Date   
locked Re: >>>THREAD CLOSED<<< Painted Lady butterfly migration

Debbie Hanson
 

They're coming through my yard in Yorba Linda!

Debbie Hanson
Yorba Linda

locked Re: >>>THREAD CLOSED<<< Painted Lady butterfly migration

tgmiko@gmail.com
 

1. I have seen Black Phoebes catching and eating them.
2. KPCC had a short report (I can't remember if it was only a local report or on the national NPR broadcast, but they said that the Painted Ladies are flying up from Mexico because there are too many of them for the local plant life to support (I was driving and only half paying attention). Regardless, this large movement/migration appears to be cyclical, but not annual. Maybe based on prime numbers, like cicada populations (because they only become visible--therefore edible every few years, no predators can base their diet or life cycle on cicadas)...
Tom Miko
Chattanooga, Hamilton County TN
909.241.3300

On Tue, Mar 12, 2019, 3:45 PM bugbob via Groups.Io <bugbob=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
I hope that wasn’t from a news outlet, since it’s erroneous. Sadly typical for most news outlets.

Painted lady butterfly adults are coming from the deserts, where they spent their immature stages eating native plants (mostly borages), pupating, and recently eclosed. They are emigrating (=exiting) from the desert; they do not migrate (migration includes a return trip).

I just returned from 3 days in Anza Borrego where they are in huge numbers. Many painted ladies along the way through Irvine to Orange today.

I’ve never seen birds eating them but I don’t doubt that they do. Saw many good birds in Anza Borrego but none on the painted ladies.

-Bob Allen
Mission Viejo, CA
Author, Wildflowers of Orange County and the Santa Ana Mountains
XsMAX

On Mar 12, 2019, at 12:27 PM, Alex Tolkachev <atolkachev@...> wrote:

I have been watching thousand of butterflies flying through Aliso Viejo in roughly North-Westerly direction today. Turns out they are Painted Lady, smaller cousin of Monarch, and there has been a news story on them. A “billion” butterflies are expected to migrate through SoCal on the way from Mexico to their breeding areas in Oregon.

I wonder which birds and at what hotspots are getting excited about this. Not that I don’t wish the butterflies a safe journey en masse, but it would be nice to see and photograph a frenzied hunt. 

--
Alex Tolkachev, Irvine

locked Re: >>>THREAD CLOSED<<< Painted Lady butterfly migration

Craig Hoover
 

Costa Mesa too!  I stopped by the Muth Interpretive Center moments ago but the attendant couldn't speak to what was going on.  Thank you!

Craig Hoover
Costa Mesa CA


On Tue, Mar 12, 2019 at 12:27 PM Alex Tolkachev <atolkachev@...> wrote:
I have been watching thousand of butterflies flying through Aliso Viejo in roughly North-Westerly direction today. Turns out they are Painted Lady, smaller cousin of Monarch, and there has been a news story on them. A “billion” butterflies are expected to migrate through SoCal on the way from Mexico to their breeding areas in Oregon.

I wonder which birds and at what hotspots are getting excited about this. Not that I don’t wish the butterflies a safe journey en masse, but it would be nice to see and photograph a frenzied hunt. 

--
Alex Tolkachev, Irvine



--
Craig Hoover
Costa Mesa, CA

locked Re: >>>THREAD CLOSED<<< Painted Lady butterfly migration

Ed Stonick
 

Hi Tom!

John O. and I birded Hahamongna, which was SO depressing! They've DESTROYED it! Then we tried (futilly) for the Zone-tail. They were HUNDREDS of Painted Ladies at both places.

