Date   
Re: The Funduino

caulktel@...
 

Hi  Steve WB6TN,


I also picked up a Nano and Pro Mini knock off from China and I'm waiting for the serial programmer module to get here any day. Where did you get the adapter to plug the program module directly into the Deek Robot module? I don't have anything like that but can easily make one, however the one you have would be easier. I already built a prototype DDS VFO out of a Arduino UNO and now want to shrink it down to size and get my UNO back for other projects. I'm also following the PHSNA project closely as well. Nice to hear from you again.


Joel

KB6QVI



---In phsna@..., <sigcom@...> wrote:

I have posted photos in the Photos section, WB6TNL.  Included is:  "aruduino pro mini clone - atmega328p" (deek-robot miniature UNO clone kit), deek-robot and UNO R3 clone together for size comparo, and deek-robot with FTDI serial to USB board.

 

73.......Steve Smith WB6TNL

 

 



---In phsna@..., <sigcom@...> wrote:

FWIW, I bought an UNO R3 'clone' from an eBay vendor in NY. Cost $12.50, shipped, and took about 3 days to arrive in SoCal. It came with a USB cable and fired right up. I noticed just now that his price has gone up to $13.50 but he does have another sale for $12.25 without the cable.

It ;s, however, pretty well blatantly a counterfeit. Marked "AREDUINO" and "UNO" on the component side with the correct font and the same "DESIGN IN ITALY" on the bottom side. A darned well built counterfeit but nonetheless, fake.

I was going to buy the R3 from a vendor in SoCal but he sold out before I got off my butt. But what he did/does have is something called a "Arduino Pro Mini Clone" which is not really an Arduino, per se, but does function like one. It's about 1/3 the size of an UNO R3 with the same functionality (except for the programming interface0. It has an ATMega328 with the Arduino boot loader 'burned' in. The programming interface is serial so if one only has USB, either a USB to serial adaptor ($6 from Hong Kong) is required. I suppose a UNO R3 could be lashed up to do the conversion for programming. All the usual I/O is brought out to solder pads around the edges of the board and three inline pin strips are included. It does not proclaim to be an Arduino and the only indentification is "deek-robot" on the underside of the board.

Anyway, I thought this would be an inexpensive method to control projects like the PHSNA.

I'll upload a pic. to the Group Photos section later this evening.

73.......Steve Smith WB6TNL





From: <n5ib@...>
To: <PHSNA@...>
Subject: [PHSNA] RE: Re: The Funduino
Date: 03 Oct 2013 14:00:43 -0700My Funduino UNO R3 arrived today from "Chipworld". It was marked "Funduino" and "Design in Italy" and WWW.FUNDUINO.CN" Cost was $14.30 including shipping. Ordered on 19 Sept, so took 14 days.

It was supposed to come with a short USB cable, but that was missing. There was a tear in the shipping envelope, which may explain the missing cable. All the other parts in the order were OK.
Quality appears quite good. Plugged it into an ASUS laptop running Win7-64. Found the driver seamlessly as COM5 (my Arduino apparently has dibs on COM4) and accepted the SSNA software. Runs fine.

Looks like these clones are the way to keep the SSNA under the $50 target.

Jim, N5IB

Re: The Funduino

sigcom1
 

Hi Joel,

I assume by adaptor you mean the inline connector for the serial port on the Deek-Robot board. It came with each board; a 6-pin, right angle header which conviently solders right onto the end of the Deek board. I posted a picture of the Deek kit in the Group Photos section but it isn't very clear that the 6-pin header is righ-angle.

My reason for purchasing the Deek boards is basically the same as yours. For 6 bucks or so I can dedicate the Deek board controller to a project without tying up an UNO. Sketch development can be done on the UNO then transferred to the Deek board.

Best of luck with your projects and

73.......Steve Smith WB6TNL

From: <@caulktel>
To: <PHSNA@...>
Subject: [PHSNA] RE: The Funduino
Date: 07 Oct 2013 18:46:03 -0700

I also picked up a Nano and Pro Mini knock off from China and I'm waiting for the serial programmer module to get here any day. Where did you get the adapter to plug the program module directly into the Deek Robot module? I don't have anything like that but can easily make one, however the one you have would be easier. I already built a prototype DDS VFO out of a Arduino UNO and now want to shrink it down to size and get my UNO back for other projects. I'm also following the PHSNA project closely as well. Nice to hear from you again.

