Date   

Re: Bill of Materials for both versions of SSNA

N5IB
 

I had the BOM down for a bit just to update the date and a version number so folks can keep straight what they are working from. rev5.01 is dated 31 October.  It's back up now.


No changes were made in the parts info itself, just date and version.


Jim, N5IB


Bill of Materials for both versions of SSNA

Mike Hall
 

Jim, are you updating the bill of materials for both versions of the SSNA? Don't see it in the files list now.


Re: J2, J3, J4 in PM BOM

Mike Hall
 

Thanks Jim!



---In phsna@..., <n5ib@...> wrote:

I fixed that part number and reposted as rev1.21

Chalk that up to MicroSoft's autocomplete "feature"


If you already have either shells or pins and are buying the other, be sure they match. The little retainer tab on the pins won't match other varieties of shells.


Jim, N5IB


---In PHSNA@..., <phsna@...> wrote:
The part number for the shell of the connectors is for a capacitor (C6 and C7) and not the connector shell.
Anyone got the correct part number?


Building the power meter

N5IB
 

One important thing to remember about the AD8307 rf detector is that it is VERY sensitive. It will measure down around -70 dBm, which is one ten-billionth of a watt! Or 71 millionths of a volt.

So you have to take extra special care to keep stray rf away from it. First and foremost is a VERY well shielded enclosure. One of those cast aluminum boxes is probably best, but the "minibox" style will be OK if the halves fit tightly together. I used an "Altoids tin on steroids" with a tight fitting slip-on lid, from PaperMart.com.

Anything coming into the box (other than the signal, of course) needs to be well bypassed for rf, hence the posts you've read recently about feedthru capacitors.
Best bet is to keep the power supply (battery) inside the box. Then the only other penetrations are for input signal and DC out to the Arduino. You can probably get away without a feedthru cap for the dc output if you use an rf type connector and bypass it very close to the box wall with a couple of caps, maybe a 0.001 uF in parallel with a 0.1 uF There is another bypass cap on the PC board, but don't rely on that one.

If you use an analog meter with yours, the meter represents a big hole in the box (unless its one of those great mil surplus full-metal-jacket types). For a plastic meter, maybe some copper foil tape or real aluminum foil duct tape can be applied to the back to cover most of the gaps.

Jim, N5IB


Re: J2, J3, J4 in PM BOM

N5IB
 

I fixed that part number and reposted as rev1.21

Chalk that up to MicroSoft's autocomplete "feature"


If you already have either shells or pins and are buying the other, be sure they match. The little retainer tab on the pins won't match other varieties of shells.


Jim, N5IB


---In PHSNA@..., <phsna@...> wrote:
The part number for the shell of the connectors is for a capacitor (C6 and C7) and not the connector shell.
Anyone got the correct part number?


J2, J3, J4 in PM BOM

Mike Hall
 

The part number for the shell of the connectors is for a capacitor (C6 and C7) and not the connector shell.

Anyone got the correct part number?


Boards arrived in WA state today

Jim Pruitt <wa7duy@...>
 

The pc boards arrive here in central Washington today in good shape.
 
Thank you.
 


Boards arrived

dualraoul
 

The boards are here in Nebraska, nicely done! No extra postage due.

Thanks
Ron
K0IDT


Re: Postal Alert - SSNA to CONUS addresses

Doug Phillips
 

Boards arrived here in the Seattle area today no extra postage 

Thanks much Jim     Doug W7RDP



On Oct 26, 2013, at 10:26, n5ib@... wrote:

 

It seems USPS is like the IRS - it gives conflicting answers to simple questions.

Yesterday when I mailed the bulk of the USA orders (the one or two combos) I made a point to show the clerk that it was a relatively rigid envelope that probably needed the "non-machine-sortable" rate. The clerk concurred and we mailed about 40. When I mailed a late one today at a different post office I pointed out the same feature and was told it should go a the parcel rate, about a buck higher.

So who knows... I hope you guys don't get charged postage due - the worst part being having to go to the post office to pick it up. Please give me a status heads-up when the first few arrive.

The DX orders, and the CONUS for more than 2 boards went parcel anyway, so no problems expected there.

