after 50+ days and 5 plus laps. 

KM4EFW

On Thu, Apr 2, 2020 at 3:23 PM Rob Striemer <rjstriemer@...> wrote:
For Greg's purpose of releasing the payload from the balloon using LightAPRS in a safe, accessible location, a geofence would be a useful feature.

I'm also a teacher that helps students with stratospheric HAB projects for atmospheric research. I have a LightAPRS but I have not been able to put it to use. It seems that the code is optimized for energy conservation which is not important for a short duration flight of 3 hours or so. Ideally we would like 2-m APRS transmissions at regular intervals, say every minute. I have had no luck so far. My unit transmits a few times at start-up then, I think, goes to sleep. I've worked with the various sketches supplied by QRPLabs on GitHub, in development mode without success. My programming skills are very basic. I would love a stripped down to the basics Arduino sketch for LightAPRS. That is a sketch without the energy conserving/sleep features. Maybe Mustafa has such a sketch and can post it to GitHub or someone else could? I think there is a lot of potential for LightAPRS with educators, especially science teachers.

Back to Greg's issue, a geofence sketch or a GNSS altitude/altimeter release sketch could be useful. I think a pressure altimeter would be too limiting, maybe check the datasheet on the BME. I don't think it would be too reliable above 12km or 40 000 feet. Another option would be a simple timer.

Stay home and stay well everyone.


Re: QCX-20 ... low output power (~1.5 W) #20m #qcx

K5DH
 

I bought an older (2017) used 20m QCX this week via a well-known amateur radio internet swap-shop venue.  Transmitter power output was barely 1.5 Watts.  I replaced C25 and C26 with mica caps, and adjusted the turn counts on L1, L2, and L3 exactly like Hans noted in the post above: 1 turn each off L1 and L2, and 2 turns off L3.  Power is now a little over 4 Watts! 

Thanks for the help, Hans! 

--
73/72,
Dean K5DH
20m and 40m QCX'es


Re: No clock w output

Giuseppe Marullo
 

Yeah,

flip a single bit(BITterfly effect(:

'S' = 01010011

'C' = 01000011

in an email and you could crash a site(Hans's one).

Everyone that does this error in this ML put our credit cards in compulsive purchase mode.

Be mercy and double check for this specific spelling error(or should I infer it is a lapsus?, LOL).

Giuseppe Marullo
IW2JWW - JN45RQ

On 4/1/2020 8:02 PM, burdogj@... wrote:
QCX not QSX....sorry.  I solder about as well as I spell.


Re: Pre-wound Toroids

Shirley Dulcey KE1L
 

I don't LOVE winding toroids, but I also don't mind it. At least not the ones that you're going to encounter in most ham kits: T37, T50, or T68 cores with reasonably flexible wire. The tiny sizes (T25 and smaller; Micrometals makes them all the way down to T5!) are a bit more of a pain because they're harder to get a grip on, and the huge ones like you might find in a power amplifier are typically used with thick, stiff wire.

But don't get me started on binocular core transformers. Those things are my nemesis. In most of the designs where I have encountered them, there doesn't seem to be enough room in the holes for all the turns to fit.

On Sat, Apr 4, 2020 at 6:40 PM Eric KE6US <eric.csuf@...> wrote:

Humor is a funny thing...

I thought it was funny for the same reason. Hams are grasping at straws trying to attract a generation for whom radio isn't magic at all.  9 year olds walk around with devices more powerful than the Apollo computers and talk to people all over the world on a routine basis. Introducing them to the one aspect of homebrewing that most hams hate seems ironic if not funny. I happen to enjoy winding toroids. It's relaxing and satisfying to me. But it's appeal is clearly not shared universally.

Eric KE6US

On 4/4/2020 2:06 PM, Tim and Janet wrote:
Well I suppose I am on the other side of this conversation.  I did find it funny.  When I read this I thought of my 3 kids not necessarily all kids.  No way would they want to wind toroids and I can hear them now finding excuses not to do it.  I agree it is a great way to introduce building projects but they must be willing participants.  My kids winding my toroids?  Now that is funny to me.

