Date   
How to Upload Files?

Al Clark
 

Folks,

How do I upload a file?  The Upload button is not working.
--
Al W4KY

QCX lives... again

Brien Pepperdine
 

Early this year I bought a used 40m QCX... nicely done with the German metal case.

But... it was an earlier model with the 10uf electrolytic caps in the audio filter chain... way to much keying click for me. So I left it as it was for the time being. Weeks later I made a journey to our local small shop selling electronics.. it serves the universities here for student and staff projects in engineering and tech need.

I got .1 and 1 uf caps.. as there were many suggestions on replacement value. I know that 1 uf is the recommended at this time.When I got the quiet time to remove the 10 uf caps and put in the 1 uf it sounded fine. UNTIL I got the replacements soldering in. NO audio. Hmmmm.. worked fine to this point. I left it for further pondering as summer wafted by.

So today I looked. Well, first thing.. of those two caps to be 1 uf.. one was a 473 marking... not 105. What! How did that happen?  So I put in a 105 ( I uf) cap. Still not working. I hear a very weak sidetone when keying though.

So... I get out Hans' manual on the computer (we all know how good it is). And I trace thru the CW filter and audio chain. Look for continuity etc. Not getting continuity from the wiper of the audio level pot and the leg of C22 that should be there. So I solder in a jumper from terminal 2 (wiper) of the audio pot and the leg of C23. All works! AND-------- NO KEY CLICKS!!!

So I think that last little bit of lead insertion, removal and replacement at the hole for C22 must have lost its connection to trace to the wiper. No problem, I will just put in a tidy permanent jumper and have a rig for the winter.

And as it happened.. while looking for SKCC contacts today I worked a guy who had just finished his 40m QCX and I was his first contact on the rig. His signal was just as good as any of the general 'average' signals on the band as well. Good for him.

73

Brian VE3VAW Toronto

Re: QRP Labs receiver performance #rcvr #polyphase

Ryan Flowers
 

I ordered mine last week, and am going to try it out with both the phasing module and with a Teensy per ZL2CTM:

http://zl2ctm.blogspot.com/2019/06/homebrew-804020m-ssb-sdr-phasing-rig.html


Ryan Flowers - W7RLF
The BITX40 FAQ

Re: More paddles and keys ...

Ken KM4NFQ
 

You are welcome Guido.

I used scrap cast brass for the posts and so forth.
You can substitute round stock or square bar to make the various posts.
My paddle weighs 3 pounds 15 and 3/4 ounces (1805 grams).
It does not move much when I am using it. ;-D

Regards,
Ken, KM4NFQ "Not Fully Qualified"
https://groups.io/g/w8bhMorseTutor


On Thu, Nov 21, 2019 at 4:09 PM Guido PE1NNZ <threeme3@...> wrote:
Hi Ken,

Many thanks for sharing this.

Think this is very impressive, and with the documentation you provided a great source of inspiration for building one.

I am quite NFQ if it comes down to building mechanical things, but I hope to make a start in building one too after having collected the materials and having gathered the right spirit of doing it.

73, Guido

Re: More paddles and keys ...

SkipF, NT1G <skip.flem@...>
 

Well...if you love the orange glow of filaments, (22?)
 I have something for you (from QST, Apr.'55).
 And no, it's not the april joke...
  Total article is 12 pages...
available on 'Reply to Sender' request.

Re: New QCX and introduction

jjpurdum
 

It also makes the "regular" and Farnsworth spacing speeds very evident and you can change them on the fly.

Jack, W8TEE

On Thursday, November 21, 2019, 3:14:58 PM EST, Jon Reck W8REA <jreck@...> wrote:


As a former G4FON user, I recommend 'Just Learn Morse Code' http://www.justlearnmorsecode.com/
It is a very similar PC based program, but much better at evaluating your errors.

Jon W8REA

Re: More paddles and keys ...

Guido PE1NNZ
 

Hi Ken,

Many thanks for sharing this.

Think this is very impressive, and with the documentation you provided a great source of inspiration for building one.

I am quite NFQ if it comes down to building mechanical things, but I hope to make a start in building one too after having collected the materials and having gathered the right spirit of doing it.

