Date   

Source for ICs

Michael McShan <n5jky@...>
 

Hmm… somehow this didn't seem to go through the first time.

There are some really ham-friendly companies out there…

If you go to Mini-Circuits website, you can register and received free samples of the ERA-3 chip (they automatically give you 4). Here is their address:

http://www.minicircuits.com/homepage/homepage.html

Just follow the registration instructions. They will ask for your application when you ask for the "EZ Samples." Just tell them the truth, don't try to make them think you're a defense contractor. :-)

73,
Mike N5JKY
Oklahoma City, OK


Source for ICs follow-up

Michael McShan <n5jky@...>
 

I also remembered that I got free sample of the AD8307 chips from Analog Devices…

http://www.analog.com

73,
Mike N5JKY
Oklahoma City, OK


Source for ICs

Michael McShan <n5jky@...>
 

There are some really ham-friendly companies out there…

If you go to Mini-Circuits website, you can register and received free samples of the ERA-3 chip (they automatically give you 4). Here is their address:

http://www.minicircuits.com/homepage/homepage.html

Just follow the registration instructions. They will ask for your application when you ask for the "EZ Samples." Just tell them the truth, don't try to make them think you're a defense contractor. :-)

73,
Mike N5JKY
Oklahoma City, OK


Re: Data Patch Leads??

Graham <planophore@...>
 

Good day all,

The breadboard jumpers in the link provided by Jim work very well.

Another alternative are jumper wires made up using the male version of the Dupont connector type.  I don't know why they are called Dupont connectors unless it has something to do with Dupont being the original maker of such connectors. However, these connectors are very common and have 0.1" pin spacing and are single and double row. Once you see a picture you will recognize them.

There are male Dupont pins which plug into compatible sockets and you can get pre-made jumpers on eBay. These have rather than the round pins of the type provided in the link by Jim, a square or nearly so pin and are a better more solid fit.

They can be purchased with or without the plastic shell.

If you search on Amazon for male dupont connector you will find them there as well.  The type pointed out in the link provided by Jim are also very common on eBay and are easily found by searching for "arduino jumper" or "breadboard jumper".

Now, you can get the ones having the single plastic shell on the end or as I have done, starting with the ones without the plastic shell, put a short piece of heat shrink on the end leaving only the pin exposed. The plastic shells are easily removed if have those with the shell and wanted to try the heat shrink trick.

I have and have used both types and find the Dupont one's superior.


here are a couple of links for the Dupont items on eBay: (watch the line wrap)









cheers, Graham ve3gtc



On 13-10-13 10:27 PM, n5ib@... wrote:
 

Hi Gary,

Try

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Assorted-Multicolored-Flexible-Solderless-Breadbo
ard/dp/B0087ZRVES

Jim, N5IB

On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 17:33:12 -0400 Garey Barrell
writes:
> Where do you find the 'patch leads' like shown on the NR8O 9850 test
> set.
>
> These are the ones that mate with the 0.1" spaced plug strips.
>
> They look to be commercial, but I can't find them....




Re: Data Patch Leads??

Garey Barrell
 

Where do you find the 'patch leads' like shown on the NR8O 9850 test set.

These are the ones that mate with the 0.1" spaced plug strips.

They look to be commercial, but I can't find them....

73, Garey - K4OAH
Glen Allen, VA


Re: Update on PCB orders

Jay Henson
 

Jim,

 

With aging eye sight and shaky hands, please update my request from the 1 set of boards to 2 sets of boards.  No telling what I can do to a board with a soldering iron.

 

Thanks for the neat project and your efforts.

 

Jay Henson

AJ4AY

Mobile, AL 


Uploaded a plot of a filter I built last night

Jerry Haigwood
 

Hi Folks,

    I uploaded a plot of a 6 element Cohn filter I built last night.  This is a 3.276275 MHz filter for a project I am working on.  I really like the shape of the filter.  I say it is a 6 element Cohn filter but it is actually two 3 element filters connected back to back.  If you are interested in viewing it, the plot is in the files section labeled 3276275 Filter.pdf.

