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Thank you: "The Artist Who Loved Women" in its second edition!

 

Greetings:

Just a quick update on the Nagel world in general and the book particular:

The first pressing of The Artist Who Loved Women has just about sold out, prompting me to question whether a second pressing is warranted.  I've decided to move forward with a second edition, for a couple of reasons:

First, although I do profit from sales, the revenue generated is not exactly life-changing money.  When I began work on the book, it was very much an extension of my career in which as a consultant, I would provide effective brand strategies to launch funded start-ups and to turn around existing companies whose brands were languishing and hemorrhaging market share.  My thinking was that Patrick Nagel was the latter, a mature, stagnant, languishing brand that was dying of neglect.  I felt that with the right strategy and execution, the Nagel brand (and both its cultural and investment value) could be revitalized.

The first step toward that revitalization would be a book that educated the public as to who and what Patrick Nagel was.  Even now, far more people know Nagel's work than know his name, but we're making progress on that front.  I'd like to think the book has helped nudge that process along.

The second step toward securing Nagel's place in the annals of art would be to see the book made into a movie, if only because far more people stream their entertainment than turn pages of a book.  A cinematic feature eclipses a book's awareness by several orders of magnitude, in a much shorter span of time.  I live in Los Angeles, where movies are still a big business.  But to be candid, I'm a poor fit for that industry, and so my best shot at the brand finding its way into the movie industry is for someone else to discover the book and get it into the proper channels for production.  For someone to discover the book, there has to be a supply of books, which necessitates more copies in circulation.

Perhaps it's coincidence, but we've all watched Nagel's work increase in value significantly at the same time as the book's publication.  As far as I'm concerned, this is the book's chicken soup effect:  It may not be helping, but it certainly can't be hurting.  Collectible serigraphs, original illustrations and canvas pieces have all performed well over the last five years and I see no reason why that activity should stop.  Over that same period of time, the supply of collectible Nagel art has almost dried up at popular and higher-end auction houses.  Of the collectible pieces I do see, most are premium priced, offered by sellers who are adamant about their value.

I also notice that sales of the book, while not in the millions, are consistent throughout the year, with the obvious bump during the Christmas season.  To an old marketing eye, that signifies a strong, steady, growing interest in Nagel, and that's exactly what we want.  Another piece of interesting data is that the book's Instagram account is split amongst Millennials and Boomers, confirming that interest in Patrick Nagel is not merely sentimental, but truly accepted by a growing generation who recognizes and values his work on their own terms.

These are all encouraging signs, and so my mission continues.  Thanks to all who have purchased the book and continue to support Patrick Nagel's legacy.

Rob Frankel
TheArtistWhoLovedWomen.com


Nagelcollector
 

How many copies were in the first printing?

 

It was a test run. About 1,000, I believe. 

Rob Frankel
TheArtistWhoLovedWomen.com

Daniel Avrin
 

I am happy to say I received my signed copy a few weeks ago! I'm doing my part! 😁

flyinggardengnome
 

I think the world needs more material on Nagel, be it books or other forms (movie/merchandise), so a second Edition run of books is definitely a yes, at least for me! 

Even though his popularity has risen still not many people really know Nagel and his works. I think those who watched Thor Ragnarok, (especially youngsters) not even half of them truly notice (and appreciate) Banner’s shirt was actually Nagel’s Texas, but recognized it more as the “Duran Duran cover”. Well at least it’s better than those who didn’t notice anything at all! No offense to the band, I personally like them very much. It’s the youngsters that we need to educate more on Nagel. It’s up to them to spread, and continue, Nagel’s legacy. 

I really sincerely hope Rob’s book could get made into a mainstream movie. People really need to know about Nagel, his work is really under appreciated. I believe it will get made. Maybe not in recent years, but one day someone’s gonna do it. 

And I will be there to see it!


On 15 Oct 2019, at 5:29 am, Daniel Avrin <Bestavrin@...> wrote:

I am happy to say I received my signed copy a few weeks ago! I'm doing my part! 😁

Manuel Rodriguez
 

Rob, loved your book and this analysis of Nagel's art. I have to disagree with the valuation of Nagel art, however. I own several 10-30 year old rare Corvettes in addition to many limited Nagel serigraphs. The Corvette market is full of individuals who refuse to sell their low mileage Corvettes for less than exorbitant prices. These Corvettes sit in garages acquiring dust for decades, eventually to be sold by their offspring after their death for a fraction of the price they were originally priced at. Many articles in sports car magazines have noticed this trend, as Corvettes that are not driven, sold or bought. No one touches them. Just because the Nagel marketplace has markedly turned up in value does not mean that anyone is actually purchasing these ridiculously priced prints. These prints may languish at these price points, unsold and unpurchased, just like their limited edition Corvette brethren. I own Standing Lady and Mask, and I dare say that no one on these boards will pay me the premium valuations that I believe they deserve. We who love Nagel will continue to relish these images, but I'm not sure that real valuations are climbing.  

On Mon, Oct 14, 2019 at 3:38 PM robfrankel <rob@...> wrote:

Greetings:

Just a quick update on the Nagel world in general and the book particular:

The first pressing of The Artist Who Loved Women has just about sold out, prompting me to question whether a second pressing is warranted.  I've decided to move forward with a second edition, for a couple of reasons:

First, although I do profit from sales, the revenue generated is not exactly life-changing money.  When I began work on the book, it was very much an extension of my career in which as a consultant, I would provide effective brand strategies to launch funded start-ups and to turn around existing companies whose brands were languishing and hemorrhaging market share.  My thinking was that Patrick Nagel was the latter, a mature, stagnant, languishing brand that was dying of neglect.  I felt that with the right strategy and execution, the Nagel brand (and both its cultural and investment value) could be revitalized.