73, Guido

Re: New QCX and introduction

jjpurdum
 

Agree 100%. I've been continually licensed since 1954 and I remember getting my General and saying I'd NEVER use CW again. I pretty much didn't until I retired about 10 years ago. Then I found QRP and how much enjoyment I got out of that and bought a little 5W CW transceiver kit and, from that point on, I was doomed! There was a lot of rust to work off, and I'm still working on it somewhat. When this latest project is done, I hope to go full bore on my code speed then.

If you don't know CW, please give it a try. I really think you'll like it!

Jack, W8TEE

On Thursday, November 21, 2019, 3:38:22 PM EST, Eric KE6US <eric.csuf@...> wrote:


Let me tell you a little secret. Lots of guys on this forum go back many decades in ham radio. 62 years for me. We started before home computers and cell phones were even possible. Radio was magic to us then. It's still magic. It doesn't seem to be magic to many younger people now, but it is to some. You might be one of those who still see the magic. I think CW helps with keeping it somewhat magical.

I concur on two other points already made. The Koch method used by G4FON is an excellent idea and it works. It helps you learn the sound of the characters instead of the "dot dash" makeup of them. That's really important. I also agree with learning to "head copy" the code. Don't write it down. You will thank yourself later. There are advocates for head copy, pencil/paper and using a mill. I've needed all three over the years. They are DIFFERENT SKILLS that use different parts of the brain. One is not generally better than the other, but skill in one doesn't give you much skill in the other. If it did, experienced hams wouldn't have so much trouble trying to learn to head copy.

Personally, I think head copy is best for casual communication--the kind we mostly do on the air. You jot down a few key things, name, qth, RST. Or not. The other methods are more important where you must get the message correct--letter perfect. That's why mills were invented. They're typewriters with all uppercase so you don't have to waste time and energy shifting. See any Telegram in a movie. They're all uppercase.

So learn to head copy. Later develop your code writing or typing skills IF you need them. Otherwise, just build speed with head copy and enjoy a skill most hams don't have.

Welcome to the magic show.

Eric KE6US



On 11/21/2019 11:00 AM, Jon wrote:
I recently joined this group after completing my QCX for 40 meters.  I have had a Technician license for 10+ years that I obtained so I could run a kit built radio for the radio controlled airplane hobby.  Only in the last few months have I decided to try using my ticket for actual Ham Radio Ops <grin>.

I have an end fed half wave antenna that I built using the "No Tune EFWH" kit from QRP Guys.  My QTH is in Central Texas and have been able to listen to W1AW and have seen transmissions from callsigns from California, Montana,  Alabama, Cuba.  That is probably old hat to most of you guys but it is a real kick for me as a beginner.  I am still working to learn CW (know about half of the alphabet so far) so I am dependent on the decoder to understand what is being sent.

I have questions about using the QCX, antennas, and CW ops in general.  Are more general questions okay here?

73,

Jon KE5URU

Fw: [QRPLabs] CQ WW DX CW 2019

Bob Macklin
 

 
---
New Outlook Express and Windows Live Mail replacement - get it here:
 
I'm going to listen to the CQ WW DX contest with my Heathkit HR-1680 and do
the logging with DX Lab.

The HR-1680 does not have CAT! It has an ANALOG VFO with a large tuning
knob! It's a very good receiver with NO FEATURES!

Bob Macklin
K5MYJ
Seattle, Wa.
"Real Radios Glow In The Dark"

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bill Cromwell" <wrcromwell@...>
To: <QRPLabs@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 21, 2019 8:31 AM
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] CQ WW DX CW 2019


> Hi,
>
> What prevents contestants using QCX from typing the frequency as displayed
> on the QCX into the computer log?
>
> 73,
>
> Bill  KU8H
>
> On 11/21/19 12:30 AM, Andy wrote:
>> Hi Andy RW9RN,
>>
>> Good luck in CQ WW CW contest, have a fun :)
>>
>> Rules for CQ WW contests are clear:...Stations competing for World and
>> Continent awards must provide actual frequencies for all contacts in the
>> log.
>>
>> Unfortunately, last two years no news about QCX CAT control :( and this
>> make QCX not best choice for big CW contests.
>>
>> 73,
>>
>> Andy UA9C../9A3JH
>>
>>
>>
>> .
>>
>
> --
> bark less - wag more
>
>
>
>

Re: New QCX and introduction

jjpurdum
 

My original Morse Code Tutor (FDIM, 2019) also has Farnsworth spacing. Regardless of the hardware, practice is key.