Jerry W5JH

"building something without experimenting is just solder practice"

 


Re: The Funduino

sigcom1
 

Hi Joel,

Here are the auction numbers where I bought the boards and stuff:

161109783605 : Deek board
230820610037 : FTDI USB to serial board
251314107951 : UNO R3 clone

73.......Steve Smith WB6TNL


Re: The Funduino

sigcom1
 

Hi Joel,

I assume by adaptor you mean the inline connector for the serial port on the Deek-Robot board. It came with each board; a 6-pin, right angle header which conviently solders right onto the end of the Deek board. I posted a picture of the Deek kit in the Group Photos section but it isn't very clear that the 6-pin header is righ-angle.

My reason for purchasing the Deek boards is basically the same as yours. For 6 bucks or so I can dedicate the Deek board controller to a project without tying up an UNO. Sketch development can be done on the UNO then transferred to the Deek board.

Best of luck with your projects and

73.......Steve Smith WB6TNL

From: <@caulktel>
To: <PHSNA@...>
Subject: [PHSNA] RE: The Funduino
Date: 07 Oct 2013 18:46:03 -0700

I also picked up a Nano and Pro Mini knock off from China and I'm waiting for the serial programmer module to get here any day. Where did you get the adapter to plug the program module directly into the Deek Robot module? I don't have anything like that but can easily make one, however the one you have would be easier. I already built a prototype DDS VFO out of a Arduino UNO and now want to shrink it down to size and get my UNO back for other projects. I'm also following the PHSNA project closely as well. Nice to hear from you again.


Re: The Funduino

caulktel@...
 

Hi  Steve WB6TN,


I also picked up a Nano and Pro Mini knock off from China and I'm waiting for the serial programmer module to get here any day. Where did you get the adapter to plug the program module directly into the Deek Robot module? I don't have anything like that but can easily make one, however the one you have would be easier. I already built a prototype DDS VFO out of a Arduino UNO and now want to shrink it down to size and get my UNO back for other projects. I'm also following the PHSNA project closely as well. Nice to hear from you again.


Joel

KB6QVI



---In phsna@..., <sigcom@...> wrote:

I have posted photos in the Photos section, WB6TNL.  Included is:  "aruduino pro mini clone - atmega328p" (deek-robot miniature UNO clone kit), deek-robot and UNO R3 clone together for size comparo, and deek-robot with FTDI serial to USB board.

 

73.......Steve Smith WB6TNL

 

 



---In phsna@..., <sigcom@...> wrote:

FWIW, I bought an UNO R3 'clone' from an eBay vendor in NY. Cost $12.50, shipped, and took about 3 days to arrive in SoCal. It came with a USB cable and fired right up. I noticed just now that his price has gone up to $13.50 but he does have another sale for $12.25 without the cable.

It ;s, however, pretty well blatantly a counterfeit. Marked "AREDUINO" and "UNO" on the component side with the correct font and the same "DESIGN IN ITALY" on the bottom side. A darned well built counterfeit but nonetheless, fake.

I was going to buy the R3 from a vendor in SoCal but he sold out before I got off my butt. But what he did/does have is something called a "Arduino Pro Mini Clone" which is not really an Arduino, per se, but does function like one. It's about 1/3 the size of an UNO R3 with the same functionality (except for the programming interface0. It has an ATMega328 with the Arduino boot loader 'burned' in. The programming interface is serial so if one only has USB, either a USB to serial adaptor ($6 from Hong Kong) is required. I suppose a UNO R3 could be lashed up to do the conversion for programming. All the usual I/O is brought out to solder pads around the edges of the board and three inline pin strips are included. It does not proclaim to be an Arduino and the only indentification is "deek-robot" on the underside of the board.

Anyway, I thought this would be an inexpensive method to control projects like the PHSNA.

I'll upload a pic. to the Group Photos section later this evening.