The first step toward that revitalization would be a book that educated the public as to who and what Patrick Nagel was.  Even now, far more people know Nagel's work than know his name, but we're making progress on that front.  I'd like to think the book has helped nudge that process along.

The second step toward securing Nagel's place in the annals of art would be to see the book made into a movie, if only because far more people stream their entertainment than turn pages of a book.  A cinematic feature eclipses a book's awareness by several orders of magnitude, in a much shorter span of time.  I live in Los Angeles, where movies are still a big business.  But to be candid, I'm a poor fit for that industry, and so my best shot at the brand finding its way into the movie industry is for someone else to discover the book and get it into the proper channels for production.  For someone to discover the book, there has to be a supply of books, which necessitates more copies in circulation.

Perhaps it's coincidence, but we've all watched Nagel's work increase in value significantly at the same time as the book's publication.  As far as I'm concerned, this is the book's chicken soup effect:  It may not be helping, but it certainly can't be hurting.  Collectible serigraphs, original illustrations and canvas pieces have all performed well over the last five years and I see no reason why that activity should stop.  Over that same period of time, the supply of collectible Nagel art has almost dried up at popular and higher-end auction houses.  Of the collectible pieces I do see, most are premium priced, offered by sellers who are adamant about their value.

I also notice that sales of the book, while not in the millions, are consistent throughout the year, with the obvious bump during the Christmas season.  To an old marketing eye, that signifies a strong, steady, growing interest in Nagel, and that's exactly what we want.  Another piece of interesting data is that the book's Instagram account is split amongst Millennials and Boomers, confirming that interest in Patrick Nagel is not merely sentimental, but truly accepted by a growing generation who recognizes and values his work on their own terms.

These are all encouraging signs, and so my mission continues.  Thanks to all who have purchased the book and continue to support Patrick Nagel's legacy.

Rob Frankel
TheArtistWhoLovedWomen.com


 

Hi Manuel:

Other than drooling over them, I am completely unqualified to comment on Corvettes. I do, however, stand by my comments about Nagel valuations, for a couple of reasons:

First, we have facts in plentiful supply.  The collectible serigraphs and originals have all increased substantially in value since their lows.  As little as five years ago, one could pick up a collectible serigraph in pristine condition for anywhere between US$150 and US$350.  Today, those pieces are selling -- and I mean people selling and buying them -- for ten times that amount.  Canvases, which are in extremely limited supply, have performed in much the same way: pieces that were sold for US$10K to US$25K are also being purchased for ten times those prices.

Second, there are always hoarders in every market.  Throughout my Nagel experience, whenever I've mingled with those who supposedly knew or knew of any of the characters from the Nagel era, there's always been one or two posers who claim to have "a bunch of his pieces under my bed at home."  Every time I've followed up with them, they -- along with their claims -- have simply evaporated.

Third, we know that a large number of Nagel serigraphs in particular have been damaged, discarded or destroyed.  Nobody knows for sure, and I accept my estimate is not factually verified, but every indication is that an average of 30% are still in collectible condition, especially when you look at the marketplace, where the supply of those pieces has been eviscerated.  So to my way of thinking, even if they're parked in garages, their values are still growing in the same way the Corvettes are -- especially the split rear window limited editions.

Finally, one could argue that going forward, the younger class of Nagel fans may actually drive values higher as they begin to trade their youthful idealism for financial stability and begin to generate more  disposable cash.  For some, an investment into "quality" art will become an option and Nagel serigraphs, due to their relative affordability, could be among their initial indulgences.

So from the 100,000 foot level, I see all indicators pointing in the right direction.  As with Corvettes, your mileage may vary.....

Rob Frankel
TheArtistWhoLovedWomen.com

Monica Moynihan
 

Manuel,

I like your post, a lot. I personally experience the same situation when trying to price out an older Porsche (it would have been my 3rd. I owned a 944 when I was 20 years old that I got for for a mere 7k (a steal at the time in 91') and then later a 911 convertible from the 90s. Honestly, my 944 was more fun, or maybe it was just my twenty year old self. I see crazy prices for these cars now. I tried to find a reasonable 928 from the late 80s. (My son says 944 suck.) I considered getting a 928 for myself and for my son who caught the classic car bug...they just sit in garages at prices of a Bentley lol. Good thing I didn't get it....he's now a Corvette fan. (Ha!)

On a Nagel note, I would love to know what prices you would be willing to sell your "Mask" and "Standing Lady" for. What is your bottom line? Please tell us. I happen to know a couple of collectors that want BOTH and one I know pays premium prices.

So what is the price you would let them go for? 

I personally picked up a Mask two weeks ago myself. I will share some photos in a separate post later. "Mask" deserves its own post. She is definitely beautiful and I am happy to hear you have one. Actually "Mask" does not get talked about much, probably because we never see it come up for sale. Besides myself I only knew of one other that had one and it was unsigned. 