Re: The Funduino

sigcom1
 

Hi Joel,

Here are the auction numbers where I bought the boards and stuff:

161109783605 : Deek board
230820610037 : FTDI USB to serial board
251314107951 : UNO R3 clone

73.......Steve Smith WB6TNL

Uploaded a plot of a filter I built last night

Jerry Haigwood
 

Hi Folks,

    I uploaded a plot of a 6 element Cohn filter I built last night.  This is a 3.276275 MHz filter for a project I am working on.  I really like the shape of the filter.  I say it is a 6 element Cohn filter but it is actually two 3 element filters connected back to back.  If you are interested in viewing it, the plot is in the files section labeled 3276275 Filter.pdf.

Jerry W5JH

"building something without experimenting is just solder practice"

 

Re: Update on PCB orders

Jay Henson
 

Jim,

 

With aging eye sight and shaky hands, please update my request from the 1 set of boards to 2 sets of boards.  No telling what I can do to a board with a soldering iron.

 

Thanks for the neat project and your efforts.

 

Jay Henson

AJ4AY

Mobile, AL 

Re: Data Patch Leads??

Garey Barrell
 

Where do you find the 'patch leads' like shown on the NR8O 9850 test set.

These are the ones that mate with the 0.1" spaced plug strips.

They look to be commercial, but I can't find them....

73, Garey - K4OAH
Glen Allen, VA

Re: Data Patch Leads??

Graham <planophore@...>
 

Good day all,

The breadboard jumpers in the link provided by Jim work very well.

Another alternative are jumper wires made up using the male version of the Dupont connector type.  I don't know why they are called Dupont connectors unless it has something to do with Dupont being the original maker of such connectors. However, these connectors are very common and have 0.1" pin spacing and are single and double row. Once you see a picture you will recognize them.

There are male Dupont pins which plug into compatible sockets and you can get pre-made jumpers on eBay. These have rather than the round pins of the type provided in the link by Jim, a square or nearly so pin and are a better more solid fit.

They can be purchased with or without the plastic shell.

If you search on Amazon for male dupont connector you will find them there as well.  The type pointed out in the link provided by Jim are also very common on eBay and are easily found by searching for "arduino jumper" or "breadboard jumper".

Now, you can get the ones having the single plastic shell on the end or as I have done, starting with the ones without the plastic shell, put a short piece of heat shrink on the end leaving only the pin exposed. The plastic shells are easily removed if have those with the shell and wanted to try the heat shrink trick.

I have and have used both types and find the Dupont one's superior.


here are a couple of links for the Dupont items on eBay: (watch the line wrap)









cheers, Graham ve3gtc



On 13-10-13 10:27 PM, n5ib@... wrote:
 

Hi Gary,

Try

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Assorted-Multicolored-Flexible-Solderless-Breadbo
ard/dp/B0087ZRVES

Jim, N5IB

On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 17:33:12 -0400 Garey Barrell
writes:
> Where do you find the 'patch leads' like shown on the NR8O 9850 test
> set.
>
> These are the ones that mate with the 0.1" spaced plug strips.
>
> They look to be commercial, but I can't find them....



Source for ICs

Michael McShan <n5jky@...>
 

There are some really ham-friendly companies out there…

If you go to Mini-Circuits website, you can register and received free samples of the ERA-3 chip (they automatically give you 4). Here is their address:

http://www.minicircuits.com/homepage/homepage.html

Just follow the registration instructions. They will ask for your application when you ask for the "EZ Samples." Just tell them the truth, don't try to make them think you're a defense contractor. :-)

73,
Mike N5JKY
Oklahoma City, OK

Source for ICs follow-up

Michael McShan <n5jky@...>
 

I also remembered that I got free sample of the AD8307 chips from Analog Devices…

http://www.analog.com

73,
Mike N5JKY
Oklahoma City, OK

Source for ICs

Michael McShan <n5jky@...>
 

Hmm… somehow this didn't seem to go through the first time.

There are some really ham-friendly companies out there…

If you go to Mini-Circuits website, you can register and received free samples of the ERA-3 chip (they automatically give you 4). Here is their address:

http://www.minicircuits.com/homepage/homepage.html

Just follow the registration instructions. They will ask for your application when you ask for the "EZ Samples." Just tell them the truth, don't try to make them think you're a defense contractor. :-)

73,
Mike N5JKY
Oklahoma City, OK

Mouser/Digikey Parts List for Power Meter?

patt896
 

Anyone compiled one yet?

 

Richard

Re: Mouser/Digikey Parts List for Power Meter?

N5IB
 

I've updated the Bill of Materials for the power meter to include Mouser catalog numbers. Not always the least expensive, but at least readily obtainable in US.

Remember that other op amps can be substituted for the AD820, as long as they operate from a single supply and have outputs that swing to near ground. FET input preferred. Remember also that Analog Devices still does offer samples of the AD8307.