73.......Steve Smith WB6TNL





From: <n5ib@...>
To: <PHSNA@...>
Subject: [PHSNA] RE: Re: The Funduino
Date: 03 Oct 2013 14:00:43 -0700My Funduino UNO R3 arrived today from "Chipworld". It was marked "Funduino" and "Design in Italy" and WWW.FUNDUINO.CN" Cost was $14.30 including shipping. Ordered on 19 Sept, so took 14 days.

It was supposed to come with a short USB cable, but that was missing. There was a tear in the shipping envelope, which may explain the missing cable. All the other parts in the order were OK.
Quality appears quite good. Plugged it into an ASUS laptop running Win7-64. Found the driver seamlessly as COM5 (my Arduino apparently has dibs on COM4) and accepted the SSNA software. Runs fine.

Looks like these clones are the way to keep the SSNA under the $50 target.

Jim, N5IB


Re: The Funduino

sigcom1
 

I have posted photos in the Photos section, WB6TNL.  Included is:  "aruduino pro mini clone - atmega328p" (deek-robot miniature UNO clone kit), deek-robot and UNO R3 clone together for size comparo, and deek-robot with FTDI serial to USB board.

 

73.......Steve Smith WB6TNL

 

 



---In phsna@..., <sigcom@...> wrote:

FWIW, I bought an UNO R3 'clone' from an eBay vendor in NY. Cost $12.50, shipped, and took about 3 days to arrive in SoCal. It came with a USB cable and fired right up. I noticed just now that his price has gone up to $13.50 but he does have another sale for $12.25 without the cable.

It ;s, however, pretty well blatantly a counterfeit. Marked "AREDUINO" and "UNO" on the component side with the correct font and the same "DESIGN IN ITALY" on the bottom side. A darned well built counterfeit but nonetheless, fake.

I was going to buy the R3 from a vendor in SoCal but he sold out before I got off my butt. But what he did/does have is something called a "Arduino Pro Mini Clone" which is not really an Arduino, per se, but does function like one. It's about 1/3 the size of an UNO R3 with the same functionality (except for the programming interface0. It has an ATMega328 with the Arduino boot loader 'burned' in. The programming interface is serial so if one only has USB, either a USB to serial adaptor ($6 from Hong Kong) is required. I suppose a UNO R3 could be lashed up to do the conversion for programming. All the usual I/O is brought out to solder pads around the edges of the board and three inline pin strips are included. It does not proclaim to be an Arduino and the only indentification is "deek-robot" on the underside of the board.

Anyway, I thought this would be an inexpensive method to control projects like the PHSNA.

I'll upload a pic. to the Group Photos section later this evening.

73.......Steve Smith WB6TNL





From: <n5ib@...>
To: <PHSNA@...>
Subject: [PHSNA] RE: Re: The Funduino
Date: 03 Oct 2013 14:00:43 -0700My Funduino UNO R3 arrived today from "Chipworld". It was marked "Funduino" and "Design in Italy" and WWW.FUNDUINO.CN" Cost was $14.30 including shipping. Ordered on 19 Sept, so took 14 days.

It was supposed to come with a short USB cable, but that was missing. There was a tear in the shipping envelope, which may explain the missing cable. All the other parts in the order were OK.
Quality appears quite good. Plugged it into an ASUS laptop running Win7-64. Found the driver seamlessly as COM5 (my Arduino apparently has dibs on COM4) and accepted the SSNA software. Runs fine.

Looks like these clones are the way to keep the SSNA under the $50 target.

Jim, N5IB


Re: Measuring high impedance filters

Nick Kennedy
 

Well, I usually think a transformer should have 5 to 10 times the load resistance in the reactance of its magnetizing inductance, which is just to say the inductance of the winding connected to the load.  That's hard to get if you need 10,000 to 20,000 ohms at 3.395 MHz, even with high permeability ferrites.  You could use something with a lot less inductance, maybe iron powder, and then parallel resonant the winding, but now you're fusing with tuning.

But scratching around a bit I found that I have a few ferrite toroids with an AL value of 1100 to 1200, so I'd only need 20 turns to get the 10,000 ohms minimum I think I need. I wound a couple with 3 turns on the 50 ohms side and tried again, without the amplifier.  Now my floor is at about -50 dBm - not great but a big improvement for sure.  The filter shape looked about the same.  Still 1200 Hz at -3dB points for a filter specified as 2100 Hz.  Maybe it's just not a very good filter.