Ed



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: tgmiko@...
Date: 3/12/19 1:28 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: Bob Allen <bugbob@...>
Cc: Orangecountybirding <OrangeCountyBirding@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OrangeCountyBirding] Painted Lady butterfly migration

1. I have seen Black Phoebes catching and eating them.
2. KPCC had a short report (I can't remember if it was only a local report or on the national NPR broadcast, but they said that the Painted Ladies are flying up from Mexico because there are too many of them for the local plant life to support (I was driving and only half paying attention). Regardless, this large movement/migration appears to be cyclical, but not annual. Maybe based on prime numbers, like cicada populations (because they only become visible--therefore edible every few years, no predators can base their diet or life cycle on cicadas)...
Tom Miko
Chattanooga, Hamilton County TN
909.241.3300

On Tue, Mar 12, 2019, 3:45 PM bugbob via Groups.Io <bugbob=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
I hope that wasn’t from a news outlet, since it’s erroneous. Sadly typical for most news outlets.

Painted lady butterfly adults are coming from the deserts, where they spent their immature stages eating native plants (mostly borages), pupating, and recently eclosed. They are emigrating (=exiting) from the desert; they do not migrate (migration includes a return trip).

I just returned from 3 days in Anza Borrego where they are in huge numbers. Many painted ladies along the way through Irvine to Orange today.

I’ve never seen birds eating them but I don’t doubt that they do. Saw many good birds in Anza Borrego but none on the painted ladies.

-Bob Allen
Mission Viejo, CA
Author, Wildflowers of Orange County and the Santa Ana Mountains
XsMAX

On Mar 12, 2019, at 12:27 PM, Alex Tolkachev <atolkachev@...> wrote:

I have been watching thousand of butterflies flying through Aliso Viejo in roughly North-Westerly direction today. Turns out they are Painted Lady, smaller cousin of Monarch, and there has been a news story on them. A “billion” butterflies are expected to migrate through SoCal on the way from Mexico to their breeding areas in Oregon.

I wonder which birds and at what hotspots are getting excited about this. Not that I don’t wish the butterflies a safe journey en masse, but it would be nice to see and photograph a frenzied hunt. 

--
Alex Tolkachev, Irvine

locked Re: >>>THREAD CLOSED<<< Painted Lady butterfly migration

Ryan Winkleman
 

All,
 
While this is definitely a cool event currently taking place, Jeff and I have decided to close this thread as it was only ever thinly related to Orange County birding in the first place, and now has no real relation to it. Please keep in mind that as stated on the homepage, threads on this listserv should be about birding or birds in Orange County.
 
Thanks for your understanding.

--
Ryan Winkleman
Rancho Santa Margarita

Orange County RBA: March 14, 2019

Ryan Winkleman
 

RBA

 

* California

* Orange County

* March 14, 2019

* CAOC19.03.14

 

This is the Orange County, CA weekly Rare Bird Alert (RBA) and local events summary. California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) review species are capitalized and marked with asterisks below. All documentation of review species should be forwarded to the CBRC secretary, Tom Benson, at secretary@....

 

BIRDS MENTIONED

 

Laughing Gull

Mew Gull

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron

Bald Eagle

Gray Flycatcher

California Scrub-Jay

Bewick's Wren

Orchard Oriole

Palm Warbler

 

A first-cycle LAUGHING GULL that was found on January 23 at North Lake in Irvine continued through March 9. The bird is typically found in the southern half of the lake, often close to Barranca, where it basically just sits around all day eating food that people throw to it. Easy parking is in the lot off of Barranca and Lake.

 

A first-cycle MEW GULL continued at Mile Square Regional Park in Fountain Valley through March 8.

 

A single second-year YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON continued to Linger at Dana Point Harbor in Dana Point on March 10 behind the Nordhavn building. My Dreams of Orange County getting its first ever Yellow-crowned Night-Heron nesting record in 2019 are slowly fading...

 

An immature BALD EAGLE was photographed at Upper Newport Bay in Newport Beach on March 10. This bird is not quite as old as Jeff, whose birthday was yesterday.

 

The two wintering GRAY FLYCATCHERS continued at Mile Square Regional Park in Fountain Valley and at Irvine Regional Park in Orange, both through March 12. The Fountain Valley bird is typically seen near the northern entrance off Edinger along the golf course fence line, whereas the Orange bird is typically around Parking Lot 2. 