73
Tim
KB2MFS

On Sat, Apr 4, 2020 at 3:02 PM Don VE3IDS <ve3ids.don@...> wrote:
I'm with Arv and Colin as well. I don't see what's funny about kids learning to wind toroids and bring introduced to ham radio. The abundance of small affordable kits these days could help rekindle the old days of homebrew and heathkit at a much more affordable price point. Lots of kids have great fine motor skills, ie Lego robots builds and other science projects. I'm far from being a kid myself but I don't find toroids to be difficult. They make builds much easier these days to be able to make inductors and transformers of whatever values one might need with a few standardized parts. It used to be that you would have to try and find a specific choke or transformer and maybe special order it, now you can wind it up yourself. A decent magnifying glass or even a smartphone camera really helps older eyes. 
72 Don ve3ids

On Sat., Apr. 4, 2020, 3:18 p.m. Colin Evans M1BUU, <colin.evans2@...> wrote:
I'm with Arv, I don't see what's funny.
Getting kids involved with making toroids is a good idea. Winding a toroid is a fulfilling process, you can see instantly whether you've done a good job or not.

The path has been beaten before.....
http://www.qrpme.com/docs/Toroid%20Tool.pdf

73, Colin
M1BUU


Re: Pre-wound Toroids

Eric KE6US
 

Humor is a funny thing...

I thought it was funny for the same reason. Hams are grasping at straws trying to attract a generation for whom radio isn't magic at all.  9 year olds walk around with devices more powerful than the Apollo computers and talk to people all over the world on a routine basis. Introducing them to the one aspect of homebrewing that most hams hate seems ironic if not funny. I happen to enjoy winding toroids. It's relaxing and satisfying to me. But it's appeal is clearly not shared universally.

Eric KE6US

On 4/4/2020 2:06 PM, Tim and Janet wrote:

Well I suppose I am on the other side of this conversation.  I did find it funny.  When I read this I thought of my 3 kids not necessarily all kids.  No way would they want to wind toroids and I can hear them now finding excuses not to do it.  I agree it is a great way to introduce building projects but they must be willing participants.  My kids winding my toroids?  Now that is funny to me.

73
Tim
KB2MFS

On Sat, Apr 4, 2020 at 3:02 PM Don VE3IDS <ve3ids.don@...> wrote:
I'm with Arv and Colin as well. I don't see what's funny about kids learning to wind toroids and bring introduced to ham radio. The abundance of small affordable kits these days could help rekindle the old days of homebrew and heathkit at a much more affordable price point. Lots of kids have great fine motor skills, ie Lego robots builds and other science projects. I'm far from being a kid myself but I don't find toroids to be difficult. They make builds much easier these days to be able to make inductors and transformers of whatever values one might need with a few standardized parts. It used to be that you would have to try and find a specific choke or transformer and maybe special order it, now you can wind it up yourself. A decent magnifying glass or even a smartphone camera really helps older eyes. 
72 Don ve3ids

On Sat., Apr. 4, 2020, 3:18 p.m. Colin Evans M1BUU, <colin.evans2@...> wrote:
I'm with Arv, I don't see what's funny.
Getting kids involved with making toroids is a good idea. Winding a toroid is a fulfilling process, you can see instantly whether you've done a good job or not.

The path has been beaten before.....
http://www.qrpme.com/docs/Toroid%20Tool.pdf

73, Colin
M1BUU


Re: U3S remaining issues I have

Roger Hill
 

Sorry but you are wrong. Highest frequency goes in slot ONE. It is in the manual.

Roger
G3YTN

On 4 Apr 2020, at 17:50, dl2arl@... wrote:

Hello dear OM Andrew,
I humbly disagree with your opinion above. Out of my point of view, the LPFmodule for the highest frequency should go into the slot closest to the PA. Related to the numbering table above it should go into the slot #0 (Zero: on the main U3S. PCB) The module with the lowest frequency should go in my opinion into the slot #1 which is closest to the RF Output.

I am not sure if I am right, but quite.