I have this other filter of unknown termination requirements that came with a nice plot.  It's 2.1 kHz at 10.7 MHz and the plot shows it nice and flat on top with steep sides.  I thought I'd try it in a 50 ohm environment and see how it looks.  The main thing was a large amount of ripple in the passband - at least 3 dB.  It had a little shelf or shoulder as it sloped off on the low side.  And the loss inside the passband was about 19 dB.  I wonder if there's some way from these observations to deduce the required terminating R, or if it's all trial and error.

Regarding using a L-match for 2000 to 50 ohms -- I've done it for an 80 meter EFHW. Don't know how efficient it is, but it seems to do OK.  

I also thought about some kind of active matching for the 2000 ohm filter.  Maybe simple JFET buffer stages with 50 in / 2000 out and 2000 in and 50 out impedances.  But that was going to be more effort than I wanted to exert just for playing around with junkbox filters.  

73-

Nick, WA5BDU



Re: Measuring high impedance filters

Jerry Haigwood
 

Hi Jim and Nick,

    It has been my experience that an L network works a lot better than a transformer.  However, I have never tried to build one for 50:2000 ohms.  The transformers introduce more loss than an L network.  I typically use ZMAT a software program which comes with the book, “Experimental Methods in RF Design” to design the network.  I then wind the toroid and use a combination of a fixed and a variable cap.  I temporarily mount the L network on a piece of copper clad and use a resistor as a temporary load.  I then connect my RF generator with my Return Loss Bridge to the 50 ohm side.  I set the frequency on the RF Generator correctly and adjust the variable capacitor for the best return loss (typically -25-30 db).  Then, without changing the variable cap, I mount the L network in place.  I learned this method from my good Aussie friend Kerry.

 

I am not sure if a 50:2000 ohm “L” network would work well.  The Q might be too high.  You might try a pair of L networks in series.  Maybe a 50: 350 ohm and then a 350:2000 ohm.

 

Nick, as far as going down to 455 KHz, the SSNA has not been tested below 1 MHz.  You may have to modify the amp or substitute a MMIC for the amp.

Jerry W5JH

"building something without experimenting is just solder practice"

 

From: PHSNA@... [mailto:PHSNA@...] On Behalf Of n5ib@...
Sent: Saturday, October 05, 2013 3:34 PM
To: PHSNA@...
Subject: Re: [PHSNA] Measuring high impedance filters

 

 



Hi Nick,

 

I'd think you could use a broadband transformer. It ought to do OK over the fairly limited bandwidth of the filters.

For 50:2000 you'd need about a 1:6 turns ratio. And the reactance of the high-turns winding ought to be around 2000 ohms or better. That's around 70 uH at 5 MHz.

Ferrite cores should serve.

 

Or maybe a combination of techniques... 4:1 quadrafilar transformer to give 50:800 then attenuator pad to handle the remaining transformation. Wouldn't have to introduce so much loss, so maybe the level would be high enough for decent dynamic reange.

 

Jim, N5IB

 


Re: Measuring high impedance filters

Rod Wall
 

This may help,
 
Read the section on “Complex conjugate matching” at:
 
A Calculator:
You will need to 1st measure the centre frequency complex impedance for the ports for the filters. Might be easier to 1st search for the manufacturer's specifications. 
 
Regards,
 
Roderick Wall.
 
From: n5ib@...
Sent: ‎Sunday‎, ‎October‎ ‎6‎, ‎2013 ‎7‎:‎34‎ ‎AM
To: PHSNA@...
 
 



Hi Nick,
 
I'd think you could use a broadband transformer. It ought to do OK over the fairly limited bandwidth of the filters.
For 50:2000 you'd need about a 1:6 turns ratio. And the reactance of the high-turns winding ought to be around 2000 ohms or better. That's around 70 uH at 5 MHz.
Ferrite cores should serve.
 
