Today’s mechanical challenge


James Graves
 

Good suggestion mine is already out. 

Jim Graves


On Aug 17, 2020, at 1:40 PM, Gregory Simms <gasgregory62@...> wrote:


My input on running hot ,in general. If your cars have a catalytic converter either chisel out the honeycomb inside or eliminate it completely. I'm told by British Racing Green( I was there today in Newark Del.) that the cat is so close to engine and generated super hight heat thus radiates to the engine . Causes eventual  collateral damage to head. Also you WILL gain a couple more horse power eliminating the honeycomb .
Greg S.

On Sun, Aug 16, 2020, 10:00 PM Ira Spector <spectors4@...> wrote:
All great advice. I went through this same routine. My car would run fine, but wouldn’t restart when hot. It was a bad coil.

Ira

On Aug 16, 2020, at 11:57 AM, Stephen McDowell via groups.io <stephen.mcdowell2020=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


Also, the gauge in the car should be right of vertical. Sorta like the Washington monument leaning to the right.

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 11:17:08 AM EDT, Stephen McDowell via groups.io <stephen.mcdowell2020=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


Correction temp should be between  180 and 190

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 11:06:58 AM EDT, Stephen McDowell <stephen.mcdowell2020@...> wrote:


Wish I could see the B first hand but, since i can't, let me shoot some suggests as several things come to mind.
- use a thermal temp gauge to check the temp at the water intake area (above thermostat)  it should read around 190 degrees, you should have the high temp thermostat that kicks in at 180 degrees
- check the compression of the cylinders.  They should be all about the same between 120 and 150.  My B too was overheating a bit and when I check the compression I had 120, 0, 120, 120.  Pulled the head and found it cracked and that is what was causing the issue.
- are both front fans spinning? or if you have a behind radiator fan, if it working?
- another problem may be the fans and spinning backwards.  The fan should be pushing air into the radiator, not pulling thru the radiator. 
- if there is an air deflector under your front bumper, make sure the license plate is not installed dead center as this block the flow of air into the radiator.

- you mentioned that it might be vapor in the fuel line to the canisters that is causing hard starts after you have been driving..  If there is vapor there, it will cool to wet gas and then the engine won't start.  Once the engine sits awhile, the gas in the line will evaporate and you can start the car, the problem is when it sits there when you are driving and if you try to start the engine when hot, it won't.This is caused by the line dipping when the hood is closed and making a valley for the vapor.  Use a wire tie and attach it to one of the other hoses to keep is "up" when the hood is closed.

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 10:41:56 AM EDT, James Graves via groups.io <merryhill=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:


The Gimlet (‘73 B) has always run hot since I’ve owned her.  “Normal running temp” has the gauge mid-way between normal and hot.

In an effort to address this, I have flushed the radiator, replacing the coolant and installed an oil- cooler this summer.  She still runs hot, now closer to the warning zone on the gauge.

Yesterday, I stalled her and couldn’t get the starter to fire her up.  Popped the clutch to her her going and home.  Wouldn’t re-start in the garage until she sat.  Wondering if the hot engine was vaporizing the fuel?  I do hate my Weber.... next project!

Thinking I should test the thermostat.  Other thoughts?????



Gregory Simms
 

My input on running hot ,in general. If your cars have a catalytic converter either chisel out the honeycomb inside or eliminate it completely. I'm told by British Racing Green( I was there today in Newark Del.) that the cat is so close to engine and generated super hight heat thus radiates to the engine . Causes eventual  collateral damage to head. Also you WILL gain a couple more horse power eliminating the honeycomb .
Greg S.

On Sun, Aug 16, 2020, 10:00 PM Ira Spector <spectors4@...> wrote:
All great advice. I went through this same routine. My car would run fine, but wouldn’t restart when hot. It was a bad coil.

Ira

On Aug 16, 2020, at 11:57 AM, Stephen McDowell via groups.io <stephen.mcdowell2020=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


Also, the gauge in the car should be right of vertical. Sorta like the Washington monument leaning to the right.

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 11:17:08 AM EDT, Stephen McDowell via groups.io <stephen.mcdowell2020=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


Correction temp should be between  180 and 190

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 11:06:58 AM EDT, Stephen McDowell <stephen.mcdowell2020@...> wrote:


Wish I could see the B first hand but, since i can't, let me shoot some suggests as several things come to mind.
- use a thermal temp gauge to check the temp at the water intake area (above thermostat)  it should read around 190 degrees, you should have the high temp thermostat that kicks in at 180 degrees
- check the compression of the cylinders.  They should be all about the same between 120 and 150.  My B too was overheating a bit and when I check the compression I had 120, 0, 120, 120.  Pulled the head and found it cracked and that is what was causing the issue.
- are both front fans spinning? or if you have a behind radiator fan, if it working?
- another problem may be the fans and spinning backwards.  The fan should be pushing air into the radiator, not pulling thru the radiator. 
- if there is an air deflector under your front bumper, make sure the license plate is not installed dead center as this block the flow of air into the radiator.