Yours friendly, Razvan


Re: U3S remaining issues I have

DL2ARL
 

Hello dear OM Andrew,
I humbly disagree with your opinion above. Out of my point of view, the LPFmodule for the highest frequency should go into the slot closest to the PA. Related to the numbering table above it should go into the slot #0 (Zero: on the main U3S. PCB) The module with the lowest frequency should go in my opinion into the slot #1 which is closest to the RF Output.

I am not sure if I am right, but quite.

Yours friendly, Razvan


Re: Pre-wound Toroids

Tim and Janet
 

Well I suppose I am on the other side of this conversation.  I did find it funny.  When I read this I thought of my 3 kids not necessarily all kids.  No way would they want to wind toroids and I can hear them now finding excuses not to do it.  I agree it is a great way to introduce building projects but they must be willing participants.  My kids winding my toroids?  Now that is funny to me.

73
Tim
KB2MFS

On Sat, Apr 4, 2020 at 3:02 PM Don VE3IDS <ve3ids.don@...> wrote:
I'm with Arv and Colin as well. I don't see what's funny about kids learning to wind toroids and bring introduced to ham radio. The abundance of small affordable kits these days could help rekindle the old days of homebrew and heathkit at a much more affordable price point. Lots of kids have great fine motor skills, ie Lego robots builds and other science projects. I'm far from being a kid myself but I don't find toroids to be difficult. They make builds much easier these days to be able to make inductors and transformers of whatever values one might need with a few standardized parts. It used to be that you would have to try and find a specific choke or transformer and maybe special order it, now you can wind it up yourself. A decent magnifying glass or even a smartphone camera really helps older eyes. 
72 Don ve3ids

On Sat., Apr. 4, 2020, 3:18 p.m. Colin Evans M1BUU, <colin.evans2@...> wrote:
I'm with Arv, I don't see what's funny.
Getting kids involved with making toroids is a good idea. Winding a toroid is a fulfilling process, you can see instantly whether you've done a good job or not.

The path has been beaten before.....
http://www.qrpme.com/docs/Toroid%20Tool.pdf

73, Colin
M1BUU


Re: Pre-wound Toroids

 

On Sat, Apr 4, 2020 at 09:17 PM, James Daldry W4JED wrote:
Tempting. Not too bad a price for prime toroids, too.
60¢ per toroid and a tool to the end user IS good.

+1


"7.1 - Release of the Magic smoke" v 50W PA #magicsmoke #smoked

KN4ULD
 

This afternoon for your reading pleasure  bring you
"7.1 - Release of the Magic smoke"

A couple weeks ago went to do alignment and fuse on ps I used blew.  Set all side.  Yesterday thought about hooking it all up again.  Used another ps and spare power lead ... that lead got WARM enough to notice immediately.  Figured lead was too wimpy, needed to follow the advice as found in 7.2 paragraph one.

"Use THICK cables from power supply to the Amplifier, to avoid voltage drop."

Made a lead with THICKER cable. 

Got situated.

Jiffy Pop x 2 = Magic Smoke

I thought I was good all the way around and going to heat the ionosphere tonight.

I'm not in hurry to do anything with the unit at this time.  Go ahead and share your thoughts your own magic smoke adventures, or any other amusing mayhem.

Have a nice weekend.

73
KN4ULD


Re: Pre-wound Toroids

Richard Lawn
 

I really meant no offense by it can we just drop it! 

73s
Rick, W2JAZ



--
73
Rick, W2JAZ


Re: Ultimate3s Power output

Ed Kwik
 

You did check here:

https://www.qrp-labs.com/qcx/qcxtrouble

Ed

AB8DF

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Pre-wound Toroids

James Daldry W4JED
 

Tempting. Not too bad a price for prime toroids, too.

Jim

On 4/4/20 3:18 PM, Colin Evans M1BUU wrote:

I'm with Arv, I don't see what's funny.
Getting kids involved with making toroids is a good idea. Winding a toroid is a fulfilling process, you can see instantly whether you've done a good job or not.

The path has been beaten before.....
http://www.qrpme.com/docs/Toroid%20Tool.pdf

73, Colin
M1BUU


Re: #QCX40 Rev5 LCD contrast adjustment appears to cause massive current draw #qcx40

James Daldry W4JED
 

Hi, Paul

Here are my guesses:

(1) R65 is mis-marked, actually 0.3 ohms. Or the topside wire is touching something.