A CALIFORNIA SCRUB-JAY was an unusual find at Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve in Huntington Beach on March 8. Like Bewick's Wren (see rant below), this species is rare in Huntington Beach and should always be well-documented. You can consider future documentation an ongoing gift to Jeff, whose birthday was yesterday. The bird was in the palms by the tide gate.


A BEWICK'S WREN was out of place at Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve in Huntington Beach on March 8. Even though this species does not get flagged in the north coastal area in eBird (because it can be commonly found in the southern, *cooler* half of the county), Bewick's Wren should always be well-documented anywhere in Huntington Beach, where it is actually quite rare, and is actually almost never supported with any documentation in eBird. Birders in Huntington Beach should make an extra effort to obtain confirmation if they think they see or hear a Bewick's Wren, or they may risk getting a dreaded email from me asking for more information or even going on Brian Daniels' blacklist for birds reported at Huntington Central Park with no documentation. Plus since Jeff's birthday was yesterday it can be a great gift to him!


An adult male ORCHARD ORIOLE was photographed in a residential yard in Anaheim on March 10.

 

Up to two PALM WARBLERS continued at San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary in Irvine through March 11. They are typically seen in Pond D. Jeff did not see them during his field trip on March 10, despite it being his birthday week (birds don't care about your birthday).

 


LOCAL EVENTS

 

UPCOMING EVENTS THAT DO NOT REQUIRE ADVANCE RESERVATIONS

 

The Bolsa Chica Bird Walk at Bolsa Chica Wetlands will take place on March 21 from 8:00am to 12:00pm. Meet at the Harriet Wieder Regional Park playground area.

 

 

UPCOMING EVENTS THAT REQUIRE ADVANCE RESERVATIONS

 

The Big Morongo Preserve field trip will take place on April 27. More details can be found here: http://www.seaandsageaudubon.org/FieldTrips/Trips/MorongoPreserve.html

 

 

WORKSHOPS AND CLASSES

 

Two bird banding workshops will be held at Audubon Starr Ranch Sanctuary in Trabuco Canyon in March 2019. The beginning workshop was held already and the advanced workshop will be held on March 16 and 17. For more details or to enroll, email seasonal ornithologist Robert Snowden at rsnowden@....

 

 

*****************************************************

 

The Orange County RBA and events summary is produced weekly by Ryan Winkleman and Jeff Bray in collaboration with Doug Willick. Sightings of rare birds can be posted to the OrangeCountyBirding listserv, emailed directly to Jeff Bray (jbray4913@...) and/or Ryan Winkleman (rswinkleman@...), and/or submitted to eBird (http://ebird.org/content/ebird). Any supporting details (descriptions, photos, audio recordings, etc.) of rare sightings that are not already disclosed on the listserv or on eBird should also be emailed to Ryan Winkleman separately for consideration to be mentioned in the current quarterly report for North American Birds.

 

Those sightings that are included in this summary generally include those that are considered rare (regionally or seasonally) for Orange County based on "The Birds of Orange County: Status and Distribution" (Hamilton and Willick), "Birds of Southern California" (Garrett and Dunn), and/or more contemporary changes in local or regional status and distribution. Rarities that regularly or seasonally occur at a particular location, such as annually wintering rarities on Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge, may not be included in this digest, but reports of these same species occurring at other, atypical locations throughout the county may be included. We don't include hybrids, subspecies, introduced or exotic birds, or in most cases and for no real reason, geese. All bird reports are vetted to the extent possible prior to each publication, but in the interest of sharing information, the accuracy of any given report cannot always be guaranteed, nor can the presence of any given bird for those who choose to chase after them.

