Date   
Re: Tagged White pelican

Craig Hoover
 

The plan for Idaho's management of pelicans is open for comment it seems:

I worked for the agency in 1978 for two years looking at the possibility of special regulations for the fishery on the reservoir and river.  Looks like pelicans were a recent addition to the problem of what to do with the fish.  I remember tons of Utah chubs, suckers and carp in our trap at the mouth of the reservoir.  The agency sees these as making up 90 percent of the diet of pelicans in the area of the Blackfoot Reservoir.  The management plan is interesting reading.  I worked at a hatchery in that state too, feeding fish by hand. So seeing all that work get consumed by a bunch of birds instead of little kids and families out for  fishing trip conflicts me.

Craig Hoover
Costa Mesa CA

On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 10:37 AM James Pike <jimpike444@...> wrote:
Hi Debbie,

The tags appear to be related to a long-term study being conducted at two breeding colonies by the Idaho Dept of Fish and Game. White Pelicans that had experienced increasing breeding success at those two colonies were beginning to have an impact on native trout numbers and those of other game fish that are especially prized by recreational fishermen in Idaho. As a consequence, management efforts were initiated that include hazing, egg and nest destruction, and depredation, along with a banding study to determine the overall effects of these actions. While I found it interesting to discover just how many pelicans were wintering in the region, learning the story behind the study sapped my interest in any further reporting of band numbers.

Jim Pike
HB    

On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 9:46 AM Debbie Hanson <alan_hanson@...> wrote:
Sorry.Emoji Here is the link to my flickr photo of the tagged pelican. 


Debbie Hanson
Yorba Linda



--
Craig Hoover
Costa Mesa, CA

Two Loon day at Bolsa Chica

dave_telford
 

Today my wife and I birded Bolsa Chica. We had a Common Loon across the wooden foot bridge about 100 yards down the trail. There was a Red-throated Loon in the Wintersburg Channel. Other birds of note a Loggerhead Shrike at the far end of the Pocket Pond. A Merlin in a tree (close to where the Osprey hangs out) on the trail side of the Pocket Pond. On the way back to the parking lot we stopped at the view point just before the wooden foot bridge there was Bonaparte's Gull on the sandbar.


Dave Telford
Huntington Beach

Re: Tagged White pelican

Gjon Hazard
 

Jim:

While I can relate to your sapped enthusiasm for reporting, consider the alternative. When the time comes, the decision maker will be making a decision regardless of whether he or she has data. By suppressing information, will that decision be better or worse? Who can say? Whether a given decision is "good or bad" will always be in the eye of the beholder, but it seems to me, an *informed* decision will, in such circumstances, always be preferable to an uninformed decision. 

[And I say that fully aware of -- and, alas, all the more frustrated by -- our other recent communication.]

-Gjon


On Mar 4, 2019, at 10:37 AM, James Pike <jimpike444@...> wrote:

Hi Debbie,

The tags appear to be related to a long-term study being conducted at two breeding colonies by the Idaho Dept of Fish and Game. White Pelicans that had experienced increasing breeding success at those two colonies were beginning to have an impact on native trout numbers and those of other game fish that are especially prized by recreational fishermen in Idaho. As a consequence, management efforts were initiated that include hazing, egg and nest destruction, and depredation, along with a banding study to determine the overall effects of these actions. While I found it interesting to discover just how many pelicans were wintering in the region, learning the story behind the study sapped my interest in any further reporting of band numbers.

Jim Pike
HB    

On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 9:46 AM Debbie Hanson <alan_hanson@...> wrote:
Sorry.Emoji Here is the link to my flickr photo of the tagged pelican. 


Debbie Hanson
Yorba Linda

Re: Tagged White pelican

Linette Davenport
 

I didn’t check to see if the American White Pelican has any particular status in Idaho, but it is considered a Species of Special Concern by the State of California, so it is certainly worth reporting tagged individuals from Idaho when they are in California, since they are protected here. Any negative impacts to their populations while they are in other places would definitely be of interest to wildlife management at our state level and also the federal level.

 

Linette Davenport

Orange, CA

 

From: OrangeCountyBirding@groups.io <OrangeCountyBirding@groups.io> On Behalf Of Gjon Hazard
Sent: Monday, March 4, 2019 8:28 PM
To: James Pike <jimpike444@...>
Cc: Orangecountybirding <orangecountybirding@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OrangeCountyBirding] Tagged White pelican

 

Jim:

 

While I can relate to your sapped enthusiasm for reporting, consider the alternative. When the time comes, the decision maker will be making a decision regardless of whether he or she has data. By suppressing information, will that decision be better or worse? Who can say? Whether a given decision is "good or bad" will always be in the eye of the beholder, but it seems to me, an *informed* decision will, in such circumstances, always be preferable to an uninformed decision. 