Monica 



On Wed, Oct 16, 2019 at 6:36 AM Manuel Rodriguez <mannyar@...> wrote:
Rob, loved your book and this analysis of Nagel's art. I have to disagree with the valuation of Nagel art, however. I own several 10-30 year old rare Corvettes in addition to many limited Nagel serigraphs. The Corvette market is full of individuals who refuse to sell their low mileage Corvettes for less than exorbitant prices. These Corvettes sit in garages acquiring dust for decades, eventually to be sold by their offspring after their death for a fraction of the price they were originally priced at. Many articles in sports car magazines have noticed this trend, as Corvettes that are not driven, sold or bought. No one touches them. Just because the Nagel marketplace has markedly turned up in value does not mean that anyone is actually purchasing these ridiculously priced prints. These prints may languish at these price points, unsold and unpurchased, just like their limited edition Corvette brethren. I own Standing Lady and Mask, and I dare say that no one on these boards will pay me the premium valuations that I believe they deserve. We who love Nagel will continue to relish these images, but I'm not sure that real valuations are climbing.  

On Mon, Oct 14, 2019 at 3:38 PM robfrankel <rob@...> wrote:

Greetings:

Just a quick update on the Nagel world in general and the book particular:

The first pressing of The Artist Who Loved Women has just about sold out, prompting me to question whether a second pressing is warranted.  I've decided to move forward with a second edition, for a couple of reasons:

First, although I do profit from sales, the revenue generated is not exactly life-changing money.  When I began work on the book, it was very much an extension of my career in which as a consultant, I would provide effective brand strategies to launch funded start-ups and to turn around existing companies whose brands were languishing and hemorrhaging market share.  My thinking was that Patrick Nagel was the latter, a mature, stagnant, languishing brand that was dying of neglect.  I felt that with the right strategy and execution, the Nagel brand (and both its cultural and investment value) could be revitalized.

The first step toward that revitalization would be a book that educated the public as to who and what Patrick Nagel was.  Even now, far more people know Nagel's work than know his name, but we're making progress on that front.  I'd like to think the book has helped nudge that process along.

The second step toward securing Nagel's place in the annals of art would be to see the book made into a movie, if only because far more people stream their entertainment than turn pages of a book.  A cinematic feature eclipses a book's awareness by several orders of magnitude, in a much shorter span of time.  I live in Los Angeles, where movies are still a big business.  But to be candid, I'm a poor fit for that industry, and so my best shot at the brand finding its way into the movie industry is for someone else to discover the book and get it into the proper channels for production.  For someone to discover the book, there has to be a supply of books, which necessitates more copies in circulation.

Perhaps it's coincidence, but we've all watched Nagel's work increase in value significantly at the same time as the book's publication.  As far as I'm concerned, this is the book's chicken soup effect:  It may not be helping, but it certainly can't be hurting.  Collectible serigraphs, original illustrations and canvas pieces have all performed well over the last five years and I see no reason why that activity should stop.  Over that same period of time, the supply of collectible Nagel art has almost dried up at popular and higher-end auction houses.  Of the collectible pieces I do see, most are premium priced, offered by sellers who are adamant about their value.

I also notice that sales of the book, while not in the millions, are consistent throughout the year, with the obvious bump during the Christmas season.  To an old marketing eye, that signifies a strong, steady, growing interest in Nagel, and that's exactly what we want.  Another piece of interesting data is that the book's Instagram account is split amongst Millennials and Boomers, confirming that interest in Patrick Nagel is not merely sentimental, but truly accepted by a growing generation who recognizes and values his work on their own terms.

These are all encouraging signs, and so my mission continues.  Thanks to all who have purchased the book and continue to support Patrick Nagel's legacy.

Rob Frankel
TheArtistWhoLovedWomen.com




--
Monica Moynihan Perkal 
Realtor, Top Producing Luxury Agent
Pinnacle Estate Properties, Inc.
24025 Park Sorrento, #110 
Calabasas, CA 91302
(310) 429-2255 I DRE #01366039
"I Can Move Mountains..."

Confidentiality Notice: The contents of this electronic transmission including any attached documents may contain confidential and/or privileged information and/or legal work product protected by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act. This electronic transmission is solely for the use of the intended recipient(s). Unauthorized interception, review, use, disclosure, copying, distribution or dissemination of the information is prohibited and may violate applicable laws. If you have received this transmission in error, please notify the sender immediately by reply email or phone and then immediately delete this message. Thank you.


Susan del Barrio
 

I love this idea Rob!! A movie would be great. I will keep my eyes open for sure. Thank you for including me in and my proof sheets in your awesome book. 


On Oct 14, 2019, at 12:38 PM, robfrankel <rob@...> wrote:



Greetings:

Just a quick update on the Nagel world in general and the book particular:

The first pressing of The Artist Who Loved Women has just about sold out, prompting me to question whether a second pressing is warranted.  I've decided to move forward with a second edition, for a couple of reasons:

First, although I do profit from sales, the revenue generated is not exactly life-changing money.  When I began work on the book, it was very much an extension of my career in which as a consultant, I would provide effective brand strategies to launch funded start-ups and to turn around existing companies whose brands were languishing and hemorrhaging market share.  My thinking was that Patrick Nagel was the latter, a mature, stagnant, languishing brand that was dying of neglect.  I felt that with the right strategy and execution, the Nagel brand (and both its cultural and investment value) could be revitalized.

The first step toward that revitalization would be a book that educated the public as to who and what Patrick Nagel was.  Even now, far more people know Nagel's work than know his name, but we're making progress on that front.  I'd like to think the book has helped nudge that process along.

