Date   
Re: Error no WSPR map #wspr

jjpurdum
 

It could be that Google now requires the payment of a fee for any app that interfaces with Google Maps. If you're having issues and it's a web app, try running it in the Google Chrome browser. I've found some apps run under Chrome, but not other browsers (e.g., Firefox, Explorer).

I've quit using anything that is Google-branded, mainly because they sell your information. Their gmail also gives them the right to read and distribute the content of your emails. If you're doing consulting with NDA's, you shouldn't be using Google. I'm now using DuckDuckGo for all my searches and I can't see any difference, other than if I do a political search, the results aren't skewed towards a liberal viewpoint.

Jack, W8TEE


On Wednesday, October 2, 2019, 8:59:50 AM EDT, Roger Hill <rhill@...> wrote:


Me too.

Roger

On 2 Oct 2019, at 13:11, Mike Berg <mikeberg@...> wrote:

Since yesterday I keep getting an error message after the Google map disappears when loading WSPR net maps.

Is this issue on my end or does it affect everyone?

73  Mike N0QBH

Re: Error no WSPR map #wspr

Roger Hill
 

Me too.

Roger

On 2 Oct 2019, at 13:11, Mike Berg <mikeberg@...> wrote:

Since yesterday I keep getting an error message after the Google map disappears when loading WSPR net maps.

Is this issue on my end or does it affect everyone?

73  Mike N0QBH

Re: Error no WSPR map #wspr

Andy Brilleaux <punkbiscuit@...>
 

Sshhh don't mention WSPRNET.ORG on here, the topic police will get you ;-)

73 de Andy

Re: Error no WSPR map #wspr

John Canfield
 

Same thing here:

Oops! Something went wrong.
This page didn't load Google Maps correctly. See the JavaScript console for technical details.

--
John, WB5THT

Error no WSPR map #wspr

Mike Berg
 

Since yesterday I keep getting an error message after the Google map disappears when loading WSPR net maps.

Is this issue on my end or does it affect everyone?

73  Mike N0QBH

Re: Delivery of qcx OT

Don--AE4DW
 

On Sat, Sep 28, 2019 at 10:24 AM, _Dave_K0MBT wrote:
The post office has been playing a cruel joke trying to get me a QCX radio. 

It has been bouncing around on the east side of the country. Starting in NY, went to Alabama and now back up to Virginia. No move into the midwest to us in Missouri. 
Not a QRP Labs problem probably. Although it makes me wonder if the address is correct and/or  not mutilated. 
--
73
Dave
k0mbt
Ham_Made_Keys

Just 47 states to go for WAS.... :)

Hopefully it gets to you soon if it hasn't already arrived.

 

Re: #qcx Si5351A Phase noise measurements #qcx

Hans Summers
 

Thanks Richard, 

I just fixed it!

73 Hans G0UPL

On Wed, Oct 2, 2019 at 12:43 PM Richard G4TGJ <rpt@...> wrote:
Hi Hans
A very interesting article.

In the section "Heavy loading at 50-ohm" the photo is missing. It just says "{gallery}qcx/phasenoise/13/gallery}".
--
73
Richard
G4TGJ

Re: #qcx Si5351A Phase noise measurements #qcx

Richard G4TGJ
 

Hi Hans
A very interesting article.

In the section "Heavy loading at 50-ohm" the photo is missing. It just says "{gallery}qcx/phasenoise/13/gallery}".
--
73
Richard
G4TGJ

#qcx Si5351A Phase noise measurements #qcx

Hans Summers
 

Hi all


I have published an article on phase noise measurement techniques and in particular, relating to the phase noise of the Si5351A in the QCX. Having developed the equipment and skill to make this measurement is also expected to be very useful for final performance testing of the forthcoming QSX transceiver. 

I am grateful to Kevin ZL1UJG and the 100+ correspondence emails we had on this topic; some information from Kevin is also presented on the page and agrees with my conclusions. I had always feared phase noise measurement and thought it out of reach of mere mortals such as myself but was pleasantly surprised; to be sure it isn't trivial but neither is it as difficult as I had feared ;-) 

The QCX phase noise performance was found to be GOOD, and my measurement matched ARRL to within 1dB in their QST August 2019 review (ARRL measured -135 dBc/Hz at the transmitter output, at 10 kHz and 50 kHz spacing). The review is reproduced with permission, at http://qrp-labs.com/qcx . Various things were tried to improve the phase noise performance (capacitor and inductor filtering of the supply to the Si5351A) - none made any difference; the conclusion is that the QCX is already as good as it gets and performance is determined by the PLL of the Si5351A chip. 