 

[And I say that fully aware of -- and, alas, all the more frustrated by -- our other recent communication.]


-Gjon

 


On Mar 4, 2019, at 10:37 AM, James Pike <jimpike444@...> wrote:

Hi Debbie,

 

The tags appear to be related to a long-term study being conducted at two breeding colonies by the Idaho Dept of Fish and Game. White Pelicans that had experienced increasing breeding success at those two colonies were beginning to have an impact on native trout numbers and those of other game fish that are especially prized by recreational fishermen in Idaho. As a consequence, management efforts were initiated that include hazing, egg and nest destruction, and depredation, along with a banding study to determine the overall effects of these actions. While I found it interesting to discover just how many pelicans were wintering in the region, learning the story behind the study sapped my interest in any further reporting of band numbers.

 

Jim Pike

HB    

 

On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 9:46 AM Debbie Hanson <alan_hanson@...> wrote:

Sorry.Emoji Here is the link to my flickr photo of the tagged pelican. 

 

 

Debbie Hanson

Yorba Linda


--
Linette Davenport
Orange, CA

Continuing Bald Eagle in Newport Back Bay

Lam-Son Vinh
 

Standing on the observation deck of the Muth Building of Upper Newport Bay Nature Preserve and looking South, I saw and
photographed Kanoa, the male Bald Eagle from Santa Rosa Island. He was about a quarter mile away, but the wing tag with number 96 was readable.
He successfully captured a coot despite being harassed by a couple of gulls.  Here's the link to the photos:  https://photos.app.goo.gl/AuDeyW5TW9osNkUv9
--
Lam-Son Vinh
Huntington Beach, CA

Re: Tagged White pelican

Debbie Hanson
 

Good morning,

Thank you all for your responses on the tagged pelican.  Definite food for thought in the answers.

All the best,
Debbie Hanson
Yorba Linda

Re: Tagged White pelican

James Pike
 

Hi Gjon, 

Where we differ is that you want Idaho authorities to make the best-informed decision possible when determining the optimal number of eggs to destroy and adult pelicans to kill, whereas I want them to make an entirely *different* decision, one that doesn’t involve either of those options. You evidently can reconcile assisting them in their efforts, while I can’t. A similar banding study involving Double-crested Cormorants being conducted on Sand Island at the mouth of the Columbia River employs similar methods in hopes of achieving similar aims as those in Idaho. After researching this project online, I contributed money to the Audubon Society of Portland to assist their lawsuit seeking to halt the project rather than choosing to contribute cormorant band-numbers to assist the project itself. The bottom line is that birders deserve to know why they are encountering bands on these fish-eating species and how the data they contribute might be used in service of these studies. Maybe they’ll conclude that the ends justify the means, or maybe they won’t. 

Jim Pike

HB 


On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 8:27 PM Gjon Hazard <gjon_hazard@...> wrote:
Jim:

While I can relate to your sapped enthusiasm for reporting, consider the alternative. When the time comes, the decision maker will be making a decision regardless of whether he or she has data. By suppressing information, will that decision be better or worse? Who can say? Whether a given decision is "good or bad" will always be in the eye of the beholder, but it seems to me, an *informed* decision will, in such circumstances, always be preferable to an uninformed decision. 

[And I say that fully aware of -- and, alas, all the more frustrated by -- our other recent communication.]

-Gjon


On Mar 4, 2019, at 10:37 AM, James Pike <jimpike444@...> wrote:

Hi Debbie,

The tags appear to be related to a long-term study being conducted at two breeding colonies by the Idaho Dept of Fish and Game. White Pelicans that had experienced increasing breeding success at those two colonies were beginning to have an impact on native trout numbers and those of other game fish that are especially prized by recreational fishermen in Idaho. As a consequence, management efforts were initiated that include hazing, egg and nest destruction, and depredation, along with a banding study to determine the overall effects of these actions. While I found it interesting to discover just how many pelicans were wintering in the region, learning the story behind the study sapped my interest in any further reporting of band numbers.

Jim Pike
HB    

On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 9:46 AM Debbie Hanson <alan_hanson@...> wrote:
Sorry.Emoji Here is the link to my flickr photo of the tagged pelican. 