Jack, W8TEE

On Thursday, November 21, 2019, 3:53:14 PM EST, Ken KM4NFQ <km4nfq@...> wrote:


There is a program called Wordsworth that is supposed to help with Head Copy.

The W8BH Morse Tutor has a Koch Method feature, and you can set Farnsworth timing and Word delay (spacing) in the Config > Speed menu setting. See: http://w8bh.net/  Arduino Projects > Morse Tutor.

Regards,
Ken, KM4NFQ "Not Fully Qualified"
https://groups.io/g/w8bhMorseTutor


On Thu, Nov 21, 2019 at 3:38 PM Eric KE6US <eric.csuf@...> wrote:

Let me tell you a little secret. Lots of guys on this forum go back many decades in ham radio. 62 years for me. We started before home computers and cell phones were even possible. Radio was magic to us then. It's still magic. It doesn't seem to be magic to many younger people now, but it is to some. You might be one of those who still see the magic. I think CW helps with keeping it somewhat magical.

I concur on two other points already made. The Koch method used by G4FON is an excellent idea and it works. It helps you learn the sound of the characters instead of the "dot dash" makeup of them. That's really important. I also agree with learning to "head copy" the code. Don't write it down. You will thank yourself later. There are advocates for head copy, pencil/paper and using a mill. I've needed all three over the years. They are DIFFERENT SKILLS that use different parts of the brain. One is not generally better than the other, but skill in one doesn't give you much skill in the other. If it did, experienced hams wouldn't have so much trouble trying to learn to head copy.

Personally, I think head copy is best for casual communication--the kind we mostly do on the air. You jot down a few key things, name, qth, RST. Or not. The other methods are more important where you must get the message correct--letter perfect. That's why mills were invented. They're typewriters with all uppercase so you don't have to waste time and energy shifting. See any Telegram in a movie. They're all uppercase.

So learn to head copy. Later develop your code writing or typing skills IF you need them. Otherwise, just build speed with head copy and enjoy a skill most hams don't have.

Welcome to the magic show.

Eric KE6US



On 11/21/2019 11:00 AM, Jon wrote:
I recently joined this group after completing my QCX for 40 meters.  I have had a Technician license for 10+ years that I obtained so I could run a kit built radio for the radio controlled airplane hobby.  Only in the last few months have I decided to try using my ticket for actual Ham Radio Ops <grin>.

I have an end fed half wave antenna that I built using the "No Tune EFWH" kit from QRP Guys.  My QTH is in Central Texas and have been able to listen to W1AW and have seen transmissions from callsigns from California, Montana,  Alabama, Cuba.  That is probably old hat to most of you guys but it is a real kick for me as a beginner.  I am still working to learn CW (know about half of the alphabet so far) so I am dependent on the decoder to understand what is being sent.

I have questions about using the QCX, antennas, and CW ops in general.  Are more general questions okay here?

73,

Jon KE5URU

Re: New QCX and introduction

Ken KM4NFQ
 

There is a program called Wordsworth that is supposed to help with Head Copy.

The W8BH Morse Tutor has a Koch Method feature, and you can set Farnsworth timing and Word delay (spacing) in the Config > Speed menu setting. See: http://w8bh.net/  Arduino Projects > Morse Tutor.

Regards,
Ken, KM4NFQ "Not Fully Qualified"
https://groups.io/g/w8bhMorseTutor


On Thu, Nov 21, 2019 at 3:38 PM Eric KE6US <eric.csuf@...> wrote:

Let me tell you a little secret. Lots of guys on this forum go back many decades in ham radio. 62 years for me. We started before home computers and cell phones were even possible. Radio was magic to us then. It's still magic. It doesn't seem to be magic to many younger people now, but it is to some. You might be one of those who still see the magic. I think CW helps with keeping it somewhat magical.

I concur on two other points already made. The Koch method used by G4FON is an excellent idea and it works. It helps you learn the sound of the characters instead of the "dot dash" makeup of them. That's really important. I also agree with learning to "head copy" the code. Don't write it down. You will thank yourself later. There are advocates for head copy, pencil/paper and using a mill. I've needed all three over the years. They are DIFFERENT SKILLS that use different parts of the brain. One is not generally better than the other, but skill in one doesn't give you much skill in the other. If it did, experienced hams wouldn't have so much trouble trying to learn to head copy.