Other conclusions from the experiments are relevant to anyone using the Si5351A. Specifically, heavy loading (50-ohm impedance) damages the phase noise performance of the Si5351A quite significantly. This can be partially mitigated by using a 0.1uF DC-blocking capacitor. A clean supply is also important (Kevin's results). Previous acquired knowledge on Si5351A output loading indicates that heavy loading will also cause crosstalk between outputs, as well as deteriorate the output waveform and reduce its amplitude. 

Therefore anyone using the Si5351A in applications where high drive levels are required, such as a diode ring mixer, should make sure that they buffer the Si5351A outputs, not use them directly connected to the mixer or 50-ohm attenuator pads. I have seen some Si5351A breakout boards that use small 50-ohm transformers at each Si5351A output and this is also wrong (from the perspective of phase noise performance). 

73 Hans G0UPL

Re: My short guide to a first CW QSO

John Rabson
 

Hans,

An excellent guide. I recall using similar methods in the late 1950s coupled with looking from the school bus at car number plates and thinking of how they would sound.

Many years later, I find it relaxing to tune to a CW section of an amateur band and just listen.

73 John F5VLF G3PAI

On 1 Oct 2019, at 19:51, Hans Summers <hans.summers@...> wrote:

Hello Hajo, others

Thanks for your thoughtful email Hajo... I agree with all you say. But perhaps I was unclear in my description of how I learnt. I did mention the fact that there are many ways to learn. My way may not have been the best. But it was 1993 and I did not know any Morse operators to tell me anything. And in 1993 there was no internet and no Google... 

But perhaps anyway I was unclear. I do not mean that I ever started at 1 word per minute. There I would very definitely be counting symbols etc. I started at a "certain speed" which if I recall correctly, was 12wpm letters, with a more sizeable gap in between, to slow down the overall effective speed. What I now know to be called Farnsworth method. Even at that time, and having had some musical training, it was clear to me that I would be better to run the code fast enough to be able to recognise the rhythms of a whole character, not count the dits and dahs. 

I recall that computer program I wrote (in BASIC!), was in sections - each section was 5 minutes of recording on the audio cassette. As I mastered each section and moved on to the next, the speed increased 1 wpm. To start with, that meant keeping the characters at 12wpm and just decreasing the size of the wait between them. After 12wpm, the timing became "standard" and the character symbols got faster and faster, everything proportionate as nature intended. 

So absolutely I agree - listening for complete letter sounds, not individual dits and dahs, is required! And as you describe, the next step is to write those down and try to learn the sounds of complete words. The CW Ops academy, I understand, practice the same approach. 

Regarding the other comments, they are all very interesting... and I did predict this, as I know a lot of the finer details are the subject of much debate... see the last paragraph of my article http://www.qrp-labs.com/qcx/cwqso.html :

"Now I know that now I have written this, a hundred well-meaning individuals will email me to tell me that I have missed out this or that important Q-code or abbreviation, and I am wrong on this or that aspect of QSO procedure. I am sure you are all 100.0% right. All I have written here is my practical guide to getting started, which is based on my own limited practical experience of CW on HF bands. It isn't necessarily perfect, nor complete. But I hope it helps someone."

I am sure my article isn't 100% right, but it is mostly right, and I think good enough to quite well manage on air... I am living proof that a mediocre someone with mediocre skills and mediocre equipment and certainly not much time, can manage it. So hopefully almost anyone can... and have lots of fun at the same time while learning!

73 Hans G0UPL



On Tue, Oct 1, 2019 at 4:40 PM Hajo Dezelski <dl1sdz@...> wrote:
Thanks Hans,
 
for the interesting summary: „ How to become a skilled CW-operator“. I would follow most of your suggestions, but I have some problems accepting your proposal how to learn CW.
 
When you do it in a traditional way as most of us have done, you will run into several problems on your way to speed up and send free text as you would speak.
 