No enclosure listed yet, Mostly depends on whether you include an analog meter, and then how big the meter movement is. The analog meter is not needed for the SSNA, but very convenient for general use. The actual circuit board is roughly 3 cm x 10 cm.

Jim, N5IB


Re: Mouser/Digikey Parts List for Power Meter?

gene@...
 

Here's an inexpensive meter.  http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G19419

I have one and found that the cover snaps off easily and the scale comes right off allowing for an easy way to apply a custom scale.

Gene, W5DOR

 



---In phsna@..., <n5ib@...> wrote:

I've updated the Bill of Materials for the power meter to include Mouser catalog numbers. Not always the least expensive, but at least readily obtainable in US.

Remember that other op amps can be substituted for the AD820, as long as they operate from a single supply and have outputs that swing to near ground. FET input preferred. Remember also that Analog Devices still does offer samples of the AD8307.

No enclosure listed yet, Mostly depends on whether you include an analog meter, and then how big the meter movement is. The analog meter is not needed for the SSNA, but very convenient for general use. The actual circuit board is roughly 3 cm x 10 cm.

Jim, N5IB


Re: Mouser/Digikey Parts List for Power Meter?

Jerry Haigwood
 

Hi Folks,

    I used a meter from Allelectronics for my power meter.  It is a small square meter, 0-1 mA movement, 0-15 VDC scale.  This meter matched the specs of the meter that Wes Hayward used when he and W7PUA designed the power meter. The little square meter sells for $3.50.  Here is a link for it.

<http://www.allelectronics.com/make-a-store/item/PM-376/PANEL-METER-FULL-SCALE-1MA/1.html>

Jerry W5JH

"building something without experimenting is just solder practice"

 

From: PHSNA@... [mailto:PHSNA@...] On Behalf Of gene@...
Sent: Friday, October 18, 2013 12:50 PM
To: PHSNA@...
Subject: [PHSNA] RE: Mouser/Digikey Parts List for Power Meter?

 

 

Here's an inexpensive meter.  http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G19419

I have one and found that the cover snaps off easily and the scale comes right off allowing for an easy way to apply a custom scale.

Gene, W5DOR

 



---In phsna@..., <n5ib@...> wrote:

I've updated the Bill of Materials for the power meter to include Mouser catalog numbers. Not always the least expensive, but at least readily obtainable in US.

Remember that other op amps can be substituted for the AD820, as long as they operate from a single supply and have outputs that swing to near ground. FET input preferred. Remember also that Analog Devices still does offer samples of the AD8307.

No enclosure listed yet, Mostly depends on whether you include an analog meter, and then how big the meter movement is. The analog meter is not needed for the SSNA, but very convenient for general use. The actual circuit board is roughly 3 cm x 10 cm.

Jim, N5IB

Unfiltered AD9850 Output

N5IB
 

As others have commented, there is no need for both the LPF on the 9850 module and the one on the SSNA. Jerry has found that the one on the 9850 module seems of particularly low quality, given the use of SMT inductors. The LPF Jerry designed for the SSNA should be much better.

I've uploaded a file "Unfiltered AD9850 Output" that has some information about modifying the 9850 module. There are two options, depending on how good you are at SMT rework. Extra pads are provided on the SSNA board to assist with this.

I have NOT yet done either of these. But plan to do the "elegant" one when the SSNA boards arrive, since I have access to a rework station, and a spare 9850 module I can afford to botch up in the attempt  :^))

73
Jim, N5IB

Re: SSNA/Power Meter PCB order status

N5IB
 

I have received notice the the boards are being shipped (DHL)
Not yet in the hands of DHL, though they have received the shipping info, so I don't have a delivery date, but might be by the end of the week.

If you haven't yet paid for you order (6 are pending), not a bad time to do so.
PayPal  to   jerry (at) w5jh (dot) net

73,
Jim, N5IB

Re: Unfiltered AD9850 Output

Nick Kennedy
 

Yeah, I was kind of figuring we were going to bypass the filter on the DDS board rather than cascade the two.  Looks like it's designed for 200 ohms input & output also.


73-


Nick, WA5BDU

Output level and crystal drive

Nick Kennedy
 

I've been looking at the circuit and thinking of stuff I might want to try.  One is that I think I want to get some more juice out of the DDS + amplifier.  The circuit has a lot of attenuation to hit the desired -10 dBm level.  I'd like to go with maybe +10 dBm or so and attenuate externally when I need to.