 

Information on upcoming local events is taken largely from the Sea and Sage Audubon website (http://www.seaandsageaudubon.org/). Sea and Sage Audubon is based out of the Audubon House at the San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary in Irvine. They sponsor a number of public field trips, special birding events, conservation lectures, and social gatherings throughout the year. Information regarding upcoming local events should be considered accurate at the time of this posting. However, for the most current information please refer to the field trip list on the Sea and Sage Audubon website at http://www.seaandsageaudubon.org/FieldTrips/FieldTripSchedule.html. It is also recommended that you refer to that website immediately prior to engaging in any field trip to confirm that trips are still occurring. If you know of additional upcoming events that are not sponsored directly by Sea and Sage Audubon, please email Ryan Winkleman and/or Jeff Bray for inclusion. #RBA


--
Ryan Winkleman
Rancho Santa Margarita

Highlights of March 15 Harriett Wieder Park Monthly Bird Count

Terry Hill
 

On the March 15 Harriett Wieder Park monthly bird count, I spotted a male Lawrence’s Goldfinch in among some Lesser & American Goldfinches, and the rest of my group (Lena Hayashi, Sheila Harlow, and 3 others) all got on it as well.  We ended up spotting a second male and one female as well.  I texted Brian Daniels to let him know, but he was working and indicated he had it on his list for HW.  It was an exciting find for us, though, and a new bird for Bolsa Chica for me.  We found them in the black willows on the Bolsa Chica side of Fisher’s Gulch, on the southwest side.  However, they did disappear after 5 or 10 minutes.  We also had one Sooty Fox Sparrow on the same side of the lower part of Fisher’s Gulch.  There was a lot of water in the Bolsa Chica cells, and many ducks, Avocets, and Stilts were present.  There were also thousands of the Painted Lady Butterflies flying by (a bit distracting when you’re trying to look for birds!).  
--
Terry Hill
Huntington Beach

Short Eared Owl & Lots of Elegant Terns at Bolsa Chica

Terry Hill
 

I just got a call this evening from Peter Knapp, Fish & Wildlife Volunteer at Bolsa Chica, who advised me that at least 1,000 Elegant Terns (with 6-7 Royal Terns) were there about 2:30 this afternoon (March 15).   They were on the exposed mudflats in the full tidal basin just beyond the PCH walk bridge.  He said they weren’t around in the morning, so they’ve just arrived.  In addition, yesterday (March 14), about 11:00 a.m., he accidentally flushed a Short-eared Owl in the tall clover mid-way along Nest Site 1, which runs southeast behind the fence at the end of the boardwalk.  The owl flew out, then did come back and land again.  But he said it can’t be seen when in it's in the vegetation, so unless you see it flying, it’s not likely to be seen from the public area.
--
Terry Hill
Huntington Beach

Hairy Woodpecker at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary - 16 MAR

Jeff Bray
 

For those interested, there was a female Hairy Woodpecker that was behind the main office at Tucker this morning. Looks like Trish Gussler first discovered this bird back on March 10. Bruce and I saw it from the Harding Truck Trail, about 50-60 feet past the main gate, where the trail bends to the right. It was calling.

Photo of the bird in the checklist:

Cheers

--
Jeff Bray
Irvine, CA

Dana Point Harbor

Sachi Fukuman
 

I went kayaking outside the harbor today and saw hundreds of Black-vented Shearwaters and few dozens Painted Ladies flying by!
--
Sachi Fukuman
San Clemente

Silverado Canyon: 3/17

Ryan Seppala
 

Today (3/17), I hiked up Silverado Canyon, going from the Maple Springs gate to slightly beyond Bigcone Spring. I birded for a while with Trish Gussler as well as on my own. Highlights included a COMMON POORWILL flushed a ways from the main road, early PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHERS and WARBLING VIREOS, some MOUNTAIN QUAIL (including one seen), a RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD near Bigcone Spring, a HAIRY WOODPECKER heard across the upper canyon, a super early HERMIT WARBLER at Bigcone Spring, and a heard-only CANYON WREN as I headed back down, singing high above the third stream crossing from the gate. Trish got a Canyon Wren a few hours before I did, which was almost certainly the same one.