Personally, I think head copy is best for casual communication--the kind we mostly do on the air. You jot down a few key things, name, qth, RST. Or not. The other methods are more important where you must get the message correct--letter perfect. That's why mills were invented. They're typewriters with all uppercase so you don't have to waste time and energy shifting. See any Telegram in a movie. They're all uppercase.

So learn to head copy. Later develop your code writing or typing skills IF you need them. Otherwise, just build speed with head copy and enjoy a skill most hams don't have.

Welcome to the magic show.

Eric KE6US



On 11/21/2019 11:00 AM, Jon wrote:
I recently joined this group after completing my QCX for 40 meters.  I have had a Technician license for 10+ years that I obtained so I could run a kit built radio for the radio controlled airplane hobby.  Only in the last few months have I decided to try using my ticket for actual Ham Radio Ops <grin>.

I have an end fed half wave antenna that I built using the "No Tune EFWH" kit from QRP Guys.  My QTH is in Central Texas and have been able to listen to W1AW and have seen transmissions from callsigns from California, Montana,  Alabama, Cuba.  That is probably old hat to most of you guys but it is a real kick for me as a beginner.  I am still working to learn CW (know about half of the alphabet so far) so I am dependent on the decoder to understand what is being sent.

I have questions about using the QCX, antennas, and CW ops in general.  Are more general questions okay here?

73,

Jon KE5URU

Re: New QCX and introduction

Eric KE6US
 

Let me tell you a little secret. Lots of guys on this forum go back many decades in ham radio. 62 years for me. We started before home computers and cell phones were even possible. Radio was magic to us then. It's still magic. It doesn't seem to be magic to many younger people now, but it is to some. You might be one of those who still see the magic. I think CW helps with keeping it somewhat magical.

I concur on two other points already made. The Koch method used by G4FON is an excellent idea and it works. It helps you learn the sound of the characters instead of the "dot dash" makeup of them. That's really important. I also agree with learning to "head copy" the code. Don't write it down. You will thank yourself later. There are advocates for head copy, pencil/paper and using a mill. I've needed all three over the years. They are DIFFERENT SKILLS that use different parts of the brain. One is not generally better than the other, but skill in one doesn't give you much skill in the other. If it did, experienced hams wouldn't have so much trouble trying to learn to head copy.

Personally, I think head copy is best for casual communication--the kind we mostly do on the air. You jot down a few key things, name, qth, RST. Or not. The other methods are more important where you must get the message correct--letter perfect. That's why mills were invented. They're typewriters with all uppercase so you don't have to waste time and energy shifting. See any Telegram in a movie. They're all uppercase.

So learn to head copy. Later develop your code writing or typing skills IF you need them. Otherwise, just build speed with head copy and enjoy a skill most hams don't have.

Welcome to the magic show.

Eric KE6US



On 11/21/2019 11:00 AM, Jon wrote:
I recently joined this group after completing my QCX for 40 meters.  I have had a Technician license for 10+ years that I obtained so I could run a kit built radio for the radio controlled airplane hobby.  Only in the last few months have I decided to try using my ticket for actual Ham Radio Ops <grin>.

I have an end fed half wave antenna that I built using the "No Tune EFWH" kit from QRP Guys.  My QTH is in Central Texas and have been able to listen to W1AW and have seen transmissions from callsigns from California, Montana,  Alabama, Cuba.  That is probably old hat to most of you guys but it is a real kick for me as a beginner.  I am still working to learn CW (know about half of the alphabet so far) so I am dependent on the decoder to understand what is being sent.

I have questions about using the QCX, antennas, and CW ops in general.  Are more general questions okay here?

73,

Jon KE5URU

Re: #qcx CAT control #qcx

Hans Summers
 

Hi all

I have implemented all these CAT commands now in a beta version which I have named 1.03z (suffixes starting at z and counting down, are my way of indicating betas). 

This beta is here:

This beta implements the following CAT commands suggested by Andy UA9/9A3JH:

FA: Get/set VFO A
FB: Get/set VFO B
FR: Get Transmit VFO Mode: 0 = VFO A; 1 = VFO B
FT: Get Receive VFO Mode: 0 = VFO A; 1 = VFO B
FW: Get filter bandwidth
ID: Get radio ID: 020 (Kenwood TS-480)
IF: Get transceiver information
MD: Get operating mode; always returns 3 (CW)
RT: Get RIT status: 0 = RIT off, 1 = RIT on
TQ: Get transmit state: 0 = RX, 1 = TX

Only FA and FB are able to SET the VFO A/B parameters respectively; the other commands are all read-only (GET). 