Jim, N5IB


Ordering Parts from Mouser

Jerry Haigwood
 

Hi All,

     Some of you know this trick but I am sure others do not so here it is.  When ordering small parts from Mouser, do it by phone and ask the sales representative to ship via 1ST class USPS mail.  That will save you a bunch of money on shipping.  You will not find that option on the web site but they will happily do that for you.  I live in Texas so I have to pay taxes on the purchase.  But, at least the shipping cost is low.

    I have not inquired about shipping via USPS for foreign orders.  So, someone from ZL, VK or G land can ask Mouser about that..

Jerry W5JH

"building something without experimenting is just solder practice"

 


Re: Postal Alert - SSNA to CONUS addresses

Preston Shute <prestonshute@...>
 

Mine arrived a few days ago, no extra postage and the boards were in very good shape. The quality of the board itself was excellent.

Has any one posted a parts list?
My junk box went the way of much of my stuff in our house fire Thanksgiving 2009 so I will be purchasing just about everything.

Thanks again to those who put forth all the time and work so we might enjoy this project.

Preston Shute, wd4dda


Re: Building the Simple Scalar Network Analyzer

Gene Dorcas <gene@...>
 

Thanks a million.  I’ll order some immediately.  Of course you know what will happen.  After I buy some I’ll find my old supply of them.  Hi Hi

 

From: PHSNA@... [mailto:PHSNA@...] On Behalf Of john lawson
Sent: Wednesday, October 30, 2013 9:08 AM
To: PHSNA@...
Subject: Re: [PHSNA] Building the Simple Scalar Network Analyzer

 

 

Gene, Max-Gain Systems carries 5000 pf feed thru caps at around .75 cents or so each. However, they are kinda hard to find on their site....Here is the link

 

 

The page that comes up is titled Door Knob Caps......just scroll down near the very bottom and you'll find those feedthru caps at 5000pf.....they are mil. spec pulls.....I have some and they appear to be very high quality feed thrus and even include the mounting hardware......hope this helps, Good luck with your project, John K5IRK

 

On Wednesday, October 30, 2013 1:06 AM, Gene Dorcas <gene@...> wrote:

 

Thanks so much for guiding us along the way.  I’ll start on my power meter(s) tomorrow.

 

Would you believe I spent 2 hrs today looking for  feed-thru caps.  I’ve used from a little bag of .001 feed-thru caps for years and of course, you know it, now I can’t find them. Isn’t that just the way it goes sometimes.  Hi Hi

 

Thanks again,

Gene, W5DOR

 

 

From: PHSNA@... [mailto:PHSNA@...] On Behalf Of Jerry Haigwood
Sent: Tuesday, October 29, 2013 11:47 PM
To: PHSNA@...
Subject: [PHSNA] Building the Simple Scalar Network Analyzer

 

 

Hi All,

    Now that a lot of you have your boards, you will probably want to get building.  There is a preferred building sequence that will help you test your system as you build.  First, build the power meter.  Calibrate it and set the voltage output to produce +5.0 VDC MAX at -10dbm.  On my power meter, the output is set a little lower.  The maximum input to the UNO R3 is +5.0 VDC.  Anymore and you run the risk of damaging the UNO. So, my meter is set at 4.55 VDC for -10 dbm.  When you guys get to the calibration point, there are several ways to do it based upon the equipment you have.  If you have access to a HP8640B generator or other high quality generator, you can use it to do the calibration.  Or if you have a good 5 watt power meter and a QRP transmitter, you can use them.  There are a lot of different ways to do the calibration.  We will be discussing them with you.

    Once the power meter is built and operational, you can then build the SSNA.  Before you build the SSNA, try downloading the software, compiling it and installing it on your UNO R3.  That will give your little computer a quick test.  Actually, this test can be done anytime.  After building the “shield” board (the board that plugs into the computer), decide where you want to take the output from the DDS board.  Jim, has written up some options for you.  Depending on where you extract the output, you may have to modify T1 on the shield board.  More on that later.  You will be able to test the output level of your SSNA using your power meter.  You will be able to set the calibration of the DDS by using a well calibrated Frequency meter or by listen for zero beat against WWV on a receiver. 

    If we can get everyone to follow this build sequence, we can help one another, as a group, to succeed.

Jerry W5JH

"building something without experimenting is just solder practice"

 

 


Re: Building the Simple Scalar Network Analyzer

Paul Schumacher
 

Jerry,

I found this on the power meter, meters and calibration.  It is from "rf workbench" 

It may be of help to us.