FYI, the Maple Springs gate is closed to vehicles due to the rain and may stay that way for some time, considering that a couple paved sections of the lower road have been washed out. You'll need to hike or bike in for now.

Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53956122

--
Ryan Seppala
Orange

Orange County RBA: March 21, 2019

Jeff Bray
 

RBA

* California
* Orange County
* March 21, 2019
* CAOC19.03.21
 
This is the Orange County, CA weekly Rare Bird Alert (RBA) and local events summary. California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) review species are capitalized and marked with asterisks below. All documentation of review species should be forwarded to the CBRC secretary, Tom Benson, at secretary@....
 
BIRDS MENTIONED
 
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
Hairy Woodpecker
Gray Flycatcher
White-throated Sparrow
Palm Warbler
Hermit Warbler

A YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON was photographed at Dana Point Harbor in Dana Point on March 19. Ryan’s dreams of Orange County getting its first ever Yellow-crowned Night-Heron nesting record in 2019 might be true! This observer's photograph shows an adult Yellow-crowned Night-Heron sitting in a nest. It’s not known if it has another Yellow-crowned Night-Heron as a mate, or if it’s shacked up with a local Black-crowned Night-Heron. Time will tell!

A HAIRY WOODPECKER was discovered at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Lake Forest (Modjeska Canyon) on March 10 and continued through March 16. It’s a bit of a low elevation to have that species around, although not terribly uncommon. It’s been mostly heard only, around the main office.

A GRAY FLYCATCHER continued at Mile Square Regional Park in Fountain Valley through March 19. The Fountain Valley bird is typically seen near the northern entrance off Edinger along the golf course fence line.

A WHITE-THROATED SPARROW continued at Irvine Regional Park in Orange through March 17. It is typically found along the path between the horse stables and the maintenance building. 

Up to two PALM WARBLERS continued at San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary in Irvine through March 19. They are typically seen in Pond D. 

A HERMIT WARBLER was photographed up Silverado Canyon near Bigcone Spring on March 17. This adult male bird is likely a wintering individual, as this would be unprecedentedly early for a migrant. 


LOCAL EVENTS

UPCOMING EVENTS THAT DO NOT REQUIRE ADVANCE RESERVATIONS

The Upper Newport Bay bird walk will take place on Sunday March 31 from 8:00am to 11:00am. Meet at the Big Canyon parking lot. 

The monthly Nature Walk at San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary will take place on April 6 from 9:00am to 10:30am. Meet at the Audubon House. 

The monthly Bird Walk at San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary will take place on April 14 from 8:00am to 12:00pm. Meet at the Audubon House. 


UPCOMING EVENTS THAT REQUIRE ADVANCE RESERVATIONS

The next amazing Sea and Sage Spring Pelagic trip will take place on Saturday, May 4.  Spots are still available! If you’re interested, please e-mail Nancy Kenyon: nancykenyon@...


WORKSHOPS AND CLASSES

None taking place

*****************************************************

The Orange County RBA and events summary is produced weekly by Ryan Winkleman and Jeff Bray in collaboration with Doug Willick. Sightings of rare birds can be posted to the OrangeCountyBirding listserv, emailed directly to Jeff Bray (jbray4913@...) and/or Ryan Winkleman (rswinkleman@...), and/or submitted to eBird (http://ebird.org/content/ebird). Any supporting details (descriptions, photos, audio recordings, etc.) of rare sightings that are not already disclosed on the listserv or on eBird should also be emailed to Ryan Winkleman separately for consideration to be mentioned in the current quarterly report for North American Birds.