The second step toward securing Nagel's place in the annals of art would be to see the book made into a movie, if only because far more people stream their entertainment than turn pages of a book.  A cinematic feature eclipses a book's awareness by several orders of magnitude, in a much shorter span of time.  I live in Los Angeles, where movies are still a big business.  But to be candid, I'm a poor fit for that industry, and so my best shot at the brand finding its way into the movie industry is for someone else to discover the book and get it into the proper channels for production.  For someone to discover the book, there has to be a supply of books, which necessitates more copies in circulation.

Perhaps it's coincidence, but we've all watched Nagel's work increase in value significantly at the same time as the book's publication.  As far as I'm concerned, this is the book's chicken soup effect:  It may not be helping, but it certainly can't be hurting.  Collectible serigraphs, original illustrations and canvas pieces have all performed well over the last five years and I see no reason why that activity should stop.  Over that same period of time, the supply of collectible Nagel art has almost dried up at popular and higher-end auction houses.  Of the collectible pieces I do see, most are premium priced, offered by sellers who are adamant about their value.

I also notice that sales of the book, while not in the millions, are consistent throughout the year, with the obvious bump during the Christmas season.  To an old marketing eye, that signifies a strong, steady, growing interest in Nagel, and that's exactly what we want.  Another piece of interesting data is that the book's Instagram account is split amongst Millennials and Boomers, confirming that interest in Patrick Nagel is not merely sentimental, but truly accepted by a growing generation who recognizes and values his work on their own terms.

These are all encouraging signs, and so my mission continues.  Thanks to all who have purchased the book and continue to support Patrick Nagel's legacy.

Rob Frankel
TheArtistWhoLovedWomen.com


Manuel Rodriguez
 



Monica: 

These are very poor pics, but you can see the quality framing and specialized cut and spliced mats that went into Standing Lady. The colors in Mask remain fairly bright, although the lips were never bright to begin with. Send the group some pics of yours please. Interesting to see some more Masks. 


On Oct 16, 2019, at 11:07 AM, Monica Moynihan <monicaperkal@...> wrote:

Manuel,

I like your post, a lot. I personally experience the same situation when trying to price out an older Porsche (it would have been my 3rd. I owned a 944 when I was 20 years old that I got for for a mere 7k (a steal at the time in 91') and then later a 911 convertible from the 90s. Honestly, my 944 was more fun, or maybe it was just my twenty year old self. I see crazy prices for these cars now. I tried to find a reasonable 928 from the late 80s. (My son says 944 suck.) I considered getting a 928 for myself and for my son who caught the classic car bug...they just sit in garages at prices of a Bentley lol. Good thing I didn't get it....he's now a Corvette fan. (Ha!)

On a Nagel note, I would love to know what prices you would be willing to sell your "Mask" and "Standing Lady" for. What is your bottom line? Please tell us. I happen to know a couple of collectors that want BOTH and one I know pays premium prices.

So what is the price you would let them go for? 

I personally picked up a Mask two weeks ago myself. I will share some photos in a separate post later. "Mask" deserves its own post. She is definitely beautiful and I am happy to hear you have one. Actually "Mask" does not get talked about much, probably because we never see it come up for sale. Besides myself I only knew of one other that had one and it was unsigned. 

Monica 



On Wed, Oct 16, 2019 at 6:36 AM Manuel Rodriguez <mannyar@...> wrote:
Rob, loved your book and this analysis of Nagel's art. I have to disagree with the valuation of Nagel art, however. I own several 10-30 year old rare Corvettes in addition to many limited Nagel serigraphs. The Corvette market is full of individuals who refuse to sell their low mileage Corvettes for less than exorbitant prices. These Corvettes sit in garages acquiring dust for decades, eventually to be sold by their offspring after their death for a fraction of the price they were originally priced at. Many articles in sports car magazines have noticed this trend, as Corvettes that are not driven, sold or bought. No one touches them. Just because the Nagel marketplace has markedly turned up in value does not mean that anyone is actually purchasing these ridiculously priced prints. These prints may languish at these price points, unsold and unpurchased, just like their limited edition Corvette brethren. I own Standing Lady and Mask, and I dare say that no one on these boards will pay me the premium valuations that I believe they deserve. We who love Nagel will continue to relish these images, but I'm not sure that real valuations are climbing.  

On Mon, Oct 14, 2019 at 3:38 PM robfrankel <rob@...> wrote:

Greetings:

Just a quick update on the Nagel world in general and the book particular:

The first pressing of The Artist Who Loved Women has just about sold out, prompting me to question whether a second pressing is warranted.  I've decided to move forward with a second edition, for a couple of reasons:

First, although I do profit from sales, the revenue generated is not exactly life-changing money.  When I began work on the book, it was very much an extension of my career in which as a consultant, I would provide effective brand strategies to launch funded start-ups and to turn around existing companies whose brands were languishing and hemorrhaging market share.  My thinking was that Patrick Nagel was the latter, a mature, stagnant, languishing brand that was dying of neglect.  I felt that with the right strategy and execution, the Nagel brand (and both its cultural and investment value) could be revitalized.

The first step toward that revitalization would be a book that educated the public as to who and what Patrick Nagel was.  Even now, far more people know Nagel's work than know his name, but we're making progress on that front.  I'd like to think the book has helped nudge that process along.

