Date   

Pine Siskin

Maury Swoveland
 

At least 6 Pine Siskin seen at Aurora Park this morning in the trees off the path between the Playground and Baseball field, parking on Via Guadix where Aberto intersects only a few steps to where the birds have been seen for a few days. Birds were in the trees for over an hour, and some remained after I left. 


Brown Thrasher was also out for sometime on winding path leading to the lower level near Marguerite. The Thrasher was on the grass and dirt by a sycamore tree, where there are palm fronds on the bushes. 

Mountain Chickadee also seen at the East end of the soccer field in a eucalyptus.



Maury Swoveland
Mission Viejo




Chasing Year Birds

Tom Harrison
 

Birding Friends,

Lucky morning, January 22.

The Green-tailed Towhee and Golden Crown Sparrows were showing nicely this morning at Harriet Weider Park, thanks to some birders who put out seed on the path in the NW corner of the park. California Thrasher singing and visible as well. Didn't see Fox Sparrow.

The continuing Mountain Plover was still present at Bolsa Chica.

The Wandering Tattler was on the Corona del Mar Main Beach jetty (channel side) as was a Black Turnstone.

The Brown-crested Flycatcher was behind the Robert Lange Preschool flycatching along the creek.

Didn't re-find the Brown Thrasher at Aurora Park.

The trip home is so much nicer when you get the bird.

Tom Harrison
San Clemente



Pine Siskin

Maury Swoveland
 

Pine Siskin still in trees on path between baseball field and playground. At least 6 makes and females. Pictures to follow. 

Maury Swoveland
Mission Viejo


Black scoter

Don Hoechlin
 

The black scoter is feeding under the Huntington Beach pier now.
Don Hoechlin
RMV


Pine Siskin

Don Hoechlin
 

Three pine siskins are present at Aurora Park in the Liquid Ambers near the street and playground area.
Don Hoechlin
RMV


Gray Warbler at Quail Hill Trail

Pete Gordon
 

Good afternoon,

The Gray Warbler is here at the bare Sycamore just across from the Fire Station on Fossil Road.  Moving between the bare tree and the grass.

Pete Gordon
Foothill Ranch 

--

Pete Gordon
Foothill Ranch, CA

 


Little Blue Heron

Don Hoechlin
 

The Little Blue Heron is feeding inside Talbert Marsh.
Don Hoechlin
RMV


Black Scoter today

Rick Shearer
 

Hi OC Birders, just before 10 a.m. today, MLK Day, I spotted the reported Black Scoter to the left of the pier as I was walking out.  There were 4 Surf Scoters closer to the surfline, beyond the surfers.  The BLSC was all by himself about equal with the restaurant at the end of the pier, but about 100 yards to the south.  You could tell it was he because of the yellow bill, noticeable even from a distance.  To my surprise the bird started swimming towards the pier until it went under the pier somewhere between the restaurant and the restrooms at the middle of the pier.  I was there with my camera and got numerous pictures of it, like this one on Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/tiorickshearer/49415880608/in/dateposted/.  
I waited for the bird to come out on the other side of the pier but it never did.  I think I saw it swim back out on the left side as I was returning to PCH, but it kept its back to me so I'm not 100% positive.  

Rick Shearer
HB

--
Rick Shearer
HB


Brown Thrasher

Maury Swoveland
 

Bird containing in same location as mentioned this weekend. Seen today around 10:33 AM. On the grass and dirt near the shrubs next to the winding path leading down to the lower level near Marguerite Parkway. Brown Thrasher was in the open for at least 5 minutes, in two different locations. Skies overcast so photo’s very high ISO but turned out better than expected. 