- you mentioned that it might be vapor in the fuel line to the canisters that is causing hard starts after you have been driving..  If there is vapor there, it will cool to wet gas and then the engine won't start.  Once the engine sits awhile, the gas in the line will evaporate and you can start the car, the problem is when it sits there when you are driving and if you try to start the engine when hot, it won't.This is caused by the line dipping when the hood is closed and making a valley for the vapor.  Use a wire tie and attach it to one of the other hoses to keep is "up" when the hood is closed.

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 10:41:56 AM EDT, James Graves via groups.io <merryhill=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:


The Gimlet (‘73 B) has always run hot since I’ve owned her.  “Normal running temp” has the gauge mid-way between normal and hot.

In an effort to address this, I have flushed the radiator, replacing the coolant and installed an oil- cooler this summer.  She still runs hot, now closer to the warning zone on the gauge.

Yesterday, I stalled her and couldn’t get the starter to fire her up.  Popped the clutch to her her going and home.  Wouldn’t re-start in the garage until she sat.  Wondering if the hot engine was vaporizing the fuel?  I do hate my Weber.... next project!

Thinking I should test the thermostat.  Other thoughts?????



Ira Spector
 

All great advice. I went through this same routine. My car would run fine, but wouldn’t restart when hot. It was a bad coil.

Ira

On Aug 16, 2020, at 11:57 AM, Stephen McDowell via groups.io <stephen.mcdowell2020@...> wrote:


Also, the gauge in the car should be right of vertical. Sorta like the Washington monument leaning to the right.

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 11:17:08 AM EDT, Stephen McDowell via groups.io <stephen.mcdowell2020@...> wrote:


Correction temp should be between  180 and 190

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 11:06:58 AM EDT, Stephen McDowell <stephen.mcdowell2020@...> wrote:


Wish I could see the B first hand but, since i can't, let me shoot some suggests as several things come to mind.
- use a thermal temp gauge to check the temp at the water intake area (above thermostat)  it should read around 190 degrees, you should have the high temp thermostat that kicks in at 180 degrees
- check the compression of the cylinders.  They should be all about the same between 120 and 150.  My B too was overheating a bit and when I check the compression I had 120, 0, 120, 120.  Pulled the head and found it cracked and that is what was causing the issue.
- are both front fans spinning? or if you have a behind radiator fan, if it working?
- another problem may be the fans and spinning backwards.  The fan should be pushing air into the radiator, not pulling thru the radiator. 
- if there is an air deflector under your front bumper, make sure the license plate is not installed dead center as this block the flow of air into the radiator.

- you mentioned that it might be vapor in the fuel line to the canisters that is causing hard starts after you have been driving..  If there is vapor there, it will cool to wet gas and then the engine won't start.  Once the engine sits awhile, the gas in the line will evaporate and you can start the car, the problem is when it sits there when you are driving and if you try to start the engine when hot, it won't.This is caused by the line dipping when the hood is closed and making a valley for the vapor.  Use a wire tie and attach it to one of the other hoses to keep is "up" when the hood is closed.

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 10:41:56 AM EDT, James Graves via groups.io <merryhill@...> wrote:


The Gimlet (‘73 B) has always run hot since I’ve owned her.  “Normal running temp” has the gauge mid-way between normal and hot.

In an effort to address this, I have flushed the radiator, replacing the coolant and installed an oil- cooler this summer.  She still runs hot, now closer to the warning zone on the gauge.

Yesterday, I stalled her and couldn’t get the starter to fire her up.  Popped the clutch to her her going and home.  Wouldn’t re-start in the garage until she sat.  Wondering if the hot engine was vaporizing the fuel?  I do hate my Weber.... next project!

Thinking I should test the thermostat.  Other thoughts?????



Stephen McDowell <stephen.mcdowell2020@...>
 

Also, the gauge in the car should be right of vertical. Sorta like the Washington monument leaning to the right.

