Date   
Ordering Parts from Mouser

Jerry Haigwood
 

Hi All,

     Some of you know this trick but I am sure others do not so here it is.  When ordering small parts from Mouser, do it by phone and ask the sales representative to ship via 1ST class USPS mail.  That will save you a bunch of money on shipping.  You will not find that option on the web site but they will happily do that for you.  I live in Texas so I have to pay taxes on the purchase.  But, at least the shipping cost is low.

    I have not inquired about shipping via USPS for foreign orders.  So, someone from ZL, VK or G land can ask Mouser about that..

Jerry W5JH

"building something without experimenting is just solder practice"

 

Re: Postal Alert - SSNA to CONUS addresses

Doug Phillips
 

Boards arrived here in the Seattle area today no extra postage 

Thanks much Jim     Doug W7RDP



On Oct 26, 2013, at 10:26, n5ib@... wrote:

 

It seems USPS is like the IRS - it gives conflicting answers to simple questions.

Yesterday when I mailed the bulk of the USA orders (the one or two combos) I made a point to show the clerk that it was a relatively rigid envelope that probably needed the "non-machine-sortable" rate. The clerk concurred and we mailed about 40. When I mailed a late one today at a different post office I pointed out the same feature and was told it should go a the parcel rate, about a buck higher.

So who knows... I hope you guys don't get charged postage due - the worst part being having to go to the post office to pick it up. Please give me a status heads-up when the first few arrive.

The DX orders, and the CONUS for more than 2 boards went parcel anyway, so no problems expected there.

Jim, N5IB

Boards arrived

dualraoul
 

The boards are here in Nebraska, nicely done! No extra postage due.

Thanks
Ron
K0IDT

Boards arrived in WA state today

Jim Pruitt <wa7duy@...>
 

The pc boards arrive here in central Washington today in good shape.
 
Thank you.
 

J2, J3, J4 in PM BOM

Mike Hall
 

The part number for the shell of the connectors is for a capacitor (C6 and C7) and not the connector shell.

Anyone got the correct part number?

Re: J2, J3, J4 in PM BOM

N5IB
 

I fixed that part number and reposted as rev1.21

Chalk that up to MicroSoft's autocomplete "feature"


If you already have either shells or pins and are buying the other, be sure they match. The little retainer tab on the pins won't match other varieties of shells.


Jim, N5IB


---In PHSNA@..., <phsna@...> wrote:
The part number for the shell of the connectors is for a capacitor (C6 and C7) and not the connector shell.
Anyone got the correct part number?

Building the power meter

N5IB
 

One important thing to remember about the AD8307 rf detector is that it is VERY sensitive. It will measure down around -70 dBm, which is one ten-billionth of a watt! Or 71 millionths of a volt.

So you have to take extra special care to keep stray rf away from it. First and foremost is a VERY well shielded enclosure. One of those cast aluminum boxes is probably best, but the "minibox" style will be OK if the halves fit tightly together. I used an "Altoids tin on steroids" with a tight fitting slip-on lid, from PaperMart.com.

Anything coming into the box (other than the signal, of course) needs to be well bypassed for rf, hence the posts you've read recently about feedthru capacitors.
Best bet is to keep the power supply (battery) inside the box. Then the only other penetrations are for input signal and DC out to the Arduino. You can probably get away without a feedthru cap for the dc output if you use an rf type connector and bypass it very close to the box wall with a couple of caps, maybe a 0.001 uF in parallel with a 0.1 uF There is another bypass cap on the PC board, but don't rely on that one.

If you use an analog meter with yours, the meter represents a big hole in the box (unless its one of those great mil surplus full-metal-jacket types). For a plastic meter, maybe some copper foil tape or real aluminum foil duct tape can be applied to the back to cover most of the gaps.

Jim, N5IB

Re: J2, J3, J4 in PM BOM

Mike Hall
 

Thanks Jim!



---In phsna@..., <n5ib@...> wrote:

I fixed that part number and reposted as rev1.21

Chalk that up to MicroSoft's autocomplete "feature"


If you already have either shells or pins and are buying the other, be sure they match. The little retainer tab on the pins won't match other varieties of shells.


Jim, N5IB


---In PHSNA@..., <phsna@...> wrote:
The part number for the shell of the connectors is for a capacitor (C6 and C7) and not the connector shell.
Anyone got the correct part number?

Bill of Materials for both versions of SSNA

Mike Hall
 

Jim, are you updating the bill of materials for both versions of the SSNA? Don't see it in the files list now.

Re: Bill of Materials for both versions of SSNA

N5IB
 

I had the BOM down for a bit just to update the date and a version number so folks can keep straight what they are working from. rev5.01 is dated 31 October.  It's back up now.


No changes were made in the parts info itself, just date and version.


Jim, N5IB

AD8307 socket

 

Is it ok to put the AD8307 in a socket or better to solder it in?

tnx
John
K3YJP

Re: AD8307 socket

N5IB
 

 



---In PHSNA@..., <phsna@...> wrote:
Is it ok to put the AD8307 in a socket or better to solder it in?

I'd recommend no socket. Keep everything short and sweet in the rf front end.

But that being said, the prototype I did on the homemade PCB did use a socket and did not seem to suffer. It is an expensive chip compared to many we use (unless you scored a free sample from AD) so I understand the temptation to socket it. Go ahead and socket the op amp, since everything around it is nearly dc.

The SMT version has been rumoured to perform better, and that may be partly because of the nice short lead arrangement.

Jim, N5IB

LM317L pinout?

Nick Kennedy
 

The board is laid out for the LM317L pinout as being IN-ADJ-OUT from L to R.  The data sheet I'm using shows it is ADJ-OUT-IN.  Is there more than one pinout available for this regulator?  Or am I just looking at it wrong?  Wouldn't be the first time.