Debbie Hanson
Yorba Linda

Re: Tagged White pelican

Linette Davenport
 

They wouldn’t need bird tags to determine the “optimal number of eggs to destroy and adult pelicans to kill” – they would simply have to count the numbers of pelicans feeding at these reservoirs to get that number. If anything, tracking the tagged adults provides evidence to argue *against* the practice. For example: stop killing these pelicans, because they are known to winter in the state of California, where their population numbers are such that the State has designated them as a Species of Species Concern. Evidence? Reports of tagged individuals in CA.

 

Also, tracking the tagged individuals gives information on if those pelicans even return to the breeding sites. If they get attacked and hazed so much from those colonies in Idaho that they decide to start breeding somewhere else, that might give Idaho Fish & Game reason to focus more on hazing than on destroying eggs, or it might make them decide to ease up on the program. Or they may find out that those tagged pelicans from the Idaho breeding colonies aren’t even the ones that are feeding on the fish – those birds might head further south after breeding, and the offending pelicans might be from Canada. The scenarios are many, and reporting data helps figure that out.

 

Thank you for letting us know about this situation, Jim! And airing your concerns helped start a (hopefully) constructive and educational conversation on the value of data.

 

Linette Davenport

Orange, CA

 

From: OrangeCountyBirding@groups.io <OrangeCountyBirding@groups.io> On Behalf Of James Pike
Sent: Tuesday, March 5, 2019 9:40 AM
To: Gjon Hazard <gjon_hazard@...>
Cc: Orangecountybirding <orangecountybirding@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OrangeCountyBirding] Tagged White pelican

 

Hi Gjon, 

Where we differ is that you want Idaho authorities to make the best-informed decision possible when determining the optimal number of eggs to destroy and adult pelicans to kill, whereas I want them to make an entirely *different* decision, one that doesn’t involve either of those options. You evidently can reconcile assisting them in their efforts, while I can’t. A similar banding study involving Double-crested Cormorants being conducted on Sand Island at the mouth of the Columbia River employs similar methods in hopes of achieving similar aims as those in Idaho. After researching this project online, I contributed money to the Audubon Society of Portland to assist their lawsuit seeking to halt the project rather than choosing to contribute cormorant band-numbers to assist the project itself. The bottom line is that birders deserve to know why they are encountering bands on these fish-eating species and how the data they contribute might be used in service of these studies. Maybe they’ll conclude that the ends justify the means, or maybe they won’t. 

Jim Pike

HB 

 

On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 8:27 PM Gjon Hazard <gjon_hazard@...> wrote:

Jim:

 

While I can relate to your sapped enthusiasm for reporting, consider the alternative. When the time comes, the decision maker will be making a decision regardless of whether he or she has data. By suppressing information, will that decision be better or worse? Who can say? Whether a given decision is "good or bad" will always be in the eye of the beholder, but it seems to me, an *informed* decision will, in such circumstances, always be preferable to an uninformed decision. 

 

[And I say that fully aware of -- and, alas, all the more frustrated by -- our other recent communication.]


-Gjon

 


On Mar 4, 2019, at 10:37 AM, James Pike <jimpike444@...> wrote:

Hi Debbie,

 

The tags appear to be related to a long-term study being conducted at two breeding colonies by the Idaho Dept of Fish and Game. White Pelicans that had experienced increasing breeding success at those two colonies were beginning to have an impact on native trout numbers and those of other game fish that are especially prized by recreational fishermen in Idaho. As a consequence, management efforts were initiated that include hazing, egg and nest destruction, and depredation, along with a banding study to determine the overall effects of these actions. While I found it interesting to discover just how many pelicans were wintering in the region, learning the story behind the study sapped my interest in any further reporting of band numbers.

 

Jim Pike

HB    

 

On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 9:46 AM Debbie Hanson <alan_hanson@...> wrote:

Sorry.Emoji Here is the link to my flickr photo of the tagged pelican. 

 

 

Debbie Hanson

Yorba Linda


--
Linette Davenport
Orange, CA

Re: Tagged White pelican

Craig Hoover
 

The Pacific Flyway Council site is here:


They have posted abstracts on several migratory species.  All the states I think are beheld to this group in how they manage these birds.  More interesting reading for those interested.  I haven't read any of it yet!  But I will and I hope others will too.

Craig Hoover
Costa Mesa, CA

On Tue, Mar 5, 2019 at 10:19 AM Linette Davenport <littlewing250@...> wrote:

They wouldn’t need bird tags to determine the “optimal number of eggs to destroy and adult pelicans to kill” – they would simply have to count the numbers of pelicans feeding at these reservoirs to get that number. If anything, tracking the tagged adults provides evidence to argue *against* the practice. For example: stop killing these pelicans, because they are known to winter in the state of California, where their population numbers are such that the State has designated them as a Species of Species Concern. Evidence? Reports of tagged individuals in CA.