Link to photos from ebird checklist https://ebird.org/checklist/S63599841


Maury Swoveland
Mission Viejo




Wandering Tattler

Don Hoechlin
 

Was never sure what Wandering Tattlers ate but the one at Corona Del Mar SB apparently has a like for crab legs. 
Don Hoechlin
RMV


Green-Tailed Towhee still present at Harriet Weider (pict)

Clark Snodgrass
 

The green-tailed towhee continues at Harriet Weider park in HB..   in the main park area  to the north or sometime west of the playground equipment in the north west corner

Pict is here
https://www.flickr.com/photos/137464283@N06/49412197133/in/dateposted-public/

Clark Snodgrass
Huntington Beach


Wandering Tattler

Don Hoechlin
 

Had a great morning at Corona Del Mar SB this morning watching both the Wandering Tattler and Black Turnstone feeding on the rocks next to the walkway. Also had a Common Loon float by. 
Don Hoechlin
RMV


Re: Cedar Waxwings

Mike Kory
 

Hi Terry,
I saw them a week or so ago at SJM in the trees to the right of the Audubon house/gift shop.
As far as learning their song, I don’t know your age, but hopefully your hearing is better than mine. I no longer can hear their high pitched calls. I see a flock and know they must be making noise, but can’t hear a thing. I can hear most all bird calls (I think!?) but not them. 

I have also seen them at Sheep Hills Park in Aliso Viejo, but not for a couple weeks. 
Good luck!

Mike Kory
Charleston, IL
(but visiting in Laguna Hills for a couple months)


Re: Cedar Waxwings

 

In past years, I’ve seen flocks of them on the CSUF campus, most often north of the library. Haven’t been up there this year.

We also get them in Mission Viejo parks, but never consistently.

-Bob Allen
Author, Wildflowers of Orange County and the Santa Ana Mountains


XsMAX

On Jan 18, 2020, at 7:18 PM, Ryan Winkleman <rswinkleman@...> wrote:


Terry,

Cedar Waxwings are widespread throughout Orange County in winter, although this can vary from year to year (this year seems to be on the lower end for abundance). They can typically be found where there are fruiting trees and shrubs. Doesn't matter if it's natural habitat, a manicured park, or even a business park. They like fruiting trees and shrubs, and they like to sit up in tall trees (I see them in sycamores most frequently, I think).

The problem is that if you've got some search image and you're just going around trying to find them sitting in the open, it's really freaking hard. They can move around in huge flocks, but they love to land in trees and blend in with foliage and then many times just sit there motionless forever. What's probably easiest is to learn their vocalizations, if you haven't already (note that they can at times sound somewhat like European Starlings). Greater than 9 times out of 10 I find Cedar Waxwings because I hear them first, either flying overhead or sitting in vegetation. I would suggest learning what they sound like first, and then you may find them a lot easier. You can review the map in eBird for recent sightings but with waxwings I often just find them when I'm not even trying, because I hear them in the area.

On Sat, Jan 18, 2020, 6:27 PM kk6t <terry@...> wrote:
I hope this is OK to post, excuse me if it's not.

I'd love to photograph some Cedar Waxwings and have been to SJM several times but without luck.  Is anyone seeing them at SJM or elsewhere and if so, where.  

Thanks in advance for any tips.

Terry


--
Ryan Winkleman
Rancho Santa Margarita


Re: Cedar Waxwings

Ryan Winkleman
 

Terry,

Cedar Waxwings are widespread throughout Orange County in winter, although this can vary from year to year (this year seems to be on the lower end for abundance). They can typically be found where there are fruiting trees and shrubs. Doesn't matter if it's natural habitat, a manicured park, or even a business park. They like fruiting trees and shrubs, and they like to sit up in tall trees (I see them in sycamores most frequently, I think).

The problem is that if you've got some search image and you're just going around trying to find them sitting in the open, it's really freaking hard. They can move around in huge flocks, but they love to land in trees and blend in with foliage and then many times just sit there motionless forever. What's probably easiest is to learn their vocalizations, if you haven't already (note that they can at times sound somewhat like European Starlings). Greater than 9 times out of 10 I find Cedar Waxwings because I hear them first, either flying overhead or sitting in vegetation. I would suggest learning what they sound like first, and then you may find them a lot easier. You can review the map in eBird for recent sightings but with waxwings I often just find them when I'm not even trying, because I hear them in the area.