First you have to get used to distinguish dots and dashes. And you will learn that the pause between these signs have different lengths. And the length of that pause is important for your understanding.
Then you will learn the characters with all the dots and dashes. In the beginning you will count the dots when the character has more than three elements. And the training phase is accompanied with the drill of 5-random-letter words. This military exercise focusing on letters and no meaning or semantic is hard, very hard and has nothing to do with normal speech. 
And it is done with a speed that is abnormally slow, so that your brain still can count dots and dashes.
 
 
Later you train words used in a conversation and suddenly reading the morse code will become more easy. But this advantage will not come from the training but from your mind which already has learned the words in natural language. You will hear some coherent letters and your mind anticipate the letters standing in the queue to be transmitted. For the rest of the word you only have to check if your guessing was right.  
 
The next obstacle will be to advance your speed. The giving will not be  major problem, but the hearing. When you advance from 60 to 90 or 120 bpm, your brain is to slow to calculate the number of dots and dashes of a letter. So the initial learning pattern has to be substituted with the rhythm of the letter. This is a long and frustrating process. In fact you are learning a new language which doubles the pain.
 
If you are still writing the letters with the pencil on a paper at about 150 bpm you will hit the next barrier: You hands are too slow. You have to learn to decipher the words in your head. You start to listen not to random letters but to melodies / rhythm of the words. This is the third time that you learn a new language and nearly forget what you have learned before. 
 
This is also the point where you start to recognize patterns of whole phrases as a single unit (e.g. “CCQ CQ CQ DX de “) You don’t have to listen to words. When the partner says “My name …” you start to grab the pencil to write his name down.
 
We are hams and normally we will not discuss Schopenhauer’s “ Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellung” over the waves. To begin with it is normal that we use English. The next restriction is that we exchange basic information (Call, name, city, power, trx, weather). And as Hans has collected we use a basic set of about 50 words, which we have to know. So in the beginning we can use “baby-talk” to discover the rest of the ham-world as we know it.   
 
When a baby starts to discover the world of words, it catches the sound and tries to repeat the sounds. So if people say they would speak Italian after staying two weeks in that country, they learned their Italian the same way: They heard words in a context and repeated that sound (”Ciao”) without knowing how to spell it. And this works perfectly even for small sentences. There is no need to transform yourself into a kid first time in school and learning the alphabet. You just have to remember about 20 to 50 melodies and rhythms to be ready for a small conversation.
 
First set all of your transceivers to a defined cw-tone. Let’s say 600 Hz and use small filters. So when you hear a cw conversation you will not hear melodies going up and down - you will hear distinct rhythm phrases, which should be remembered just as the pattern of a song which you like.
Now get on the band search for a cw-signal at the normal tempo 100-130 bpm.
- Concentrate on listening.
Of course you will need in the process to distinguish words and letters. And the best way to memorize it is to write the letter down as you recognize the letter pattern. You will often hear words of the Q-code. So these words will stick out and will be learned first.
- Write down with your hand the letter or part of the word.
And verify: Use an SDR or QCX with waterfall and CW-decoding (Elecraft is still the best.) 
- compare on screen what you have heard.
 
So this is a three phase sequential approach:
1. Hear the cw-pattern
2. Write down
3. Visually compare you finding
 
Of course this will cost some time, but if you use a contest where there are a lot of stations calling. You can take advantage to try to decipher e.g. the difficult call sign from the other station. Listen - write - compare . See the letter pattern which you were unable to understand and try to grab this pattern with your ear in the next round.
 
 
Of course in the end there is no way to avoid learning all letters and the CW equivalent, but from the beginning you concentrated not on dots and dashes but on complex but distinguishable rhythm patters and phrases.
 
The rest is on-the-air training, training, training …
And don’ t forget the fun
 
Hajo



Re: 18650 batteries for QCX

Jim W8JD <jimd2002@...>
 

I stand corrected, the vapers should be thanking Tesla.  I think Tesla moved to a larger format in current production.

QCX-40 worked the first time !