These were implemented according to the Kenwood TS-480 specification here: https://www.kenwood.com/i/products/info/amateur/ts_480/pdf/ts_480_pc.pdf and I have also checked the Elecraft K2 specification Andy supplied https://ftp.elecraft.com/K2/Manuals%20Downloads/KIO2%20Pgmrs%20Ref%20rev%20E.pdf , the commands and responses are practically the same, for this subset. 

I tested using a terminal emulator (Putty) and all appears to me, to be working as it should be. But I have not tested with an actual LOG program. I have never used one! Here I still use paper! See attached. Yes one day I will drag myself into the 21st century. 

Attached is also a diagram "connections.png" showing the connections from the QCX to the USB-to-serial converter I am using. Baud rate is set at 9600 baud. I assume logging programs can choose the baud rate to match the radio? The ATmega328's USART peripheral is used and this is on IC2 pins 2 and 3, which are already occupied by LCD signals D4 and D5. Therefore I have to switch off the USART for a few microseconds every time the LCD is updated. 

I have put 330-ohm resistors in series with the signals from the LCD so that the TX signal from the USB-to-serial converter does not fight too badly with IC2 pin 2 when pin 2 is writing to the LCD. Furthermore, I put another 330-ohm resistor in the TX signal, and I added a diode from the "DVM" bus signal, which is IC2 Pin 25. During LCD write, I have set this signal HIGH so that the TX signal provided to the PC is forced "idle"; this prevents the PC from receiving any nonsense characters. 

Note that if you really want to use the QCX's DVM and RF Power measurement facilities in the test equipment menus 9.1 and 9.2 respectively, then you should not connect this diode to IC2 pin 25, because it *could* alter the measurement when the LCD is updated. Also, when you have the QCX in menus 9.1 and 9.2, it no longer sets the DVM signal high during LCD write; this avoids potential interference with the analog measurements but then does allow spurious characters to reach the PC via the serial data connection. Moral of the story is that if you want to use CAT, don't try to use DVM and RF Power measurement. Something had to give, somewhere. 

A couple of other implementation details in case someone who knows CAT better than I do (which is to say, everyone) can see any issues. I have created a 32-character circular buffer. An interrupt handler fires whenever a character is received from the USART. The interrupt handler adds the character into the circular buffer. When a ';' character is seen (CAT command terminating character) a message is sent from the interrupt handler to the main processing loop, which then calls a function to handle the CAT command. This function returns the requested information to the PC via the serial port. As normal with circular buffers, characters are added at a head position, and removed from a tail position. I do not know if PC software using CAT is likely to execute multiple commands before receiving the response from existing commands sent, or if they only send a new command when the existing one has returned its result. Either way, the system should handle it fine, within reasonable limitations that the 32-character circular buffer should not be filled up (i.e. the head should not meet the tail). I can't type characters fast enough in a terminal to simulate this for example FA;FB;IF; typed so fast that the QCX receives them all before it has a chance to answer. Anyway, just saying. 

The other thing I have had to TEMPORARILY do is comment out some code in the WSPR encoding functions. This is to free up some flash memory space to fit all the code that now handles CAT. Therefore in this beta firmware 1.03z version, the WSPR beacon mode will NOT work properly. I will fix this - but it is going to involve me SQUEEZING a lot of code to try to make enough space so that it all fits in 32K memory again. That's a non-trivial job and it is past 11:30pm here, which means past my bedtime, and my brain is fried and my XYL is neglected. Therefore I shall leave that task for another day. 

Someone please try this 1.03z beta and hook up a serial connection to a PC, and try logging software with it... and let me know, is it now ready for CQ WW DX CW 2019? There are still a little over 27 hours before the contest starts!

73 Hans G0UPL


On Thu, Nov 21, 2019 at 6:43 PM Joe Street <racingtheclouds@...> wrote:
Wow my QCX will be able to talk to my magloop controller.  Wonders never cease here!

Shine on you crazy diamonds.
Joe

On Thu, Nov 21, 2019 at 10:35 AM <jmh6@...> wrote:

Hi Hans :),

    Nice. Can't wait to try it :).

    Lots of fun :).