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 11:17:08 AM EDT, Stephen McDowell via groups.io <stephen.mcdowell2020@...> wrote:


Correction temp should be between  180 and 190

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 11:06:58 AM EDT, Stephen McDowell <stephen.mcdowell2020@...> wrote:


Wish I could see the B first hand but, since i can't, let me shoot some suggests as several things come to mind.
- use a thermal temp gauge to check the temp at the water intake area (above thermostat)  it should read around 190 degrees, you should have the high temp thermostat that kicks in at 180 degrees
- check the compression of the cylinders.  They should be all about the same between 120 and 150.  My B too was overheating a bit and when I check the compression I had 120, 0, 120, 120.  Pulled the head and found it cracked and that is what was causing the issue.
- are both front fans spinning? or if you have a behind radiator fan, if it working?
- another problem may be the fans and spinning backwards.  The fan should be pushing air into the radiator, not pulling thru the radiator. 
- if there is an air deflector under your front bumper, make sure the license plate is not installed dead center as this block the flow of air into the radiator.

- you mentioned that it might be vapor in the fuel line to the canisters that is causing hard starts after you have been driving..  If there is vapor there, it will cool to wet gas and then the engine won't start.  Once the engine sits awhile, the gas in the line will evaporate and you can start the car, the problem is when it sits there when you are driving and if you try to start the engine when hot, it won't.This is caused by the line dipping when the hood is closed and making a valley for the vapor.  Use a wire tie and attach it to one of the other hoses to keep is "up" when the hood is closed.

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 10:41:56 AM EDT, James Graves via groups.io <merryhill@...> wrote:


The Gimlet (‘73 B) has always run hot since I’ve owned her.  “Normal running temp” has the gauge mid-way between normal and hot.

In an effort to address this, I have flushed the radiator, replacing the coolant and installed an oil- cooler this summer.  She still runs hot, now closer to the warning zone on the gauge.

Yesterday, I stalled her and couldn’t get the starter to fire her up.  Popped the clutch to her her going and home.  Wouldn’t re-start in the garage until she sat.  Wondering if the hot engine was vaporizing the fuel?  I do hate my Weber.... next project!

Thinking I should test the thermostat.  Other thoughts?????



Stephen McDowell <stephen.mcdowell2020@...>
 

Correction temp should be between  180 and 190

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 11:06:58 AM EDT, Stephen McDowell <stephen.mcdowell2020@...> wrote:


Wish I could see the B first hand but, since i can't, let me shoot some suggests as several things come to mind.
- use a thermal temp gauge to check the temp at the water intake area (above thermostat)  it should read around 190 degrees, you should have the high temp thermostat that kicks in at 180 degrees
- check the compression of the cylinders.  They should be all about the same between 120 and 150.  My B too was overheating a bit and when I check the compression I had 120, 0, 120, 120.  Pulled the head and found it cracked and that is what was causing the issue.
- are both front fans spinning? or if you have a behind radiator fan, if it working?
- another problem may be the fans and spinning backwards.  The fan should be pushing air into the radiator, not pulling thru the radiator. 
- if there is an air deflector under your front bumper, make sure the license plate is not installed dead center as this block the flow of air into the radiator.

- you mentioned that it might be vapor in the fuel line to the canisters that is causing hard starts after you have been driving..  If there is vapor there, it will cool to wet gas and then the engine won't start.  Once the engine sits awhile, the gas in the line will evaporate and you can start the car, the problem is when it sits there when you are driving and if you try to start the engine when hot, it won't.This is caused by the line dipping when the hood is closed and making a valley for the vapor.  Use a wire tie and attach it to one of the other hoses to keep is "up" when the hood is closed.

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 10:41:56 AM EDT, James Graves via groups.io <merryhill@...> wrote:


The Gimlet (‘73 B) has always run hot since I’ve owned her.  “Normal running temp” has the gauge mid-way between normal and hot.

In an effort to address this, I have flushed the radiator, replacing the coolant and installed an oil- cooler this summer.  She still runs hot, now closer to the warning zone on the gauge.

Yesterday, I stalled her and couldn’t get the starter to fire her up.  Popped the clutch to her her going and home.  Wouldn’t re-start in the garage until she sat.  Wondering if the hot engine was vaporizing the fuel?  I do hate my Weber.... next project!

Thinking I should test the thermostat.  Other thoughts?????



James Graves
 

Great suggestions. Thank you!