The second step toward securing Nagel's place in the annals of art would be to see the book made into a movie, if only because far more people stream their entertainment than turn pages of a book.  A cinematic feature eclipses a book's awareness by several orders of magnitude, in a much shorter span of time.  I live in Los Angeles, where movies are still a big business.  But to be candid, I'm a poor fit for that industry, and so my best shot at the brand finding its way into the movie industry is for someone else to discover the book and get it into the proper channels for production.  For someone to discover the book, there has to be a supply of books, which necessitates more copies in circulation.

Perhaps it's coincidence, but we've all watched Nagel's work increase in value significantly at the same time as the book's publication.  As far as I'm concerned, this is the book's chicken soup effect:  It may not be helping, but it certainly can't be hurting.  Collectible serigraphs, original illustrations and canvas pieces have all performed well over the last five years and I see no reason why that activity should stop.  Over that same period of time, the supply of collectible Nagel art has almost dried up at popular and higher-end auction houses.  Of the collectible pieces I do see, most are premium priced, offered by sellers who are adamant about their value.

I also notice that sales of the book, while not in the millions, are consistent throughout the year, with the obvious bump during the Christmas season.  To an old marketing eye, that signifies a strong, steady, growing interest in Nagel, and that's exactly what we want.  Another piece of interesting data is that the book's Instagram account is split amongst Millennials and Boomers, confirming that interest in Patrick Nagel is not merely sentimental, but truly accepted by a growing generation who recognizes and values his work on their own terms.

These are all encouraging signs, and so my mission continues.  Thanks to all who have purchased the book and continue to support Patrick Nagel's legacy.

Rob Frankel
TheArtistWhoLovedWomen.com








--
Monica Moynihan Perkal 
Realtor, Top Producing Luxury Agent
Pinnacle Estate Properties, Inc.
24025 Park Sorrento, #110 
Calabasas, CA 91302
(310) 429-2255 I DRE #01366039
"I Can Move Mountains..."

Confidentiality Notice: The contents of this electronic transmission including any attached documents may contain confidential and/or privileged information and/or legal work product protected by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act. This electronic transmission is solely for the use of the intended recipient(s). Unauthorized interception, review, use, disclosure, copying, distribution or dissemination of the information is prohibited and may violate applicable laws. If you have received this transmission in error, please notify the sender immediately by reply email or phone and then immediately delete this message. Thank you.



Manuel Rodriguez
 

Monica: 

I really enjoyed the connection between 944’s, 928’s, and Nagel. Icons of an era. The 944 and 928 were gorgeous cars that many of us idolized, even if they were prone to breaking down. I, too, later owned a 911 which NEVER broke down, but was not as iconic as the 928. Yes, many of these Porsches also remain, unsold, un-driven, and never bought. I believe these cars and Nagels were representative of an era, and mean much more to many of us from that generation because of their identification with that specific era. They will likely not have that status to successive generations. 

Unfortunately, Nagel’s body of work is so limited, and he died so young, that it is difficult to see how his status will grow appreciably to later generations to justify the current (and trending) pricing. I completely agree with Rob that a significant percentage of these serigraphs have been destroyed due to their inherent characteristics and the feeble paper they were printed on, meaning that his body of work is even more limited and less accessible to succeeding generations. This will necessarily limit his popularity. 

Case in point is your acknowledgement of Mask and Standing Lady. Few people have ever seen one, much less owned one. I am fortunate to own both, especially Mask. I have never seen another. It is a surreal image that conveys the utter deception and false projections that exist at the center of every human being. I imagine that’s why Nagel called it “Mask”.  

I regret having sold only one Nagel I owned, Gray Lady. Sold Carol and Venetian Blinds. Venetian was gorgeous but I felt very little looking at it. I still own an unsigned Black and White Robe that was in Nagel’s collection at his death. It is authentic and has the Wasserman imprint on it. The lack of signature means very little to me. 

I might consider letting go of Standing Lady in trade/barter for Invitation, the only image I still desire. I have never seen one and neither has anyone I know. Again, Rob’s premise that so many of these have been destroyed is completely correct. Nagel’s work was extremely popular in California, and that state suffers from myriad natural disasters. 

Unfortunately, Mask is the only image I will never sell, unless I am living under a bridge. She is still bright, museum mounted (and hinged) and under special plexi, keeping her very sensitive colors bright. I had her framed myself. No sunlight touches that image. No one that I know has any idea that Standing Lady and Mask are special, extremely rare images. Most people I know believe they are inexpensive posters. I laugh when they ask me what they are.  

Call me at 786-223-7333 if you want to discuss further, especially some additional rare images that I own. I really enjoy your posts here. You and Rob must have a sensational collection. 

Thanks, 

Manny



 
 

On Oct 16, 2019, at 11:07 AM, Monica Moynihan <monicaperkal@...> wrote:

Manuel,

I like your post, a lot. I personally experience the same situation when trying to price out an older Porsche (it would have been my 3rd. I owned a 944 when I was 20 years old that I got for for a mere 7k (a steal at the time in 91') and then later a 911 convertible from the 90s. Honestly, my 944 was more fun, or maybe it was just my twenty year old self. I see crazy prices for these cars now. I tried to find a reasonable 928 from the late 80s. (My son says 944 suck.) I considered getting a 928 for myself and for my son who caught the classic car bug...they just sit in garages at prices of a Bentley lol. Good thing I didn't get it....he's now a Corvette fan. (Ha!)