On Thu, 21 Nov 2019, Hans Summers wrote:

> Hi Andy, Andy
> I can make the firmware change. It only needs a sure answer to these three questions and particularly, someone(s) to test. The coding was not complex and the risk of
> unwanted side effects should be very low. 
>
> 73 Hans G0UPL 
> http://qrp-labs.com 
>
>
> On Thu, Nov 21, 2019, 14:59 Andy V. Borisenko via Groups.Io <rw9rn=mail.ru@groups.io> wrote:
>       We Russians have a saying:
> ?Horses do not change at the crossroads.?
> This suggests that you can not make changes to the equipment and programs before the contest!
> If something goes wrong, you can skip the competition.
> This is my rule, which I have been following for many years.
>
>
>
>



Re: New QCX and introduction

G4GIR
 

Thanks Jack, interesting.
 
72/73
 
    Ian  G4GIR
 

From: Gary Bernard via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, November 21, 2019 7:51 PM
To: QRPLabs@groups.io
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] New QCX and introduction
 
Jack has hit the nail on the head!
Gary W0CKI


-----Original Message-----
From: jjpurdum via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...>
To: QRPLabs <QRPLabs@groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Nov 21, 2019 12:47 pm
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] New QCX and introduction

That's the way I learned, and I peaked out at about 18wpm. Also, I think you tend to count dits and dahs more when you use a pencil...not good. For those who can type, I think that's probably okay, since a lot of people can type at 60wpm. Also, the real goal is to listen to the rhythm of the code. For example, if someone sends "BEEN" or "BEST", I will hear that no matter what because I like their rhythm. Proficient CW operators (e.g., > 30wpm) never seem to use paper. They hear word rhythms where I still hear dits and dahs. I'm working on it, but it takes a lot of practice. Our club president can copy about 40wpm...he sits there with his eyes closed reading the code on the back of his eyelids...and he's almost always smiling. Most of us know the "word rhythm" for CQ. Imagine having that for every word! I really hope to get to 30WPM before all the sand runs out of my hourglass.
 
Jack, W8TEE
 
On Thursday, November 21, 2019, 2:36:14 PM EST, G4GIR via Groups.Io <i.frith@...> wrote:
 
 
Hello Jack
Not to detract from the thread of the topic, but Interested to know why you would advocate not using pencil and paper?
 
72/73
 
Ian G4GIR
Sent: Thursday, November 21, 2019 7:20 PM
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] New QCX and introduction
 
Check out G4FON (http://www.g4fon.net/) for a good PC-based CW learning program. Practice is key and try not to use pencil and paper.
 
Jack, W8TEE
 
 
 
 
On Thursday, November 21, 2019, 2:04:02 PM EST, Jon <7xsuazlhhtls@...> wrote:
 
 
I recently joined this group after completing my QCX for 40 meters.  I have had a Technician license for 10+ years that I obtained so I could run a kit built radio for the radio controlled airplane hobby.  Only in the last few months have I decided to try using my ticket for actual Ham Radio Ops <grin>.

I have an end fed half wave antenna that I built using the "No Tune EFWH" kit from QRP Guys.  My QTH is in Central Texas and have been able to listen to W1AW and have seen transmissions from callsigns from California, Montana,  Alabama, Cuba.  That is probably old hat to most of you guys but it is a real kick for me as a beginner.  I am still working to learn CW (know about half of the alphabet so far) so I am dependent on the decoder to understand what is being sent.

I have questions about using the QCX, antennas, and CW ops in general.  Are more general questions okay here?

73,

Jon KE5URU

Re: New QCX and introduction

Jon Reck W8REA
 

As a former G4FON user, I recommend 'Just Learn Morse Code' http://www.justlearnmorsecode.com/
It is a very similar PC based program, but much better at evaluating your errors.

Jon W8REA

Re: More paddles and keys ...

Ken KM4NFQ
 

Greetings,



I have put PDFs on Google Drive with all my diagrams that I drew and work-in progress snapshots that I took while making my DIY Dual Lever Paddle:

Regards,
Ken, KM4NFQ "Not Fully Qualified"
https://groups.io/g/w8bhMorseTutor

On Mon, Nov 18, 2019 at 1:02 PM Chris Wilson <chris@...> wrote:
Hello Ken,

 Tuesday, November 12, 2019

 A thing of beauty, although it deserves to be connected to vintage valves (tubes) not semiconductors! You can never have too much brass :)


Best regards,
 Chris    2E0ILY       
mailto:chris@...