(2) There is a wire scrap wedged underneath R47

(3) There is a wire scrap wedged underneath the LCD socket

(4) The "blob" on the bottom of the board at the wiper of R47 may be just a little too big and is grounding to the foil surrounding it. Try wicking the connection so it has no "blob" (it will still connect in the via) and see if the ground goes away.

73

Jim W4JED

On 4/4/20 11:04 AM, Paul Burton wrote:
So I investigated a bit more on this. There definitely appears to be a
short somewhere but darned if I can figure out where it is. For example,
when I put my probes across R65, I get a dead short (maybe 0.2 ohms on
my meter), no matter what the position of R47. I tried measuring between
pins 1, 2, and 3 of the LCD (each permutation of those three), both with
and without the LCD board installed:

R47 turned to max (min resistance): pin 1-2/pin 1-3/pin 2-3: all 0.3 ohms

R47 turned to min (max resistance): pin 1-2: 2.8 K-ohms / pin 1-3: 0.2
ohms / pin 2-3: 2.8 K-ohms

I also did another thorough examination for solder bridges, re-flowed
some more joints, and even checked for unetched (or over-etched) traces
to the extent that I could.


On 4/3/20 7:07 AM, Alan G4ZFQ wrote:
Recent suggestions do not account for the fact that tuning the
contrast pot to max shorts out the 5V line.
Therefore the pot slider must be grounded.
Maybe a solder splash, too much solder or even a rogue board with a
tiny piece of unetched copper.
Or, any of the other suggestions that would result in the 5V line
being shorted to ground.

73 Alan G4ZFQ



Re: Pre-wound Toroids

Don VE3IDS
 

I'm with Arv and Colin as well. I don't see what's funny about kids learning to wind toroids and bring introduced to ham radio. The abundance of small affordable kits these days could help rekindle the old days of homebrew and heathkit at a much more affordable price point. Lots of kids have great fine motor skills, ie Lego robots builds and other science projects. I'm far from being a kid myself but I don't find toroids to be difficult. They make builds much easier these days to be able to make inductors and transformers of whatever values one might need with a few standardized parts. It used to be that you would have to try and find a specific choke or transformer and maybe special order it, now you can wind it up yourself. A decent magnifying glass or even a smartphone camera really helps older eyes. 
72 Don ve3ids

On Sat., Apr. 4, 2020, 3:18 p.m. Colin Evans M1BUU, <colin.evans2@...> wrote:
I'm with Arv, I don't see what's funny.
Getting kids involved with making toroids is a good idea. Winding a toroid is a fulfilling process, you can see instantly whether you've done a good job or not.

The path has been beaten before.....
http://www.qrpme.com/docs/Toroid%20Tool.pdf

73, Colin
M1BUU


Re: Pre-wound Toroids

Jim Mcilroy
 

Well, I was blessed(?) with four aunts and some of them decided to teach me cork knitting so they could get on with watching soap operas in peace.

It is not a million miles away from winding toroids.

On 04/04/2020 19:54, Richard Lawn wrote:

Introducing kids to ham radio is a great idea, but the thought of them winding toroids I found funny. 
--
73
Rick, W2JAZ


Re: Pre-wound Toroids

Colin Evans M1BUU
 

I'm with Arv, I don't see what's funny.
Getting kids involved with making toroids is a good idea. Winding a toroid is a fulfilling process, you can see instantly whether you've done a good job or not.

The path has been beaten before.....
http://www.qrpme.com/docs/Toroid%20Tool.pdf

73, Colin
M1BUU


Re: Pre-wound Toroids

Richard Lawn
 

Introducing kids to ham radio is a great idea, but the thought of them winding toroids I found funny. 
--
73
Rick, W2JAZ


Re: Ultimate3s Power output

Dave, G8PGO
 

Thanks Andy, will have a look for it. I seem to vaguely remember seeing the thread some time ago.

Hi Jakob, I'm getting about 0.5w on 20m and about 1w on 30m.

Thanks for the help guys.
Dave, G8PGO