On a Nagel note, I would love to know what prices you would be willing to sell your "Mask" and "Standing Lady" for. What is your bottom line? Please tell us. I happen to know a couple of collectors that want BOTH and one I know pays premium prices.

So what is the price you would let them go for? 

I personally picked up a Mask two weeks ago myself. I will share some photos in a separate post later. "Mask" deserves its own post. She is definitely beautiful and I am happy to hear you have one. Actually "Mask" does not get talked about much, probably because we never see it come up for sale. Besides myself I only knew of one other that had one and it was unsigned. 

Monica 



On Wed, Oct 16, 2019 at 6:36 AM Manuel Rodriguez <mannyar@...> wrote:
Rob, loved your book and this analysis of Nagel's art. I have to disagree with the valuation of Nagel art, however. I own several 10-30 year old rare Corvettes in addition to many limited Nagel serigraphs. The Corvette market is full of individuals who refuse to sell their low mileage Corvettes for less than exorbitant prices. These Corvettes sit in garages acquiring dust for decades, eventually to be sold by their offspring after their death for a fraction of the price they were originally priced at. Many articles in sports car magazines have noticed this trend, as Corvettes that are not driven, sold or bought. No one touches them. Just because the Nagel marketplace has markedly turned up in value does not mean that anyone is actually purchasing these ridiculously priced prints. These prints may languish at these price points, unsold and unpurchased, just like their limited edition Corvette brethren. I own Standing Lady and Mask, and I dare say that no one on these boards will pay me the premium valuations that I believe they deserve. We who love Nagel will continue to relish these images, but I'm not sure that real valuations are climbing.  

On Mon, Oct 14, 2019 at 3:38 PM robfrankel <rob@...> wrote:

Greetings:

Just a quick update on the Nagel world in general and the book particular:

The first pressing of The Artist Who Loved Women has just about sold out, prompting me to question whether a second pressing is warranted.  I've decided to move forward with a second edition, for a couple of reasons:

First, although I do profit from sales, the revenue generated is not exactly life-changing money.  When I began work on the book, it was very much an extension of my career in which as a consultant, I would provide effective brand strategies to launch funded start-ups and to turn around existing companies whose brands were languishing and hemorrhaging market share.  My thinking was that Patrick Nagel was the latter, a mature, stagnant, languishing brand that was dying of neglect.  I felt that with the right strategy and execution, the Nagel brand (and both its cultural and investment value) could be revitalized.

The first step toward that revitalization would be a book that educated the public as to who and what Patrick Nagel was.  Even now, far more people know Nagel's work than know his name, but we're making progress on that front.  I'd like to think the book has helped nudge that process along.

The second step toward securing Nagel's place in the annals of art would be to see the book made into a movie, if only because far more people stream their entertainment than turn pages of a book.  A cinematic feature eclipses a book's awareness by several orders of magnitude, in a much shorter span of time.  I live in Los Angeles, where movies are still a big business.  But to be candid, I'm a poor fit for that industry, and so my best shot at the brand finding its way into the movie industry is for someone else to discover the book and get it into the proper channels for production.  For someone to discover the book, there has to be a supply of books, which necessitates more copies in circulation.

Perhaps it's coincidence, but we've all watched Nagel's work increase in value significantly at the same time as the book's publication.  As far as I'm concerned, this is the book's chicken soup effect:  It may not be helping, but it certainly can't be hurting.  Collectible serigraphs, original illustrations and canvas pieces have all performed well over the last five years and I see no reason why that activity should stop.  Over that same period of time, the supply of collectible Nagel art has almost dried up at popular and higher-end auction houses.  Of the collectible pieces I do see, most are premium priced, offered by sellers who are adamant about their value.

I also notice that sales of the book, while not in the millions, are consistent throughout the year, with the obvious bump during the Christmas season.  To an old marketing eye, that signifies a strong, steady, growing interest in Nagel, and that's exactly what we want.  Another piece of interesting data is that the book's Instagram account is split amongst Millennials and Boomers, confirming that interest in Patrick Nagel is not merely sentimental, but truly accepted by a growing generation who recognizes and values his work on their own terms.

These are all encouraging signs, and so my mission continues.  Thanks to all who have purchased the book and continue to support Patrick Nagel's legacy.

Rob Frankel
TheArtistWhoLovedWomen.com








-- 
Monica Moynihan Perkal 
Realtor, Top Producing Luxury Agent
Pinnacle Estate Properties, Inc.
24025 Park Sorrento, #110 
Calabasas, CA 91302
(310) 429-2255 I DRE #01366039
"I Can Move Mountains..."

Confidentiality Notice: The contents of this electronic transmission including any attached documents may contain confidential and/or privileged information and/or legal work product protected by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act. This electronic transmission is solely for the use of the intended recipient(s). Unauthorized interception, review, use, disclosure, copying, distribution or dissemination of the information is prohibited and may violate applicable laws. If you have received this transmission in error, please notify the sender immediately by reply email or phone and then immediately delete this message. Thank you.



Manuel Rodriguez
 

Rob: 

Love your posts. The analysis is always exquisite and insightful. You and Monica and a few others whose names escape me are always on the cutting edge of the Nagel marketplace. 