CW Morse
 

What a fun little rig.  Amazing what Hans squeezed into it.  Next step is learning all the functionality. 
FWIW & YMMV, here are hints about construction that I put together during The Process:
* wind & mount T1 first, as recommended in 3.56 .
* Use the highlighting feature of Acrobat Reader to mark steps Completed as you do them.
* use an eraser (like school kids have) as a support for large components like IC sockets.  Insert the component, then overturn the board locating the eraser under the component.  This pushes all the pins thru the board for soldering.
* on said multi-pin parts, solder ONLY ONE pin, then use a finger to press the part onto the top side of the board while melting the just soldered pin so that you're sure it's flatly seated.  Then solder the rest of the pins.  Once you solder the 2nd pin, it's all over!
* Be careful of zeroes that have a line through them vs 8's that look similar on the silkscreen side of the board.  I think it was R30 and R38 that I mistakenly swapped.
* When you bend the leads over to hold a component for soldering, only bend them as much as necessary.  This makes it easier if you have to extract a component (see above comment).
* very small end nippers (see eBay) come in very handy for cutting leads flush.  Could sub a plier type nail trimmer.
* Consider doing step 3.49, the two single point test points before installing the 3 potentiometers.  With them in place, it's hard to hold the test points in place while soldering (at all, or without burning a finger).
* In step 3.52, installation of the LCD module header, I found it easiest to get the two halves aligned by plugging both firmly into the 16 pin female header and then soldering it to the board.  Leave the female header there, since you will just have to reattach it in step 3.66.
* For L1-L4, if you use the "heat up with a soldering iron" method for removing the enamel, wipe the hot ends with a damp sponge to remove solder droplets.  Otherwise it's tough to get the wires into the board holes.  On those inductors I inserted the ends, bent & soldered one, then snugged, bent & soldered the other.  This keeps the core snug against the board.  Before cutting the ends is a good time to check coil continuity with your VOM on Beep.  I also then dropped a dollop of krazy glue on to secure the core to the board.  Gel type krazy glue would probably work even better. Let it dry overnight; it only glues skin instantly.  I pre-measured & cut the wire for each inductor.  By my empirical measurement, it was about 1/2" per turn, plus an inch at each end.  This turned out to be a little long, which caused worry that the last 2 pieces would be short.  Worked out, but with not too much to spare.
* It seems more logical to swap steps 3.66 & 3.67 so you don't have to unplug the LCD display.
* The upper right metal mounting tab on the LCD display looked real close to L2, so I bent it over before mounting the display.

Don    K2BIO

WB5BKL: QCX-0300

WB5BKL
 

-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: QCX WB5BKL QRP
Date: Tue, 01 Oct 2019 19:44:27 +0000

QCX Challenge - 0300Z Oct 1

Call: WB5BKL


Class: Single Op QRP
QTH: STX
Operating Time (hrs): 1:00

Summary:
Band QSOs
------------
40: 2
------------
Total: 2 Total Score = 4

Club:
Comments:

QCX-40 to a 40M extended double Zepp. Thanks to ND6P for the QCX/QCX QSO. Had fun.


Posted using 3830 Score Submittal Forms at: http://www.3830scores.com/

Re: 12 meter FT8 receive action today on the modified QCX-17

n4qa at_hotmail.com
 

oops, forgot to include the logbook before...

72 / 73,
Bill, N4QA

12 meter FT8 receive action today on the modified QCX-17

n4qa at_hotmail.com
 

72 / 73,
Bill, N4QA

Re: My short guide to a first CW QSO

Hans Summers
 

Hello Hajo, others

Thanks for your thoughtful email Hajo... I agree with all you say. But perhaps I was unclear in my description of how I learnt. I did mention the fact that there are many ways to learn. My way may not have been the best. But it was 1993 and I did not know any Morse operators to tell me anything. And in 1993 there was no internet and no Google... 

But perhaps anyway I was unclear. I do not mean that I ever started at 1 word per minute. There I would very definitely be counting symbols etc. I started at a "certain speed" which if I recall correctly, was 12wpm letters, with a more sizeable gap in between, to slow down the overall effective speed. What I now know to be called Farnsworth method. Even at that time, and having had some musical training, it was clear to me that I would be better to run the code fast enough to be able to recognise the rhythms of a whole character, not count the dits and dahs. 

I recall that computer program I wrote (in BASIC!), was in sections - each section was 5 minutes of recording on the audio cassette. As I mastered each section and moved on to the next, the speed increased 1 wpm. To start with, that meant keeping the characters at 12wpm and just decreasing the size of the wait between them. After 12wpm, the timing became "standard" and the character symbols got faster and faster, everything proportionate as nature intended. 