 

Also, tracking the tagged individuals gives information on if those pelicans even return to the breeding sites. If they get attacked and hazed so much from those colonies in Idaho that they decide to start breeding somewhere else, that might give Idaho Fish & Game reason to focus more on hazing than on destroying eggs, or it might make them decide to ease up on the program. Or they may find out that those tagged pelicans from the Idaho breeding colonies aren’t even the ones that are feeding on the fish – those birds might head further south after breeding, and the offending pelicans might be from Canada. The scenarios are many, and reporting data helps figure that out.

 

Thank you for letting us know about this situation, Jim! And airing your concerns helped start a (hopefully) constructive and educational conversation on the value of data.

 

Linette Davenport

Orange, CA

 

From: OrangeCountyBirding@groups.io <OrangeCountyBirding@groups.io> On Behalf Of James Pike
Sent: Tuesday, March 5, 2019 9:40 AM
To: Gjon Hazard <gjon_hazard@...>
Cc: Orangecountybirding <orangecountybirding@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OrangeCountyBirding] Tagged White pelican

 

Hi Gjon, 

Where we differ is that you want Idaho authorities to make the best-informed decision possible when determining the optimal number of eggs to destroy and adult pelicans to kill, whereas I want them to make an entirely *different* decision, one that doesn’t involve either of those options. You evidently can reconcile assisting them in their efforts, while I can’t. A similar banding study involving Double-crested Cormorants being conducted on Sand Island at the mouth of the Columbia River employs similar methods in hopes of achieving similar aims as those in Idaho. After researching this project online, I contributed money to the Audubon Society of Portland to assist their lawsuit seeking to halt the project rather than choosing to contribute cormorant band-numbers to assist the project itself. The bottom line is that birders deserve to know why they are encountering bands on these fish-eating species and how the data they contribute might be used in service of these studies. Maybe they’ll conclude that the ends justify the means, or maybe they won’t. 

Jim Pike

HB 

 

On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 8:27 PM Gjon Hazard <gjon_hazard@...> wrote:

Jim:

 

While I can relate to your sapped enthusiasm for reporting, consider the alternative. When the time comes, the decision maker will be making a decision regardless of whether he or she has data. By suppressing information, will that decision be better or worse? Who can say? Whether a given decision is "good or bad" will always be in the eye of the beholder, but it seems to me, an *informed* decision will, in such circumstances, always be preferable to an uninformed decision. 

 

[And I say that fully aware of -- and, alas, all the more frustrated by -- our other recent communication.]


-Gjon

 


On Mar 4, 2019, at 10:37 AM, James Pike <jimpike444@...> wrote:

Hi Debbie,

 

The tags appear to be related to a long-term study being conducted at two breeding colonies by the Idaho Dept of Fish and Game. White Pelicans that had experienced increasing breeding success at those two colonies were beginning to have an impact on native trout numbers and those of other game fish that are especially prized by recreational fishermen in Idaho. As a consequence, management efforts were initiated that include hazing, egg and nest destruction, and depredation, along with a banding study to determine the overall effects of these actions. While I found it interesting to discover just how many pelicans were wintering in the region, learning the story behind the study sapped my interest in any further reporting of band numbers.

 

Jim Pike

HB    

 

On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 9:46 AM Debbie Hanson <alan_hanson@...> wrote:

Sorry.Emoji Here is the link to my flickr photo of the tagged pelican. 

 

 

Debbie Hanson

Yorba Linda


--
Linette Davenport
Orange, CA



--
Craig Hoover
Costa Mesa, CA

Bullock's Oriole in HCP-EAST

Lam-Son Vinh
 

There's a Bullock's Oriole eating cherry blossoms behind the library in Huntington Central Park.
Pics later
--
Lam-Son Vinh
Huntington Beach, CA

Re: Bullock's Oriole in HCP-EAST

Lam-Son Vinh
 

Here are some photos of the Bullock's Oriole: https://photos.app.goo.gl/X1crWFrkFNEMS2Gw9
--
Lam-Son Vinh
Huntington Beach, CA

Re: Bullock's Oriole in HCP-EAST

Edana Salisbury
 

The oriole was in the cherry trees along the walkway and east of the south end of the secret garden at 0800 this morning.  

Edana Salisbury 
Buena Park 
and possibly autocorrected incorrectly ....