73/TU,

Nick, WA5BDU

Parts and Request

Jay Henson
 

Fellow builders,

P2, P3 & P4 on the power meter board are two pin
male headers with no polarizing tabs. I am
planning to get a female header Mouser
#517-850-01-19 (19 female positions). With a
Dremel tool or good knife, I can cut 2 pins away
from the header and create J3, likewise J4. One
pin is sacrificed in the process, but there are a
lot of female pins left to work with. There is
very little cost difference between the female
header and the shells and pins. YMMV!

I have a request for Jim and/or Jerry, and anyone
that has finished their power meter and/or the
SNA. Post pictures of the final results,
particularly the power meter insides.

Vy 73 to all,
Jay
AJ4AY
Mobile, AL

BUILDER ALERT!! - SSNA - LM317L - ALERT !!

N5IB
 

Nick found a layout error.
Jerry caught my original mistake back on the prototype.
I fixed it, and then it snuck back in, dagnabbit.
This applies to both the 5109 and the ERA versions of the SSNA
*****************
You will need to criss-cross the ADJ and OUT leads of the LM317L.
*****************
With the flat of the package facing as drawn on the silk screen, the lead closest to U1 IS CORRECT.
The middle lead and the lead closest to the AREF pin need to be crossed.

When I get back home in a couple of days I'll take a photo and post it. If any of you want to post a photo right away, go ahead.

Jim, N5IB

Re: AD8307 socket

Ted KX4OM
 

I not only used a DIP socket for the AS8307 in my build some years back, I soldered the socket to a homemade "Manhattan" board which I glued to the main board of the AD8307. I enclosed that whole part of the circuit in a shielded copper clad homebrew box with feedthru caps for power. That way, I didn't have to worry about a completely shielded unit for the log power meter. I don't use it (so far) above 30MHz, and it seems to be fine. As Jim says, soldering the chip directly to the board is better practice.

You can see my build of the original meter on my site at www.kx4om.com.

73, Ted KX4OM

--- In PHSNA@..., <dtjay@...> wrote:

Is it ok to put the AD8307 in a socket or better to solder it in?

tnx
John
K3YJP

Re: Question on the power meter board ...

Ted KX4OM
 

The local Ace Hardware stores here in Georgia have brass and tin stock. I prefer to use tin as it is easier to bend and solder. I've made a few shielded compartments in rigs using PCB stock for the walls and floor, and then soldering on a "tin roof" with edges that overlap the walls. I did that for the VFO compartment of a 40m receiver based on Dave Benson's SW-40+ transceiver. It was easy to make adjustments by unsoldering three edges and bending the tin up 90 degrees.This link shows that VFO with the tin and PCB combination.

http://www.kx4om.com/Projects/40m%20Superhet/40m_superhet.html

73,
Ted, KX4OM

--- In PHSNA@..., <n5ib@...> wrote:

Yes, That was the intent. To allow you do do at least some shielding around the front end components. I have one in the works at the home QTH and will post photos when I'm done, but that will be at least a week.

I had built a prototype (homemade PCB) without shielding and it workes fine, but I thought... maybe more is better :^))



I have some 1/32" PCB stock I was going to try, if that was unmanageable then brass shim stock could be bent into sort of a quonset hut affair top and bottom.



Jim, N5IB

DIP socket etc.

Ted KX4OM
 

Okay, ignore those links to my web site. I added some pertinent photos to the Photos section of the group showing the construction technique of my original meter (plus I changed my account for the group to show my call.)

73,
Ted, KX4OM

Re: Parts and Request

Jerry Haigwood
 

Hi Jay,

     You guys are blazing the trail here.  My power meter was built ugly/manhattan style.  I am not sure how Jim built his.  So, my pictures probably won’t help very much.  I would recommend soldering the 8307 IC directly to the PCB.  If built right, this power meter should be useful up to 500 MHz.  You should be using UHF building techniques.  That means short leads and no sockets on the 8307.

Jerry W5JH

"building something without experimenting is just solder practice"

 

From: PHSNA@... [mailto:PHSNA@...] On Behalf Of Jay
Sent: Thursday, October 31, 2013 3:21 PM
To: PHSNA@...
Subject: [PHSNA] Parts and Request

 

 

Fellow builders,

P2, P3 & P4 on the power meter board are two pin
male headers with no polarizing tabs. I am
planning to get a female header Mouser
#517-850-01-19 (19 female positions). With a
Dremel tool or good knife, I can cut 2 pins away
from the header and create J3, likewise J4. One
pin is sacrificed in the process, but there are a
lot of female pins left to work with. There is
very little cost difference between the female
header and the shells and pins. YMMV!

I have a request for Jim and/or Jerry, and anyone
that has finished their power meter and/or the
SNA. Post pictures of the final results,
particularly the power meter insides.

Vy 73 to all,
Jay
AJ4AY
Mobile, AL

BUILDER ALERT!! - SSNA - D1 - ALERT

N5IB
 

Y'all thank Nick... he found another one... this one's mysterious. The anode end of D1 is clearly connected to the ground plane on the top side. On the bottom side the layout doesn't show a ground plane connection, but the margin around the pad is reduced. Both conditions are in error. The layout file ended up showing BOTH a clearance margin and a filled plane connection. Don't know how that could happen.

Here's the fix...
Connect and solder the left (non-banded) lead of  D1 and the right lead of F1 together as "flying leads", but DO NOT solder them  to the PC pads.  Leave them elevated above the board. If you choose to not use F1 at all, you can just connect D1 from its normal banded-end pad to the left pad of F1, skipping the two middle pads entirely.

Once again, when I get home I'll post a photo.

Jim, N5IB