So absolutely I agree - listening for complete letter sounds, not individual dits and dahs, is required! And as you describe, the next step is to write those down and try to learn the sounds of complete words. The CW Ops academy, I understand, practice the same approach. 

Regarding the other comments, they are all very interesting... and I did predict this, as I know a lot of the finer details are the subject of much debate... see the last paragraph of my article http://www.qrp-labs.com/qcx/cwqso.html :

"Now I know that now I have written this, a hundred well-meaning individuals will email me to tell me that I have missed out this or that important Q-code or abbreviation, and I am wrong on this or that aspect of QSO procedure. I am sure you are all 100.0% right. All I have written here is my practical guide to getting started, which is based on my own limited practical experience of CW on HF bands. It isn't necessarily perfect, nor complete. But I hope it helps someone."

I am sure my article isn't 100% right, but it is mostly right, and I think good enough to quite well manage on air... I am living proof that a mediocre someone with mediocre skills and mediocre equipment and certainly not much time, can manage it. So hopefully almost anyone can... and have lots of fun at the same time while learning!

73 Hans G0UPL



On Tue, Oct 1, 2019 at 4:40 PM Hajo Dezelski <dl1sdz@...> wrote:
Thanks Hans,
 
for the interesting summary: „ How to become a skilled CW-operator“. I would follow most of your suggestions, but I have some problems accepting your proposal how to learn CW.
 
When you do it in a traditional way as most of us have done, you will run into several problems on your way to speed up and send free text as you would speak.
 
First you have to get used to distinguish dots and dashes. And you will learn that the pause between these signs have different lengths. And the length of that pause is important for your understanding.
Then you will learn the characters with all the dots and dashes. In the beginning you will count the dots when the character has more than three elements. And the training phase is accompanied with the drill of 5-random-letter words. This military exercise focusing on letters and no meaning or semantic is hard, very hard and has nothing to do with normal speech. 
And it is done with a speed that is abnormally slow, so that your brain still can count dots and dashes.
 
 
Later you train words used in a conversation and suddenly reading the morse code will become more easy. But this advantage will not come from the training but from your mind which already has learned the words in natural language. You will hear some coherent letters and your mind anticipate the letters standing in the queue to be transmitted. For the rest of the word you only have to check if your guessing was right.  
 
The next obstacle will be to advance your speed. The giving will not be  major problem, but the hearing. When you advance from 60 to 90 or 120 bpm, your brain is to slow to calculate the number of dots and dashes of a letter. So the initial learning pattern has to be substituted with the rhythm of the letter. This is a long and frustrating process. In fact you are learning a new language which doubles the pain.
 
If you are still writing the letters with the pencil on a paper at about 150 bpm you will hit the next barrier: You hands are too slow. You have to learn to decipher the words in your head. You start to listen not to random letters but to melodies / rhythm of the words. This is the third time that you learn a new language and nearly forget what you have learned before. 
 
This is also the point where you start to recognize patterns of whole phrases as a single unit (e.g. “CCQ CQ CQ DX de “) You don’t have to listen to words. When the partner says “My name …” you start to grab the pencil to write his name down.
 
We are hams and normally we will not discuss Schopenhauer’s “ Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellung” over the waves. To begin with it is normal that we use English. The next restriction is that we exchange basic information (Call, name, city, power, trx, weather). And as Hans has collected we use a basic set of about 50 words, which we have to know. So in the beginning we can use “baby-talk” to discover the rest of the ham-world as we know it.   
 
When a baby starts to discover the world of words, it catches the sound and tries to repeat the sounds. So if people say they would speak Italian after staying two weeks in that country, they learned their Italian the same way: They heard words in a context and repeated that sound (”Ciao”) without knowing how to spell it. And this works perfectly even for small sentences. There is no need to transform yourself into a kid first time in school and learning the alphabet. You just have to remember about 20 to 50 melodies and rhythms to be ready for a small conversation.
 