Or maybe a combination of techniques... 4:1 quadrafilar transformer to give 50:800 then attenuator pad to handle the remaining transformation. Wouldn't have to introduce so much loss, so maybe the level would be high enough for decent dynamic reange.
 
Jim, N5IB
 

 


Re: Measuring high impedance filters

Rod Wall
 

Hi Nick,
 
This is a easy way to design matching circuits for your filters. But you will need a VNA not a SNA to produce s-parameter Touchstone file to load into RFsim99 software.
 
 
Regards,
 
Roderick Wall, vk3yc.
 
 
 
From: kennnick@...
Sent: ‎Sunday‎, ‎October‎ ‎6‎, ‎2013 ‎5‎:‎12‎ ‎AM
To: PHSNA@...
 
 

Since I do have a parallel universe version of the PHSNA working, I've been measuring a few things.  Most of my filters I'd already characterized point by point before developing the ability to auto scan.  But I have several commercial filters in my junkbox from hamfests: Heath, Kenwood, Yaesu, ICM etc, which I've not checked.  Some don't specify their design terminating resistance requirements and some are pretty high, like one from Heath that's 2000 ohms.

To match it to my 50 ohm system, I could use some sort of resonated transformer or maybe an L-match but that sounded complicated and might affect the filter's response.  Another way is to use minimum loss resistance pads.  Minimum loss is pretty high when you're going all the way from 50 to 2000 though.  It looks like 22 dB on the input and 22 on the output , so -44 dB total.  That could put the signal down in the dirt, so I need some amplification.  A while back I built a little broadband amplifier with 38 dB gain, using three MMICs in a line.
With this much difference in resistances, you just about don't have to calculate the matching pad.  Just put 50 ohms shunt to ground at the input and output connections, and 2000 ohms series from there to the filter In/Out terminals.
I had a fair amount of trouble with my noise floor while using the amplifier.  Initially it was only -25 dBm but just by moving components and cables around physically I got to -40 dBm.  Still way too high to show ultimate attenuation, but the shape and flattness and 3 dB BW ought to be OK.  I don't know though, this filter is marked 2.1 kHz but I showed about 1.2 kHz.  Is it my measurement method, or is it the filter?  Guess I should try some others.
What about filters that don't reveal their termination resistance requirement?  From what I understand, you  make measurements with various resistance values until the shape looks "right" and say, "that's it".  Sounds like a lot of work to me.
I wonder if we'll be able to do 455 kHz filters with this gizmo?  Hope so.

73,
Nick, WA5BDU

 


Re: Measuring high impedance filters

N5IB
 


Hi Nick,
 
I'd think you could use a broadband transformer. It ought to do OK over the fairly limited bandwidth of the filters.
For 50:2000 you'd need about a 1:6 turns ratio. And the reactance of the high-turns winding ought to be around 2000 ohms or better. That's around 70 uH at 5 MHz.
Ferrite cores should serve.
 
Or maybe a combination of techniques... 4:1 quadrafilar transformer to give 50:800 then attenuator pad to handle the remaining transformation. Wouldn't have to introduce so much loss, so maybe the level would be high enough for decent dynamic reange.
 
