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Huntington Central and Mile Square birds - 4 OCT

Jeff Bray
 

At Huntington Central Park this morning, the CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER continued along the row of Eucalyptus that separate Armstrong Nursery from the park. I found a TENNESSEE WARBLER in the eucs on Gothcard Hill, which we later saw at the east end of the "island" area. The female-type AMERICAN REDSTART was at the east end of the "island" area as well, calling frequently. No sign of the BREWER'S SPARROW this morning.



Later at Mile Square Regional Park, we had the continuing LUCY'S WARBLER and BLACKPOLL WARBLER in the south and southwest areas of the Nature Center. The Blackpoll was calling often, helping to find it, but it stayed very high in the eucs and thus made it impossible to get any photographs. The LUCY'S WARBLER was first spotted in the old eucalyptus at the southwest corner that is full of sapsucker holes. A female Northern Red Bishop was in the Nature Area as well, which seemed a bit out of place. It was calling constantly, which threw us off, since it wasn't the type of call you typically hear from a bishop...


Good to see some migrant activity. 

Good birding!
Cheers,

--
Jeff Bray
Irvine, CA

James Pike
 

A comment on Jeff's photos of the Tennessee Warbler at HCP, especially the fortuitous one of the spread tail. The bird looks unlike all fall Tennessees I've seen in the state over the years, and strongly suggests an adult male. Pyle (1997) notes that the underparts of immature birds are "heavily washed yellow," unlike this bird. Adult females have a "medium-bright green" crown, while adult males have a "bluish gray crown with green mottling," as does this bird. Most importantly, immatures and adult females have "outer rectrices without white, or sometimes with small and indistinct whitish patches," whereas, in adult males, the two outermost rectrix pairs "average larger and more distinct white patches." Other details such as the dark primary coverts and the colorful, replaced tertials are indicative of an adult. However, if not for the spread-tail photo, calling this an adult male would have remained supposition. Cool stuff.

Jim Pike
HB  

On Fri, Oct 4, 2019 at 2:15 PM Jeff Bray <jbray4913@...> wrote:
At Huntington Central Park this morning, the CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER continued along the row of Eucalyptus that separate Armstrong Nursery from the park. I found a TENNESSEE WARBLER in the eucs on Gothcard Hill, which we later saw at the east end of the "island" area. The female-type AMERICAN REDSTART was at the east end of the "island" area as well, calling frequently. No sign of the BREWER'S SPARROW this morning.



Later at Mile Square Regional Park, we had the continuing LUCY'S WARBLER and BLACKPOLL WARBLER in the south and southwest areas of the Nature Center. The Blackpoll was calling often, helping to find it, but it stayed very high in the eucs and thus made it impossible to get any photographs. The LUCY'S WARBLER was first spotted in the old eucalyptus at the southwest corner that is full of sapsucker holes. A female Northern Red Bishop was in the Nature Area as well, which seemed a bit out of place. It was calling constantly, which threw us off, since it wasn't the type of call you typically hear from a bishop...


Good to see some migrant activity. 

Good birding!
Cheers,

--
Jeff Bray
Irvine, CA