Those sightings that are included in this summary generally include those that are considered rare (regionally or seasonally) for Orange County based on "The Birds of Orange County: Status and Distribution" (Hamilton and Willick), "Birds of Southern California" (Garrett and Dunn), and/or more contemporary changes in local or regional status and distribution. Rarities that regularly or seasonally occur at a particular location, such as annually wintering rarities on Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge, may not be included in this digest, but reports of these same species occurring at other, atypical locations throughout the county may be included. We don't include hybrids, subspecies, introduced or exotic birds, or in most cases and for no real reason, geese. All bird reports are vetted to the extent possible prior to each publication, but in the interest of sharing information, the accuracy of any given report cannot always be guaranteed, nor can the presence of any given bird for those who choose to chase after them.

Information on upcoming local events is taken largely from the Sea and Sage Audubon website (http://www.seaandsageaudubon.org/). Sea and Sage Audubon is based out of the Audubon House at the San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary in Irvine. They sponsor a number of public field trips, special birding events, conservation lectures, and social gatherings throughout the year. Information regarding upcoming local events should be considered accurate at the time of this posting. However, for the most current information please refer to the field trip list on the Sea and Sage Audubon website at http://www.seaandsageaudubon.org/FieldTrips/FieldTripSchedule.html. It is also recommended that you refer to that website immediately prior to engaging in any field trip to confirm that trips are still occurring. If you know of additional upcoming events that are not sponsored directly by Sea and Sage Audubon, please email Ryan Winkleman and/or Jeff Bray for inclusion. #RBA


--
Jeff Bray
Irvine, CA

Dana Point Harbor

Sachi Fukuman
 

Today we kayaked in the harbor and saw 5 Black Oystercatchers on the outside jetty. On the inside channel was a Pacific Loon.
--
Sachi Fukuman
San Clemente

Irvine Regional Park - Vesper Sparrow - 22 MAR

Jeff Bray
 

I spent a good part of the morning hiking all over Irvine Regional Park. I found a Vesper Sparrow up on Puma Ridge, mixed in with a flock of Savannah Sparrows. The White-throated Sparrow continued between the maintenance yard and the horse stables. The Gray Flycatcher continued to the WNW of lot 2. I was hearing Lawrence's Goldfinch all over the park, mostly flight calls. Heaviest concentration still seems to be west of lot 2, in the fiddle neck. On the east end of the park there were two Merlin together in a tree, a first for me seeing two together. And there was a Sharp-shinned Hawk at the east end as well. A beautiful day out there. 

Checklist here with some photos of the birds mentioned above.

Cheers!

--
Jeff Bray
Irvine, CA

William Mason Park and San Joaquin

Tom Harrison
 

I spent the morning birding both sides of William Mason Park and then I did a quick stop at San Joaquin.

Highlights for me were FOS Bullock’s Oriole and Wilson’s Warbler at Mason and Bell’s Vireo at San Joaquin. Also a cooperative Great Horned Owl and at least six Cal Thrashers singing from bush tops at Mason.

Tom Harrison
San Clemente

FOS Hooded Oriel

Julian Whitelegge
 

Heard and then saw first Hooded Oriel of the season in my front yard - young male.
Julian Whitelegge,
Newport Heights, Costa Mesa 

Parrots at Irvine Regional Park (rant)

Jeff Bray
 

Sorry to those that could care less about exoitcs, but I need to address the "Yellow-headed" Parrot that continues to be incorrectly reported at Irvine Regional Park. (and please don't waste your time emailing me about how I shouldn't be talking about exotics on the group, I really don't care)

The bird is a hybrid of some kind. Either Red-crowned X Turquoise-fronted or Yellow-headed X Turquoise-fronted, but it's not a "clean" Yellow-headed Parrot. It has a lot of red in the face and the beak is the wrong color to support Yellow-headed. If you want to see a "clean" one, you should check out the parrot roost in Santa Ana at Angels Community Park. Parrots at Irvine Regional Park consist of mostly Red-crowned, some Lilac-crowned and then a handful of hybrids. If you see this bird at the park, please report is as amazona sp.

Some pics I took this evening of the "Yellow-headed" bird are in the checklist below, along with some other photos of the common parrots you'll see at Irvine Regional Park.