Re: New QCX and introduction

Gary Bernard
 

Jack has hit the nail on the head!
Gary W0CKI


-----Original Message-----
From: jjpurdum via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...>
To: QRPLabs <QRPLabs@groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Nov 21, 2019 12:47 pm
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] New QCX and introduction

That's the way I learned, and I peaked out at about 18wpm. Also, I think you tend to count dits and dahs more when you use a pencil...not good. For those who can type, I think that's probably okay, since a lot of people can type at 60wpm. Also, the real goal is to listen to the rhythm of the code. For example, if someone sends "BEEN" or "BEST", I will hear that no matter what because I like their rhythm. Proficient CW operators (e.g., > 30wpm) never seem to use paper. They hear word rhythms where I still hear dits and dahs. I'm working on it, but it takes a lot of practice. Our club president can copy about 40wpm...he sits there with his eyes closed reading the code on the back of his eyelids...and he's almost always smiling. Most of us know the "word rhythm" for CQ. Imagine having that for every word! I really hope to get to 30WPM before all the sand runs out of my hourglass.

Jack, W8TEE

On Thursday, November 21, 2019, 2:36:14 PM EST, G4GIR via Groups.Io <i.frith@...> wrote:


Hello Jack
Not to detract from the thread of the topic, but Interested to know why you would advocate not using pencil and paper?
 
72/73
 
Ian G4GIR
Sent: Thursday, November 21, 2019 7:20 PM
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] New QCX and introduction
 
Check out G4FON (http://www.g4fon.net/) for a good PC-based CW learning program. Practice is key and try not to use pencil and paper.
 
Jack, W8TEE
 
 
 
 
On Thursday, November 21, 2019, 2:04:02 PM EST, Jon <7xsuazlhhtls@...> wrote:
 
 
I recently joined this group after completing my QCX for 40 meters.  I have had a Technician license for 10+ years that I obtained so I could run a kit built radio for the radio controlled airplane hobby.  Only in the last few months have I decided to try using my ticket for actual Ham Radio Ops <grin>.

I have an end fed half wave antenna that I built using the "No Tune EFWH" kit from QRP Guys.  My QTH is in Central Texas and have been able to listen to W1AW and have seen transmissions from callsigns from California, Montana,  Alabama, Cuba.  That is probably old hat to most of you guys but it is a real kick for me as a beginner.  I am still working to learn CW (know about half of the alphabet so far) so I am dependent on the decoder to understand what is being sent.

I have questions about using the QCX, antennas, and CW ops in general.  Are more general questions okay here?

73,

Jon KE5URU

Re: New QCX and introduction

Gary Bernard
 

Once upon a time, long ago I used paper and pencil to copy CW. Now, having grown old I can't write fast enough, RX for 18 WPM or more, so know I'm learning to copy in my head, word groups. It works!
73 Gary W0CKI


-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Macklin <macklinbob@...>
To: QRPLabs@groups.io <QRPLabs@groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Nov 21, 2019 12:40 pm
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] New QCX and introduction

In the military intercept operator were trained type the inoming CW on a MILL!
 
They never used a pencil/pen and paper.
 
Airborn operators did use a pencl/pen to write orders in their log. Airborn (liason) operators sent very little. In some aircraft they were also GUNNERS.
 
Bob Macklin
S/SGT USAF (Ret)
 
---
New Outlook Express and Windows Live Mail replacement - get it here:
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From: jjpurdum via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...>
Reply-To: <QRPLabs@groups.io>
Sent: 11/21/2019 11:20:20 AM
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] New QCX and introduction

Check out G4FON (http://www.g4fon.net/) for a good PC-based CW learning program. Practice is key and try not to use pencil and paper.

Jack, W8TEE




On Thursday, November 21, 2019, 2:04:02 PM EST, Jon <7xsuazlhhtls@...> wrote:


I recently joined this group after completing my QCX for 40 meters.  I have had a Technician license for 10+ years that I obtained so I could run a kit built radio for the radio controlled airplane hobby.  Only in the last few months have I decided to try using my ticket for actual Ham Radio Ops <grin>.

I have an end fed half wave antenna that I built using the "No Tune EFWH" kit from QRP Guys.  My QTH is in Central Texas and have been able to listen to W1AW and have seen transmissions from callsigns from California, Montana,  Alabama, Cuba.  That is probably old hat to most of you guys but it is a real kick for me as a beginner.  I am still working to learn CW (know about half of the alphabet so far) so I am dependent on the decoder to understand what is being sent.