It built the crystal calibrate source, but resistor R  turned out to be 47 k rather than 200 ohms!

Paul K0ZYV

 



---In PHSNA@..., <phsna@...> wrote:

Hi All,

    Now that a lot of you have your boards, you will probably want to get building.  There is a preferred building sequence that will help you test your system as you build.  First, build the power meter.  Calibrate it and set the voltage output to produce +5.0 VDC MAX at -10dbm.  On my power meter, the output is set a little lower.  The maximum input to the UNO R3 is +5.0 VDC.  Anymore and you run the risk of damaging the UNO. So, my meter is set at 4.55 VDC for -10 dbm.  When you guys get to the calibration point, there are several ways to do it based upon the equipment you have.  If you have access to a HP8640B generator or other high quality generator, you can use it to do the calibration.  Or if you have a good 5 watt power meter and a QRP transmitter, you can use them.  There are a lot of different ways to do the calibration.  We will be discussing them with you.

    Once the power meter is built and operational, you can then build the SSNA.  Before you build the SSNA, try downloading the software, compiling it and installing it on your UNO R3.  That will give your little computer a quick test.  Actually, this test can be done anytime.  After building the “shield” board (the board that plugs into the computer), decide where you want to take the output from the DDS board.  Jim, has written up some options for you.  Depending on where you extract the output, you may have to modify T1 on the shield board.  More on that later.  You will be able to test the output level of your SSNA using your power meter.  You will be able to set the calibration of the DDS by using a well calibrated Frequency meter or by listen for zero beat against WWV on a receiver. 

    If we can get everyone to follow this build sequence, we can help one another, as a group, to succeed.

Jerry W5JH

"building something without experimenting is just solder practice"

 


Re: Building the Simple Scalar Network Analyzer

Michael McShan <n5jky@...>
 

I got 40 15 nF feed-through caps for $7.19 from this Ebay vendor:


Smooth transaction with no problems.

73,
Mike N5JKY
OK City

On Oct 30, 2013, at 9:07 AM, john lawson <jmlcs2000@...> wrote:


Gene, Max-Gain Systems carries 5000 pf feed thru caps at around .75 cents or so each. However, they are kinda hard to find on their site....Here is the link
 
 
The page that comes up is titled Door Knob Caps......just scroll down near the very bottom and you'll find those feedthru caps at 5000pf.....they are mil. spec pulls.....I have some and they appear to be very high quality feed thrus and even include the mounting hardware......hope this helps, Good luck with your project, John K5IRK


On Wednesday, October 30, 2013 1:06 AM, Gene Dorcas <gene@...> wrote:
 
Thanks so much for guiding us along the way.  I’ll start on my power meter(s) tomorrow.
 
Would you believe I spent 2 hrs today looking for  feed-thru caps.  I’ve used from a little bag of .001 feed-thru caps for years and of course, you know it, now I can’t find them. Isn’t that just the way it goes sometimes.  Hi Hi
 
Thanks again,
Gene, W5DOR
 
 
From: PHSNA@... [mailto:PHSNA@...] On Behalf Of Jerry Haigwood
Sent: Tuesday, October 29, 2013 11:47 PM
To: PHSNA@...
Subject: [PHSNA] Building the Simple Scalar Network Analyzer
 
 
Hi All,
    Now that a lot of you have your boards, you will probably want to get building.  There is a preferred building sequence that will help you test your system as you build.  First, build the power meter.  Calibrate it and set the voltage output to produce +5.0 VDC MAX at -10dbm.  On my power meter, the output is set a little lower.  The maximum input to the UNO R3 is +5.0 VDC.  Anymore and you run the risk of damaging the UNO. So, my meter is set at 4.55 VDC for -10 dbm.  When you guys get to the calibration point, there are several ways to do it based upon the equipment you have.  If you have access to a HP8640B generator or other high quality generator, you can use it to do the calibration.  Or if you have a good 5 watt power meter and a QRP transmitter, you can use them.  There are a lot of different ways to do the calibration.  We will be discussing them with you.
    Once the power meter is built and operational, you can then build the SSNA.  Before you build the SSNA, try downloading the software, compiling it and installing it on your UNO R3.  That will give your little computer a quick test.  Actually, this test can be done anytime.  After building the “shield” board (the board that plugs into the computer), decide where you want to take the output from the DDS board.  Jim, has written up some options for you.  Depending on where you extract the output, you may have to modify T1 on the shield board.  More on that later.  You will be able to test the output level of your SSNA using your power meter.  You will be able to set the calibration of the DDS by using a well calibrated Frequency meter or by listen for zero beat against WWV on a receiver. 
    If we can get everyone to follow this build sequence, we can help one another, as a group, to succeed.
Jerry W5JH
"building something without experimenting is just solder practice"
 