It’s funny, but I do have a good many Nagel images in the proverbial “under the bed” stash. I just can’t display too many and don’t want my entire apartment to become an ode to Nagel. I might have been a Nagel hoarder 30 years ago. Now I just keep my favorite 50. I haven’t purchased a Nagel in 25 years. Most originals that come to market are simply too small for my visual enjoyment, and the larger originals are too expensive to justify. 

You might be entirely correct in your analysis, and your observations regarding trending pricing is correct. I still believe, though, that so many iconic and generational collectibles of our generation will die along with us. I have a 1978 Corvette that I couldn’t give away at this point. So I keep it. 

Please keep posting your insights and observations. You and Monica and a few others truly make this forum worth reading. 

Manny

On Oct 16, 2019, at 10:38 AM, robfrankel <rob@...> wrote:

Hi Manuel:

Other than drooling over them, I am completely unqualified to comment on Corvettes. I do, however, stand by my comments about Nagel valuations, for a couple of reasons:

First, we have facts in plentiful supply.  The collectible serigraphs and originals have all increased substantially in value since their lows.  As little as five years ago, one could pick up a collectible serigraph in pristine condition for anywhere between US$150 and US$350.  Today, those pieces are selling -- and I mean people selling and buying them -- for ten times that amount.  Canvases, which are in extremely limited supply, have performed in much the same way: pieces that were sold for US$10K to US$25K are also being purchased for ten times those prices.

Second, there are always hoarders in every market.  Throughout my Nagel experience, whenever I've mingled with those who supposedly knew or knew of any of the characters from the Nagel era, there's always been one or two posers who claim to have "a bunch of his pieces under my bed at home."  Every time I've followed up with them, they -- along with their claims -- have simply evaporated.

Third, we know that a large number of Nagel serigraphs in particular have been damaged, discarded or destroyed.  Nobody knows for sure, and I accept my estimate is not factually verified, but every indication is that an average of 30% are still in collectible condition, especially when you look at the marketplace, where the supply of those pieces has been eviscerated.  So to my way of thinking, even if they're parked in garages, their values are still growing in the same way the Corvettes are -- especially the split rear window limited editions.

Finally, one could argue that going forward, the younger class of Nagel fans may actually drive values higher as they begin to trade their youthful idealism for financial stability and begin to generate more  disposable cash.  For some, an investment into "quality" art will become an option and Nagel serigraphs, due to their relative affordability, could be among their initial indulgences.

So from the 100,000 foot level, I see all indicators pointing in the right direction.  As with Corvettes, your mileage may vary.....

Rob Frankel
TheArtistWhoLovedWomen.com


 

Manny:

Thanks for your thoughtful comments. I agree that some collectibles are timely and then are lost to the ages of generations who no longer share the same values. I find myself overloaded with fine crystal and silver pieces that my previous family generations valued greatly, yet my children's generation find little use for. At one time, fine cut crystal and sterling silver settings were highly regarded; now apparently, not so much. That doesn't necessarily mean it's worth less, it's just harder to find a buyer at this point.  Fashion being fickle, there's no reason to dump it.  As my grandmother used to say, "It doesn't ask for food."

However, I have always been a long-ball player and have seen/read enough to know that in most case, once there's a market, there's usually always a market, although it may vary in size over time.  Art, as you know, is very much like that. When I was younger, Norman Rockwell was considered something of a square, bourgeois illustrator.  I walked into a gallery and saw a canvas of his selling for US$20,000 or so.  That same piece sells in the very high six figures today.

Also, as a note, the paper on which collectible serigraphs were printed are very high quality.  You can bet on that, because at least the Wasserman productions were a reflection of Jeff Wasserman's steadfast commitment to ethics and quality.  As one of the last survivors of the Nagel era, Jeff remains a solid guy, true to his word and his craft.  So I have no issues with the papers -- or inks -- he used.  Somper was another story entirely.  If there were anyone who would cut corners, it would likely be him, but the only piece I own of his seems to be bearing up well.

Rob Frankel
TheArtistWhoLovedWomen.com

Monica Moynihan
 

Manuel,

I will now create a Mask post for all of us who want to share Masks. The lip color of mine looks the same, Nagel did not use a bright color. Yours looks beautiful. Did you come up with your selling price for them or are you keeping them? :-) 

Monica 

On Thu, Oct 17, 2019 at 7:22 AM robfrankel <rob@...> wrote:
Manny:

Thanks for your thoughtful comments. I agree that some collectibles are timely and then are lost to the ages of generations who no longer share the same values. I find myself overloaded with fine crystal and silver pieces that my previous family generations valued greatly, yet my children's generation find little use for. At one time, fine cut crystal and sterling silver settings were highly regarded; now apparently, not so much. That doesn't necessarily mean it's worth less, it's just harder to find a buyer at this point.  Fashion being fickle, there's no reason to dump it.  As my grandmother used to say, "It doesn't ask for food."

However, I have always been a long-ball player and have seen/read enough to know that in most case, once there's a market, there's usually always a market, although it may vary in size over time.  Art, as you know, is very much like that. When I was younger, Norman Rockwell was considered something of a square, bourgeois illustrator.  I walked into a gallery and saw a canvas of his selling for US$20,000 or so.  That same piece sells in the very high six figures today.

Also, as a note, the paper on which collectible serigraphs were printed are very high quality.  You can bet on that, because at least the Wasserman productions were a reflection of Jeff Wasserman's steadfast commitment to ethics and quality.  As one of the last survivors of the Nagel era, Jeff remains a solid guy, true to his word and his craft.  So I have no issues with the papers -- or inks -- he used.  Somper was another story entirely.  If there were anyone who would cut corners, it would likely be him, but the only piece I own of his seems to be bearing up well.