I have questions about using the QCX, antennas, and CW ops in general.  Are more general questions okay here?

73,

Jon KE5URU

Re: New QCX and introduction

jjpurdum
 

That's the way I learned, and I peaked out at about 18wpm. Also, I think you tend to count dits and dahs more when you use a pencil...not good. For those who can type, I think that's probably okay, since a lot of people can type at 60wpm. Also, the real goal is to listen to the rhythm of the code. For example, if someone sends "BEEN" or "BEST", I will hear that no matter what because I like their rhythm. Proficient CW operators (e.g., > 30wpm) never seem to use paper. They hear word rhythms where I still hear dits and dahs. I'm working on it, but it takes a lot of practice. Our club president can copy about 40wpm...he sits there with his eyes closed reading the code on the back of his eyelids...and he's almost always smiling. Most of us know the "word rhythm" for CQ. Imagine having that for every word! I really hope to get to 30WPM before all the sand runs out of my hourglass.

Jack, W8TEE

On Thursday, November 21, 2019, 2:36:14 PM EST, G4GIR via Groups.Io <i.frith@...> wrote:


Hello Jack
Not to detract from the thread of the topic, but Interested to know why you would advocate not using pencil and paper?
 
72/73
 
Ian G4GIR
From: jjpurdum via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, November 21, 2019 7:20 PM
To: QRPLabs@groups.io
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] New QCX and introduction
 
Check out G4FON (http://www.g4fon.net/) for a good PC-based CW learning program. Practice is key and try not to use pencil and paper.
 
Jack, W8TEE
 
 
 
 
On Thursday, November 21, 2019, 2:04:02 PM EST, Jon <7xsuazlhhtls@...> wrote:
 
 
I recently joined this group after completing my QCX for 40 meters.  I have had a Technician license for 10+ years that I obtained so I could run a kit built radio for the radio controlled airplane hobby.  Only in the last few months have I decided to try using my ticket for actual Ham Radio Ops <grin>.

I have an end fed half wave antenna that I built using the "No Tune EFWH" kit from QRP Guys.  My QTH is in Central Texas and have been able to listen to W1AW and have seen transmissions from callsigns from California, Montana,  Alabama, Cuba.  That is probably old hat to most of you guys but it is a real kick for me as a beginner.  I am still working to learn CW (know about half of the alphabet so far) so I am dependent on the decoder to understand what is being sent.

I have questions about using the QCX, antennas, and CW ops in general.  Are more general questions okay here?

73,

Jon KE5URU

Re: New QCX and introduction

Bob Macklin
 

In the military intercept operator were trained type the inoming CW on a MILL!
 
They never used a pencil/pen and paper.
 
Airborn operators did use a pencl/pen to write orders in their log. Airborn (liason) operators sent very little. In some aircraft they were also GUNNERS.
 
Bob Macklin
S/SGT USAF (Ret)
 
---
New Outlook Express and Windows Live Mail replacement - get it here:
 
 

----- Original Message -----
From: jjpurdum via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...>
Reply-To: <QRPLabs@groups.io>
Sent: 11/21/2019 11:20:20 AM
Subject: Re: [QRPLabs] New QCX and introduction

Check out G4FON (http://www.g4fon.net/) for a good PC-based CW learning program. Practice is key and try not to use pencil and paper.

Jack, W8TEE




On Thursday, November 21, 2019, 2:04:02 PM EST, Jon <7xsuazlhhtls@...> wrote:


I recently joined this group after completing my QCX for 40 meters.  I have had a Technician license for 10+ years that I obtained so I could run a kit built radio for the radio controlled airplane hobby.  Only in the last few months have I decided to try using my ticket for actual Ham Radio Ops <grin>.

I have an end fed half wave antenna that I built using the "No Tune EFWH" kit from QRP Guys.  My QTH is in Central Texas and have been able to listen to W1AW and have seen transmissions from callsigns from California, Montana,  Alabama, Cuba.  That is probably old hat to most of you guys but it is a real kick for me as a beginner.  I am still working to learn CW (know about half of the alphabet so far) so I am dependent on the decoder to understand what is being sent.

I have questions about using the QCX, antennas, and CW ops in general.  Are more general questions okay here?

73,

Jon KE5URU