Re: Building the Simple Scalar Network Analyzer

John Lawson
 

Gene, Max-Gain Systems carries 5000 pf feed thru caps at around .75 cents or so each. However, they are kinda hard to find on their site....Here is the link
 
 
The page that comes up is titled Door Knob Caps......just scroll down near the very bottom and you'll find those feedthru caps at 5000pf.....they are mil. spec pulls.....I have some and they appear to be very high quality feed thrus and even include the mounting hardware......hope this helps, Good luck with your project, John K5IRK


On Wednesday, October 30, 2013 1:06 AM, Gene Dorcas wrote:
 
Thanks so much for guiding us along the way.  I’ll start on my power meter(s) tomorrow.
 
Would you believe I spent 2 hrs today looking for  feed-thru caps.  I’ve used from a little bag of .001 feed-thru caps for years and of course, you know it, now I can’t find them. Isn’t that just the way it goes sometimes.  Hi Hi
 
Thanks again,
Gene, W5DOR
 
 
From: PHSNA@... [mailto:PHSNA@...] On Behalf Of Jerry Haigwood
Sent: Tuesday, October 29, 2013 11:47 PM
To: PHSNA@...
Subject: [PHSNA] Building the Simple Scalar Network Analyzer
 
 
Hi All,
    Now that a lot of you have your boards, you will probably want to get building.  There is a preferred building sequence that will help you test your system as you build.  First, build the power meter.  Calibrate it and set the voltage output to produce +5.0 VDC MAX at -10dbm.  On my power meter, the output is set a little lower.  The maximum input to the UNO R3 is +5.0 VDC.  Anymore and you run the risk of damaging the UNO. So, my meter is set at 4.55 VDC for -10 dbm.  When you guys get to the calibration point, there are several ways to do it based upon the equipment you have.  If you have access to a HP8640B generator or other high quality generator, you can use it to do the calibration.  Or if you have a good 5 watt power meter and a QRP transmitter, you can use them.  There are a lot of different ways to do the calibration.  We will be discussing them with you.
    Once the power meter is built and operational, you can then build the SSNA.  Before you build the SSNA, try downloading the software, compiling it and installing it on your UNO R3.  That will give your little computer a quick test.  Actually, this test can be done anytime.  After building the “shield” board (the board that plugs into the computer), decide where you want to take the output from the DDS board.  Jim, has written up some options for you.  Depending on where you extract the output, you may have to modify T1 on the shield board.  More on that later.  You will be able to test the output level of your SSNA using your power meter.  You will be able to set the calibration of the DDS by using a well calibrated Frequency meter or by listen for zero beat against WWV on a receiver. 
    If we can get everyone to follow this build sequence, we can help one another, as a group, to succeed.
Jerry W5JH
"building something without experimenting is just solder practice"
 



Re: Building the Simple Scalar Network Analyzer

Gene Dorcas <gene@...>
 

Thanks so much for guiding us along the way.  I’ll start on my power meter(s) tomorrow.

 

Would you believe I spent 2 hrs today looking for  feed-thru caps.  I’ve used from a little bag of .001 feed-thru caps for years and of course, you know it, now I can’t find them. Isn’t that just the way it goes sometimes.  Hi Hi

 

Thanks again,

Gene, W5DOR

gene@...

www.w5dor.com

 

 

From: PHSNA@... [mailto:PHSNA@...] On Behalf Of Jerry Haigwood
Sent: Tuesday, October 29, 2013 11:47 PM
To: PHSNA@...
Subject: [PHSNA] Building the Simple Scalar Network Analyzer

 

 

Hi All,

    Now that a lot of you have your boards, you will probably want to get building.  There is a preferred building sequence that will help you test your system as you build.  First, build the power meter.  Calibrate it and set the voltage output to produce +5.0 VDC MAX at -10dbm.  On my power meter, the output is set a little lower.  The maximum input to the UNO R3 is +5.0 VDC.  Anymore and you run the risk of damaging the UNO. So, my meter is set at 4.55 VDC for -10 dbm.  When you guys get to the calibration point, there are several ways to do it based upon the equipment you have.  If you have access to a HP8640B generator or other high quality generator, you can use it to do the calibration.  Or if you have a good 5 watt power meter and a QRP transmitter, you can use them.  There are a lot of different ways to do the calibration.  We will be discussing them with you.