Squawk...

--
Jeff Bray
Irvine, CA

Orange County RBA: March 28, 2019

Jeff Bray
 

RBA

* California
* Orange County
* March 28, 2019
* CAOC19.03.28
 
This is the Orange County, CA weekly Rare Bird Alert (RBA) and local events summary. California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) review species are capitalized and marked with asterisks below. All documentation of review species should be forwarded to the CBRC secretary, Tom Benson, at secretary@....
 
BIRDS MENTIONED
 
Mew Gull
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
Gray Flycatcher
Plumbeous Vireo
White-throated Sparrow
Vesper Sparrow
Black-and-white Warbler
Palm Warbler

An adult MEW GULL was at Warner Basin in Anaheim on March 21.

An immature YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON continued at Dana Point Harbor in Dana Point on March 24, and an adult continued at a nest at Doheny State Beach on the same date. Based on the observations of Robert McNab and Ryan Winkleman, it does not appear likely that this is actually an active nest (yet, anyway). However, we will continue to observe the bird and see if it appears that actual active nesting is occurring over time. If so, this would be the first known nesting attempt for this species in Orange County.

A GRAY FLYCATCHER continued at Mile Square Regional Park in Fountain Valley through March 26, and another continued at Irvine Regional Park in Orange through March 24. The Fountain Valley bird is typically seen near the northern entrance off Edinger along the golf course fence line, whereas the Orange bird is typically around Parking Lot 2.

A PLUMBEOUS VIREO was found at Twila Reid Park in Anaheim on March 24 and continued through March 27. If you chase it, be aware that apparently you have to stand at the pines and look up for the bird until your head falls off.

A WHITE-THROATED SPARROW continued at Irvine Regional Park in Orange through March 27. It is typically found along the path between the horse stables and the maintenance building. 

A VESPER SPARROW was found up on the mesa portion of the Puma Ridge Trail at Irvine Regional Park in Orange on March 22 and continued through March 24. It has been loosely associating with a flock of Savannah Sparrows but is not tied to them.

A long-staying BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER continued at Aurora Park in Mission Viejo on March 27, and another bird was reported at Mile Square Regional Park in Fountain Valley, north of the Nature Center, on March 26.

A PALM WARBLER continued at San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary in Irvine through March 24. It has been typically seen in Pond D. 


LOCAL EVENTS

ORANGE COUNTY SPRING COUNT 2019

What is the OCSC?

The OCSC (Orange County Spring Count) is part of a nationwide migration count, similar to a Christmas Bird Count, but timed to the opposite half of the migration cycle. Again this year the OCSC is being expanded to try to capture more of the birds that migrate through the county. Sea and Sage is encouraging birders to participate anytime during the months of April and May. This will allow us to see and count more of the species that migrate through the county. Again, this year we will try to focus on the best areas for birds since comprehensive coverage of the entire county is not a realistic goal.

How you can participate:

One of the objectives of Environment for the Americas (the sponsor of the hemisphere wide count) is to enter all of the data into eBird. This means that it is very simple to participate.

All of the regularly scheduled bird counts in April and May will be included in the OCSC. The dates do not need to change.

I will also include the checklists from all of the Sea and Sage field trips in Orange County held during April and May.

Many of you already use eBird. You can enter your Spring Count data directly into eBird for any birding that you do during April and May. You don’t have to send tally sheets to anyone. All that is needed is to share the eBird check list with the Sea and Sage Audubon eBird account. (The eBird user name is sea_sage_aud).

If you don’t currently use eBird, you can sign up. It’s free! www.ebird.org

A goal for the OCSC is to count all the “Top 100 Hot Spots” shown in eBird. It does not matter how many times a particular spot is covered. Users of the eBird data can sort that out.


UPCOMING EVENTS THAT DO NOT REQUIRE ADVANCE RESERVATIONS

The monthly Nature Walk at San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary will take place on April 6 from 9:00am to 10:30am. Meet at the Audubon House. 