On Sat, Jan 18, 2020, 6:27 PM kk6t <terry@...> wrote:
I hope this is OK to post, excuse me if it's not.

I'd love to photograph some Cedar Waxwings and have been to SJM several times but without luck.  Is anyone seeing them at SJM or elsewhere and if so, where.  

Thanks in advance for any tips.

Terry


--
Ryan Winkleman
Rancho Santa Margarita


Re: Cedar Waxwings

Ben Newhouse
 

Sorry...  Forgot to sign that last post.  This is Ben Newhouse, Seal Beach.  :)

I saw some cedar waxwings at Rush Park in Rossmoor early in the month. I haven’t been at that location since, but they may still be there. It’s not the county’s most amazing birding location, but there’s a decent grouping of trees in the southwest corner that seems to host some birds. And there were cedar waxwings there recently. The below eBird list I put up has one pic and location info. 


Ben
Seal Beach


On Sat, Jan 18, 2020 at 6:39 PM Ben Newhouse via Groups.Io <bnewhouse=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I saw some cedar waxwings at Rush Park In Rossmoor early in the month. I haven’t been at that location since, but they may still be there. It’s not the county’s most amazing birding location, but there’s a decent grouping of trees in the southwest corner that seems to host some birds. And there were cedar waxwings there recently. The below eBird list I put up has one pic and location info. 

https://ebird.org/checklist/S62928482


On Jan 18, 2020, at 6:27 PM, kk6t <terry@...> wrote:

I hope this is OK to post, excuse me if it's not.

I'd love to photograph some Cedar Waxwings and have been to SJM several times but without luck.  Is anyone seeing them at SJM or elsewhere and if so, where.  

Thanks in advance for any tips.

Terry




Re: Cedar Waxwings

Ben Newhouse
 

I saw some cedar waxwings at Rush Park In Rossmoor early in the month. I haven’t been at that location since, but they may still be there. It’s not the county’s most amazing birding location, but there’s a decent grouping of trees in the southwest corner that seems to host some birds. And there were cedar waxwings there recently. The below eBird list I put up has one pic and location info. 

On Jan 18, 2020, at 6:27 PM, kk6t <terry@...> wrote:

I hope this is OK to post, excuse me if it's not.

I'd love to photograph some Cedar Waxwings and have been to SJM several times but without luck.  Is anyone seeing them at SJM or elsewhere and if so, where.  

Thanks in advance for any tips.

Terry


Cedar Waxwings

kk6t
 

I hope this is OK to post, excuse me if it's not.

I'd love to photograph some Cedar Waxwings and have been to SJM several times but without luck.  Is anyone seeing them at SJM or elsewhere and if so, where.  

Thanks in advance for any tips.

Terry


Hooded Mergansers

borodayko
 

Greetings, I walked around San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary in Irvine this morning, Sat. In the channel at the foot bridge northeast of pond C, there were 5 Hooded Mergansers (a pair on the north side and three on the south side of the bridge). I posted two photos in the Waterfowl folder. I was carrying my Canon SX 280 digital camera so I was able to post photos today.

Enjoy, Al


Re: Gray Flycatcher, Quail Hill

Mike Sanders
 

Gray Flycatcher continues at S end of willow channel near entrance to parking lot.

Mike Sanders
Trabuco Cyn


On Jan 18, 2020, at 11:21, Becky & Steve Turley via Groups.Io <turlslb@...> wrote:

Birders, 
We just observed a Gray Flycatcher near the Quail Hill parking lot.  Sat., Jan. 18, 11 am.    It was in the trees at the north end and then working the WillowS along east side of parking lot.  Gray empid,  yellowish wash on underparts,  tail dipping.
Becky & Steve Turley 
Long Beach 

--
Mike Sanders
Trabuco Canyon