First set all of your transceivers to a defined cw-tone. Let’s say 600 Hz and use small filters. So when you hear a cw conversation you will not hear melodies going up and down - you will hear distinct rhythm phrases, which should be remembered just as the pattern of a song which you like.
Now get on the band search for a cw-signal at the normal tempo 100-130 bpm.
- Concentrate on listening.
Of course you will need in the process to distinguish words and letters. And the best way to memorize it is to write the letter down as you recognize the letter pattern. You will often hear words of the Q-code. So these words will stick out and will be learned first.
- Write down with your hand the letter or part of the word.
And verify: Use an SDR or QCX with waterfall and CW-decoding (Elecraft is still the best.) 
- compare on screen what you have heard.
 
So this is a three phase sequential approach:
1. Hear the cw-pattern
2. Write down
3. Visually compare you finding
 
Of course this will cost some time, but if you use a contest where there are a lot of stations calling. You can take advantage to try to decipher e.g. the difficult call sign from the other station. Listen - write - compare . See the letter pattern which you were unable to understand and try to grab this pattern with your ear in the next round.
 
 
Of course in the end there is no way to avoid learning all letters and the CW equivalent, but from the beginning you concentrated not on dots and dashes but on complex but distinguishable rhythm patters and phrases.
 
The rest is on-the-air training, training, training …
And don’ t forget the fun
 
Hajo

Re: QSO Party

Tom N9GVP
 

I only tried the 0300Z time slot, working from central Illinois on 40 meters with the QCX.  I only made one contact (non-QCX) in Arizona and had a fairly lengthy QSO.  My signal report was 589, so I was pleased with that.

I heard ND6P with QCX calling CQ faintly.  I tried responding, but no luck.  Still lots of fun trying.  May the conditions be better next time!

73,
Tom - N9GVP

Re: QSO Party

HB9FIH
 

Merci Luc, for ur report
13:00 20m was sucessfull 8 QSO and 2 with QCX (G4VHM and DL1BJA) 

16:00 20m 1 QSO with DL with a FT-817. I heard vy loud F5GSK, OH1OR but seems they could not read me. Then I changed to 40m (with the X1M) - and here was the OK Memorial Contest... Result 1 QSO on 20m

03:00 20m dead. 40m I called and called - seems first I was lonely on the Band. Abt 03:30 heard EA6NB loud and an IK3.. called but to my reply no answer.

Then started an QSO with OK2GER but within the QSO no more reply. After calling long time again (I was on RBN seen in Estonia and have seen my stripe  on Twente) an Ukrainian OM came back. Result 1 QSO

The Monday 19 o'clock on 40m is hard. Because of the weekly OK Memorial Contest.

But it's ok - we must have a bit of Adrenalin.... (on my ship: one time I was wondering what kind of short digital signals comming periodically - it was FT4. So I tried and played a bit with 25-30 Watts from the ship. After some time I had several Japanese and other DX in log. Then I closed - becomes boring) 

So we are hopefully looking forward for next time..we have now one month to prepare.

73 Erich

 

Re: Intermittent QCX backlight issue and while troubleshooting I probably shorted the ATmega processor

Craig Goodwin
 

Thanks for the replies, guys. Jim - I emailed you regarding your offer, and thanks again.

Chris - you're not telling me anything I don't know (now), and you're absolutely correct! Too bad that mistakes are a better teacher sometimes than listening to good advice before they happened, at least for some people (me included, apparently haha).

Re: QSO Party

ON7DQ Luc
 

My results were also very poor.

1300Z
Started CQ on 20m first half hour ... NIL
Saw TA4/G0UPL spotted on 14062, heard him twice very down in the noise ... called him but no QSO
Same for GM0EUL on 20m.
Then went to 40m for second half hour, called a lot of CQ's but no replies ...
Found an italian station with 50W and a 6m wire on balcony ... not QRP, nor QCX, but still an interesting QSO.
Then just before "closing time" I could work Peter GM0EUL with his K2 at 5W, he told me his QCX was not working ... too bad.

1900Z
20m completely dead !
40M ... called CQ for almost the full hour ... NIL
I could hear just ONE station in the whole CW portion of the band, CT8/DJ5MW, tried to call him several times, but the pile up was too much for my 5W ... would have been nice though ...

Hoping for better condx next time ...

73 de Luc - ON7DQ
(now playing with a newly aquired nanoVNA ... WOW, what a nice tool is that !)