Jim Graves


On Aug 16, 2020, at 11:07 AM, Stephen McDowell via groups.io <stephen.mcdowell2020@...> wrote:


Wish I could see the B first hand but, since i can't, let me shoot some suggests as several things come to mind.
- use a thermal temp gauge to check the temp at the water intake area (above thermostat)  it should read around 190 degrees, you should have the high temp thermostat that kicks in at 180 degrees
- check the compression of the cylinders.  They should be all about the same between 120 and 150.  My B too was overheating a bit and when I check the compression I had 120, 0, 120, 120.  Pulled the head and found it cracked and that is what was causing the issue.
- are both front fans spinning? or if you have a behind radiator fan, if it working?
- another problem may be the fans and spinning backwards.  The fan should be pushing air into the radiator, not pulling thru the radiator. 
- if there is an air deflector under your front bumper, make sure the license plate is not installed dead center as this block the flow of air into the radiator.

- you mentioned that it might be vapor in the fuel line to the canisters that is causing hard starts after you have been driving..  If there is vapor there, it will cool to wet gas and then the engine won't start.  Once the engine sits awhile, the gas in the line will evaporate and you can start the car, the problem is when it sits there when you are driving and if you try to start the engine when hot, it won't.This is caused by the line dipping when the hood is closed and making a valley for the vapor.  Use a wire tie and attach it to one of the other hoses to keep is "up" when the hood is closed.

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 10:41:56 AM EDT, James Graves via groups.io <merryhill@...> wrote:


The Gimlet (‘73 B) has always run hot since I’ve owned her.  “Normal running temp” has the gauge mid-way between normal and hot.

In an effort to address this, I have flushed the radiator, replacing the coolant and installed an oil- cooler this summer.  She still runs hot, now closer to the warning zone on the gauge.

Yesterday, I stalled her and couldn’t get the starter to fire her up.  Popped the clutch to her her going and home.  Wouldn’t re-start in the garage until she sat.  Wondering if the hot engine was vaporizing the fuel?  I do hate my Weber.... next project!

Thinking I should test the thermostat.  Other thoughts?????



Stephen McDowell <stephen.mcdowell2020@...>
 

Wish I could see the B first hand but, since i can't, let me shoot some suggests as several things come to mind.
- use a thermal temp gauge to check the temp at the water intake area (above thermostat)  it should read around 190 degrees, you should have the high temp thermostat that kicks in at 180 degrees
- check the compression of the cylinders.  They should be all about the same between 120 and 150.  My B too was overheating a bit and when I check the compression I had 120, 0, 120, 120.  Pulled the head and found it cracked and that is what was causing the issue.
- are both front fans spinning? or if you have a behind radiator fan, if it working?
- another problem may be the fans and spinning backwards.  The fan should be pushing air into the radiator, not pulling thru the radiator. 
- if there is an air deflector under your front bumper, make sure the license plate is not installed dead center as this block the flow of air into the radiator.

- you mentioned that it might be vapor in the fuel line to the canisters that is causing hard starts after you have been driving..  If there is vapor there, it will cool to wet gas and then the engine won't start.  Once the engine sits awhile, the gas in the line will evaporate and you can start the car, the problem is when it sits there when you are driving and if you try to start the engine when hot, it won't.This is caused by the line dipping when the hood is closed and making a valley for the vapor.  Use a wire tie and attach it to one of the other hoses to keep is "up" when the hood is closed.

v/r
Steve
703-628-8194 - Cell



On Sunday, August 16, 2020, 10:41:56 AM EDT, James Graves via groups.io <merryhill@...> wrote:


The Gimlet (‘73 B) has always run hot since I’ve owned her.  “Normal running temp” has the gauge mid-way between normal and hot.

In an effort to address this, I have flushed the radiator, replacing the coolant and installed an oil- cooler this summer.  She still runs hot, now closer to the warning zone on the gauge.

Yesterday, I stalled her and couldn’t get the starter to fire her up.  Popped the clutch to her her going and home.  Wouldn’t re-start in the garage until she sat.  Wondering if the hot engine was vaporizing the fuel?  I do hate my Weber.... next project!

Thinking I should test the thermostat.  Other thoughts?????



James Graves
 

The Gimlet (‘73 B) has always run hot since I’ve owned her. “Normal running temp” has the gauge mid-way between normal and hot.

In an effort to address this, I have flushed the radiator, replacing the coolant and installed an oil- cooler this summer. She still runs hot, now closer to the warning zone on the gauge.

Yesterday, I stalled her and couldn’t get the starter to fire her up. Popped the clutch to her her going and home. Wouldn’t re-start in the garage until she sat. Wondering if the hot engine was vaporizing the fuel? I do hate my Weber.... next project!

Thinking I should test the thermostat. Other thoughts?????