Which got me to thinking about how much drive is too much when testing a crystal. Funny, I did a presentation on crystal measurements at 4SQRP but didn't even get into this sub-topic.  For one thing, there are a lot of variables.  I looked at some references including an excellent PDF paper by Corning / John R. Vig which showed typical dissipation values of 10 uW and 100 uW and typical drive currents of 100 uA to 1 mA.  (I see drive expressed in units of current and of power, at different times.)
The ECS data sheet for a typical HC49/U 8MHz crystal I used in a filter gave a maximum drive number of 1 mW, but no "typical".  So I'd think you'd actually want a lot less -- say 10% to 20% of that as a maximum.
Factors include your crystal's series resistance Rs and the loss in your measurement fixture, if any.  A pair of resistive minimum loss pads 50 to 12.5 ohms back to back with the crystal in between is sometimes used. It has 16 dB loss in each section.  I used LTSpice to check some dissipations and currents in this configuration with various Rs values.  I used a source with 50 ohms internal resistance and voltage set to give 1 mW (0 dBm) to an external 50 ohm load.
Here are the numbers I got with Rs of 10, 20 and 50 ohms:
10 ohms, Ix = 1mA, Px = 10.2 uW
20 ohms, Ix = 786 uA, Px = 12.4 uW
50 ohms, Ix = 471 uA, Px = 11.1 uW
So with that configuration, you should be able to drive with +10 dBm and not over-do it. (Your dissipations would be a bit over 100 uW.)
I also use a fixture that also puts the crystal in a 12.5 ohm environment but uses back to back 4:1 transformers.  Here you don't have resistive losses, plus the configuration gives twice as much current through the crystal as comes out of the generator.  With a 0 dBm source, your crystal might get close to the 1 mW limit and dropping down 10 dB or more might be a good idea.
73-
Nick, WA5BDU



Re: Output level and crystal drive

Jerry Haigwood
 

Hi Nick,

    I chose -10 dbm as the output to prevent damaging crystals.  I think -10 dbm is good maximum based on some emails I had with Kerry Powers (can’t remember his call).  However, the extra attenuation was put in so that people could decide how much power they wanted.  You can get up to +20 db more out of the SSNA.  Of course if you decide to increase the power out of the SSNA, you will have to change the amount of voltage you get out of the power meter.  A value of +5 VDC is the absolute maximum you can feed back into the SSNA.

Jerry W5JH

"building something without experimenting is just solder practice"

 

From: PHSNA@... [mailto:PHSNA@...] On Behalf Of kennnick@...
Sent: Monday, October 21, 2013 7:40 PM
To: PHSNA@...
Subject: [PHSNA] Output level and crystal drive

 

 

I've been looking at the circuit and thinking of stuff I might want to try.  One is that I think I want to get some more juice out of the DDS + amplifier.  The circuit has a lot of attenuation to hit the desired -10 dBm level.  I'd like to go with maybe +10 dBm or so and attenuate externally when I need to.

Which got me to thinking about how much drive is too much when testing a crystal. Funny, I did a presentation on crystal measurements at 4SQRP but didn't even get into this sub-topic.  For one thing, there are a lot of variables.  I looked at some references including an excellent PDF paper by Corning / John R. Vig which showed typical dissipation values of 10 uW and 100 uW and typical drive currents of 100 uA to 1 mA.  (I see drive expressed in units of current and of power, at different times.)

The ECS data sheet for a typical HC49/U 8MHz crystal I used in a filter gave a maximum drive number of 1 mW, but no "typical".  So I'd think you'd actually want a lot less -- say 10% to 20% of that as a maximum.

Factors include your crystal's series resistance Rs and the loss in your measurement fixture, if any.  A pair of resistive minimum loss pads 50 to 12.5 ohms back to back with the crystal in between is sometimes used. It has 16 dB loss in each section.  I used LTSpice to check some dissipations and currents in this configuration with various Rs values.  I used a source with 50 ohms internal resistance and voltage set to give 1 mW (0 dBm) to an external 50 ohm load.

Here are the numbers I got with Rs of 10, 20 and 50 ohms:

10 ohms, Ix = 1mA, Px = 10.2 uW

20 ohms, Ix = 786 uA, Px = 12.4 uW

50 ohms, Ix = 471 uA, Px = 11.1 uW

So with that configuration, you should be able to drive with +10 dBm and not over-do it. (Your dissipations would be a bit over 100 uW.)

I also use a fixture that also puts the crystal in a 12.5 ohm environment but uses back to back 4:1 transformers.  Here you don't have resistive losses, plus the configuration gives twice as much current through the crystal as comes out of the generator.  With a 0 dBm source, your crystal might get close to the 1 mW limit and dropping down 10 dB or more might be a good idea.

73-

Nick, WA5BDU

 

 

 

New BOM file for SSNA

Jay Henson
 

Jim,

 

Short of comparing line by line, what are the changes in the new SSNA BOM file?

 

Jay

AJ4AY

Mobile, AL