Jim, N5IB
 


Measuring high impedance filters

Nick Kennedy
 

Since I do have a parallel universe version of the PHSNA working, I've been measuring a few things.  Most of my filters I'd already characterized point by point before developing the ability to auto scan.  But I have several commercial filters in my junkbox from hamfests: Heath, Kenwood, Yaesu, ICM etc, which I've not checked.  Some don't specify their design terminating resistance requirements and some are pretty high, like one from Heath that's 2000 ohms.
To match it to my 50 ohm system, I could use some sort of resonated transformer or maybe an L-match but that sounded complicated and might affect the filter's response.  Another way is to use minimum loss resistance pads.  Minimum loss is pretty high when you're going all the way from 50 to 2000 though.  It looks like 22 dB on the input and 22 on the output , so -44 dB total.  That could put the signal down in the dirt, so I need some amplification.  A while back I built a little broadband amplifier with 38 dB gain, using three MMICs in a line.
With this much difference in resistances, you just about don't have to calculate the matching pad.  Just put 50 ohms shunt to ground at the input and output connections, and 2000 ohms series from there to the filter In/Out terminals.
I had a fair amount of trouble with my noise floor while using the amplifier.  Initially it was only -25 dBm but just by moving components and cables around physically I got to -40 dBm.  Still way too high to show ultimate attenuation, but the shape and flattness and 3 dB BW ought to be OK.  I don't know though, this filter is marked 2.1 kHz but I showed about 1.2 kHz.  Is it my measurement method, or is it the filter?  Guess I should try some others.
What about filters that don't reveal their termination resistance requirement?  From what I understand, you  make measurements with various resistance values until the shape looks "right" and say, "that's it".  Sounds like a lot of work to me.
I wonder if we'll be able to do 455 kHz filters with this gizmo?  Hope so.

73,
Nick, WA5BDU


Re: W7ZOI AD8307 RF Power Meter

patt896
 

Damn, say Hello.

 

Ranks with W1FB. 


Re: The Funduino

sigcom1
 

FWIW, I bought an UNO R3 'clone' from an eBay vendor in NY. Cost $12.50, shipped, and took about 3 days to arrive in SoCal. It came with a USB cable and fired right up. I noticed just now that his price has gone up to $13.50 but he does have another sale for $12.25 without the cable.

It ;s, however, pretty well blatantly a counterfeit. Marked "AREDUINO" and "UNO" on the component side with the correct font and the same "DESIGN IN ITALY" on the bottom side. A darned well built counterfeit but nonetheless, fake.

I was going to buy the R3 from a vendor in SoCal but he sold out before I got off my butt. But what he did/does have is something called a "Arduino Pro Mini Clone" which is not really an Arduino, per se, but does function like one. It's about 1/3 the size of an UNO R3 with the same functionality (except for the programming interface0. It has an ATMega328 with the Arduino boot loader 'burned' in. The programming interface is serial so if one only has USB, either a USB to serial adaptor ($6 from Hong Kong) is required. I suppose a UNO R3 could be lashed up to do the conversion for programming. All the usual I/O is brought out to solder pads around the edges of the board and three inline pin strips are included. It does not proclaim to be an Arduino and the only indentification is "deek-robot" on the underside of the board.

Anyway, I thought this would be an inexpensive method to control projects like the PHSNA.

I'll upload a pic. to the Group Photos section later this evening.

73.......Steve Smith WB6TNL





From: <n5ib@...>
To: <PHSNA@...>
Subject: [PHSNA] RE: Re: The Funduino
Date: 03 Oct 2013 14:00:43 -0700My Funduino UNO R3 arrived today from "Chipworld". It was marked "Funduino" and "Design in Italy" and WWW.FUNDUINO.CN" Cost was $14.30 including shipping. Ordered on 19 Sept, so took 14 days.

It was supposed to come with a short USB cable, but that was missing. There was a tear in the shipping envelope, which may explain the missing cable. All the other parts in the order were OK.
Quality appears quite good. Plugged it into an ASUS laptop running Win7-64. Found the driver seamlessly as COM5 (my Arduino apparently has dibs on COM4) and accepted the SSNA software. Runs fine.

Looks like these clones are the way to keep the SSNA under the $50 target.

Jim, N5IB


Re: W7ZOI AD8307 RF Power Meter

N5IB
 

Plus, the TS922 is only $1.44 at Mouser, vs better than $6 for the AD822. I only use the 820 and 822 'cause I have a handful of them.

In this application not a lot is demanded of the op amp. It's running virtually at DC, and the gain needed is only x2 or so. The important part is that it can operate from a singe supply at fairly low voltage, and the output can swing very nearly to ground (within a 100 mV or so) A 50 cent single or dual op amp can do the job, but it is nice to use the FET input amps.

Jim, N5IB


---In PHSNA@..., <phsna@...> wrote:

I’ve used as a drop-in replacement for the AD822  the TS922.  It has higher output drive, lower noise and is a little bit faster.