Rob Frankel
TheArtistWhoLovedWomen.com



--
Monica Moynihan Perkal 
Realtor, Top Producing Luxury Agent
Pinnacle Estate Properties, Inc.
24025 Park Sorrento, #110 
Calabasas, CA 91302
(310) 429-2255 I DRE #01366039
"I Can Move Mountains..."

Confidentiality Notice: The contents of this electronic transmission including any attached documents may contain confidential and/or privileged information and/or legal work product protected by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act. This electronic transmission is solely for the use of the intended recipient(s). Unauthorized interception, review, use, disclosure, copying, distribution or dissemination of the information is prohibited and may violate applicable laws. If you have received this transmission in error, please notify the sender immediately by reply email or phone and then immediately delete this message. Thank you.


Manuel Rodriguez
 

Monica: 

Can’t wait to see some more images here. Please post some rarities we never see. I am sure you have many. 

I don’t believe I’ll ever sell these two. They took decades to find. 

One interesting observation: small Nagel acrylics are rather common and not as interesting in that they are quite small. Their image value is limited. The larger originals are quite beautiful yet too expensive to justify. Most Nagel serigraph body images are, to me, not as interesting as Nagel’s large, facial images, i.e., Cleo, Mask, Kristen, Invitation, Collectors and Michelle. You will find MANY small acrylics in circulation before you see these limiteds being offered for sale. Who here owns Invitation or has even seen one? I am missing that one, still. I know of many small acrylics circulating. The body images are fine, Lori, Gray Lady, etc., but it is the large facial images that are quite rare and never surface. Standing Lady defies this trend because she is 6 feet tall. 

Monica, please post some of your images from your collection.

Rob, I believe there was some conversation earlier regarding Ship’s outside upper-mat cut. I checked my framed piece, and it has the same issue, the upper border was purposely cut irregularly, requiring Ship to be matted irregularly, which looks quite odd. It’s still a great image, though. 

Have a great weekend guys. Its time for a scotch, or two. 

Manny

  

On Oct 17, 2019, at 1:10 PM, Monica Moynihan <monicaperkal@...> wrote:

Manuel,

I will now create a Mask post for all of us who want to share Masks. The lip color of mine looks the same, Nagel did not use a bright color. Yours looks beautiful. Did you come up with your selling price for them or are you keeping them? :-) 

Monica 

On Thu, Oct 17, 2019 at 7:22 AM robfrankel <rob@...> wrote:
Manny:

Thanks for your thoughtful comments. I agree that some collectibles are timely and then are lost to the ages of generations who no longer share the same values. I find myself overloaded with fine crystal and silver pieces that my previous family generations valued greatly, yet my children's generation find little use for. At one time, fine cut crystal and sterling silver settings were highly regarded; now apparently, not so much. That doesn't necessarily mean it's worth less, it's just harder to find a buyer at this point.  Fashion being fickle, there's no reason to dump it.  As my grandmother used to say, "It doesn't ask for food."

However, I have always been a long-ball player and have seen/read enough to know that in most case, once there's a market, there's usually always a market, although it may vary in size over time.  Art, as you know, is very much like that. When I was younger, Norman Rockwell was considered something of a square, bourgeois illustrator.  I walked into a gallery and saw a canvas of his selling for US$20,000 or so.  That same piece sells in the very high six figures today.

Also, as a note, the paper on which collectible serigraphs were printed are very high quality.  You can bet on that, because at least the Wasserman productions were a reflection of Jeff Wasserman's steadfast commitment to ethics and quality.  As one of the last survivors of the Nagel era, Jeff remains a solid guy, true to his word and his craft.  So I have no issues with the papers -- or inks -- he used.  Somper was another story entirely.  If there were anyone who would cut corners, it would likely be him, but the only piece I own of his seems to be bearing up well.

Rob Frankel
TheArtistWhoLovedWomen.com




-- 
Monica Moynihan Perkal 
Realtor, Top Producing Luxury Agent
Pinnacle Estate Properties, Inc.
24025 Park Sorrento, #110 
Calabasas, CA 91302
(310) 429-2255 I DRE #01366039
"I Can Move Mountains..."

Confidentiality Notice: The contents of this electronic transmission including any attached documents may contain confidential and/or privileged information and/or legal work product protected by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act. This electronic transmission is solely for the use of the intended recipient(s). Unauthorized interception, review, use, disclosure, copying, distribution or dissemination of the information is prohibited and may violate applicable laws. If you have received this transmission in error, please notify the sender immediately by reply email or phone and then immediately delete this message. Thank you.



Monica Moynihan
 

Manuel,

Thank you for all your great insight as well and your encouragement as I am actually a very late bloomer collector. I will be in touch to learn more about your "under the bed stash". And yes, Rob and I have had some luck. He much much more than I in collecting but thats his story to tell! I'm jealous.

I am just thankful to have had a change to afford some Nagels in my lifetime and bring my youth back in anyway I can!  We also have Rob to thank for his contribution, which is what this post is really about and bringing more "Nagel News" and information to real collectors and young novice collectors alike. Bottom line is Patrick has brought us all together too. Have a good weekend and please refer to my post for photos on MASK. 

Monica