The monthly Bird Walk at San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary will take place on April 14 from 8:00am to 12:00pm. Meet at the Audubon House. For a livelier trip, ask trip leader Jeff if there are any Yellow-headed Parrots at Irvine Regional Park.


UPCOMING EVENTS THAT REQUIRE ADVANCE RESERVATIONS

There is still room on the April 12th Owl Prowl at Audubon Starr Ranch Sanctuary. Email Nancy Kenyon at nancykenyon@....

The next amazing Sea and Sage Spring Pelagic trip will take place on Saturday, May 4.  Spots are still available! If you’re interested, please e-mail Nancy Kenyon: nancykenyon@...


WORKSHOPS AND CLASSES

None taking place.

*****************************************************

The Orange County RBA and events summary is produced weekly by Ryan Winkleman and Jeff Bray in collaboration with Doug Willick. Sightings of rare birds can be posted to the OrangeCountyBirding listserv, emailed directly to Jeff Bray (jbray4913@...) and/or Ryan Winkleman (rswinkleman@...), and/or submitted to eBird (http://ebird.org/content/ebird). Any supporting details (descriptions, photos, audio recordings, etc.) of rare sightings that are not already disclosed on the listserv or on eBird should also be emailed to Ryan Winkleman separately for consideration to be mentioned in the current quarterly report for North American Birds.

Those sightings that are included in this summary generally include those that are considered rare (regionally or seasonally) for Orange County based on "The Birds of Orange County: Status and Distribution" (Hamilton and Willick), "Birds of Southern California" (Garrett and Dunn), and/or more contemporary changes in local or regional status and distribution. Rarities that regularly or seasonally occur at a particular location, such as annually wintering rarities on Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge, may not be included in this digest, but reports of these same species occurring at other, atypical locations throughout the county may be included. We don't include hybrids, subspecies, introduced or exotic birds, or in most cases and for no real reason, geese. All bird reports are vetted to the extent possible prior to each publication, but in the interest of sharing information, the accuracy of any given report cannot always be guaranteed, nor can the presence of any given bird for those who choose to chase after them.

Information on upcoming local events is taken largely from the Sea and Sage Audubon website (http://www.seaandsageaudubon.org/). Sea and Sage Audubon is based out of the Audubon House at the San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary in Irvine. They sponsor a number of public field trips, special birding events, conservation lectures, and social gatherings throughout the year. Information regarding upcoming local events should be considered accurate at the time of this posting. However, for the most current information please refer to the field trip list on the Sea and Sage Audubon website at http://www.seaandsageaudubon.org/FieldTrips/FieldTripSchedule.html. It is also recommended that you refer to that website immediately prior to engaging in any field trip to confirm that trips are still occurring. If you know of additional upcoming events that are not sponsored directly by Sea and Sage Audubon, please email Ryan Winkleman and/or Jeff Bray for inclusion. #RBA

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Jeff Bray
Irvine, CA

Dana Point Harbor

Sachi Fukuman
 

While kayaking, we saw about 10-20 Black-vented Shearwaters bobbing around about 1/2 mile from the harbor. 
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Sachi Fukuman
San Clemente

Lesser Nighthawks and Common Poorwill

Trish G
 

This evening at Irvine Regional Park, 2 Lesser Nighthawks were seen flying over the east end of the park over the creek. They showed up just a bit past sundown. It was too dark for any photos, but birds were well seen with their white wing patches, and floating like giant butterflies.
At least 2 Common Poorwill were also heard along with the lovely serenade of a Coyote howling.
I later had 2 Barn Owls kleaking, heard at least 2 Western Screen Owl, and heard a very distant Great Horned Owl hooting from across the creekbed.

Happy night birding - Trish Gussler, Anaheim



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Trish Gussler, Anaheim
https://www.flickr.com/photos/trishrg/