    Once the power meter is built and operational, you can then build the SSNA.  Before you build the SSNA, try downloading the software, compiling it and installing it on your UNO R3.  That will give your little computer a quick test.  Actually, this test can be done anytime.  After building the “shield” board (the board that plugs into the computer), decide where you want to take the output from the DDS board.  Jim, has written up some options for you.  Depending on where you extract the output, you may have to modify T1 on the shield board.  More on that later.  You will be able to test the output level of your SSNA using your power meter.  You will be able to set the calibration of the DDS by using a well calibrated Frequency meter or by listen for zero beat against WWV on a receiver. 

    If we can get everyone to follow this build sequence, we can help one another, as a group, to succeed.

Jerry W5JH

"building something without experimenting is just solder practice"

 


Building the Simple Scalar Network Analyzer

Jerry Haigwood
 

Hi All,

    Now that a lot of you have your boards, you will probably want to get building.  There is a preferred building sequence that will help you test your system as you build.  First, build the power meter.  Calibrate it and set the voltage output to produce +5.0 VDC MAX at -10dbm.  On my power meter, the output is set a little lower.  The maximum input to the UNO R3 is +5.0 VDC.  Anymore and you run the risk of damaging the UNO. So, my meter is set at 4.55 VDC for -10 dbm.  When you guys get to the calibration point, there are several ways to do it based upon the equipment you have.  If you have access to a HP8640B generator or other high quality generator, you can use it to do the calibration.  Or if you have a good 5 watt power meter and a QRP transmitter, you can use them.  There are a lot of different ways to do the calibration.  We will be discussing them with you.

    Once the power meter is built and operational, you can then build the SSNA.  Before you build the SSNA, try downloading the software, compiling it and installing it on your UNO R3.  That will give your little computer a quick test.  Actually, this test can be done anytime.  After building the “shield” board (the board that plugs into the computer), decide where you want to take the output from the DDS board.  Jim, has written up some options for you.  Depending on where you extract the output, you may have to modify T1 on the shield board.  More on that later.  You will be able to test the output level of your SSNA using your power meter.  You will be able to set the calibration of the DDS by using a well calibrated Frequency meter or by listen for zero beat against WWV on a receiver. 

    If we can get everyone to follow this build sequence, we can help one another, as a group, to succeed.

Jerry W5JH

"building something without experimenting is just solder practice"

 


Re: Postal Alert - SSNA to CONUS addresses

ka9gpx
 

Hi Jim,
My Boards arrived in Illinois today...
No extra postage due for the 2-sets.
They look GREAT!!!.

Thanks for all your efforts,
Especially the "Added Bonus"
of cutting the Boards,...
and pre-drilling the ERA-3 hole.....


Carl
KA9GPX

 



---In phsna@..., <kc4gia@...> wrote:

Mine showed up yesterday.   No postage due.   Boards look great.   Now to get parts.   Drat!  The Dds modules I have aren't going to work.   Well have to track down the right ones.   That would've been too easy.

Thanks very much.   Looking forward to both the power meter and the SNA.


Continual Update to BOM Lists

Mike Hall
 

I noticed yet another revised BOM list. Are there any drastic changes since the Sep 13 the posting?
Boards (x2) arrived today...nice job! ...and no postage due.
Have to finish seeing what I have in the junk box and then send off to Mouser for remaining parts.
72/73...Mike, WB8ICN


Re: Postal Alert - SSNA to CONUS addresses

Mark Kesner
 

Mine showed up yesterday.   No postage due.   Boards look great.   Now to get parts.   Drat!  The Dds modules I have aren't going to work.   Well have to track down the right ones.   That would've been too easy.

Thanks very much.   Looking forward to both the power meter and the SNA.