On Mar 6, 2019, at 2:34 PM, Lam-Son Vinh via Groups.Io <lamson.vinh@...> wrote:

There's a Bullock's Oriole eating cherry blossoms behind the library in Huntington Central Park.
Pics later
--
Lam-Son Vinh
Huntington Beach, CA

--
Edana Salisbury
Buena Park

Orange County RBA: March 7, 2019

Jeff Bray
 

RBA

 

* California

* Orange County

* March 7, 2019

* CAOC19.03.07

 

This is the Orange County, CA weekly Rare Bird Alert (RBA) and local events summary. California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) review species are capitalized and marked with asterisks below. All documentation of review species should be forwarded to the CBRC secretary, Tom Benson, at secretary@....

 

BIRDS MENTIONED

 

Laughing Gull

Mew Gull

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron

Bald Eagle

Gray Flycatcher

Plumbeous Vireo

Purple Finch

White-throated Sparrow

Black-and-white Warbler

American Redstart

Palm Warbler

 

A first-cycle LAUGHING GULL that was found on January 23 at North Lake in Irvine continued through March 6. The bird is typically found in the southern half of the lake, often close to Barranca, where it basically just sits around all day eating food that people throw to it. Easy parking is in the lot off of Barranca and Lake.

 

A first-cycle MEW GULL continued at Mile Square Regional Park in Fountain Valley through March 1.

 

Two YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS were seen at Dana Point Harbor in Dana Point on March 2. They were seen near the Nordhavn building.

 

An adult BALD EAGLE has been hanging around Upper Newport Bay in Newport Beach since February 8 and was last seen on March 5. This bird, which is tagged A-96, is named Kanoa and HATCHED on Santa Rosa Island in 2014.

 

A GRAY FLYCATCHER continued at Mile Square Regional Park in Fountain Valley through March 4 near the northern entrance off Edinger along the golf course fence line. It dips its tail down.

 

A PLUMBEOUS VIREO was found at Pearson Park in Anaheim on March 4. It was seen again on March 5 around Tennis Court 4, bouncing around the trees.

 

As many as 4 PURPLE FINCHES were reported to be continuing at the Shipley Nature Center at Huntington Central Park in Huntington Beach through March 5.

 

A WHITE-THROATED SPARROW continued at Irvine Regional Park in Orange through March 1, where it has been seen in the area between the stables and the maintenance yard.

 

Four BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLERS were seen this week in the county. One at Aurora Park in Mission Viejo on February 28. One at Pearson Park in Anaheim on March 4, one at Laguna Niguel Regional Park in Laguna Niguel on March 4 and another at Huntington Central Park in Huntington Beach on March 4.

 

An AMERICAN REDSTART was found at a private residence in Huntington Beach on March 2 and was seen again on March 4.

 

A PALM WARBLER continued at San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary in Irvine through March 5, where it is typically seen in Pond D, where no palms are present and where they should be called Dirt Warblers.

 


LOCAL EVENTS

 

UPCOMING EVENTS THAT DO NOT REQUIRE ADVANCE RESERVATIONS

 

The monthly Bird Walk at San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary will take place on March 10 from 8:00am to 12:00pm. Meet at the Audubon House.  

 

The Bolsa Chica Bird Walk at Bolsa Chica Wetlands will take place on March 21 from 8:00am to 12:00pm. Meet at Harriet Wieder Park playground area.

 

 

UPCOMING EVENTS THAT REQUIRE ADVANCE RESERVATIONS

 

The Big Morongo Preserve field trip will take place on April 27. More details can be found here: http://www.seaandsageaudubon.org/FieldTrips/Trips/MorongoPreserve.html

 

 

WORKSHOPS AND CLASSES

 

Two bird banding workshops will be held at Audubon Starr Ranch Sanctuary in Trabuco Canyon in March 2019. The beginning workshop will be held on March 9 and 10 from 7:30am to 3:30pm, and the advanced workshop will be held during the same hours on March 16 and 17. For more details or to enroll, email seasonal ornithologist Robert Snowden at rsnowden@....

 

 

*****************************************************

 

The Orange County RBA and events summary is produced weekly by Ryan Winkleman and Jeff Bray in collaboration with Doug Willick. Sightings of rare birds can be posted to the OrangeCountyBirding listserv, emailed directly to Jeff Bray (jbray4913@...) and/or Ryan Winkleman (rswinkleman@...), and/or submitted to eBird (http://ebird.org/content/ebird). Any supporting details (descriptions, photos, audio recordings, etc.) of rare sightings that are not already disclosed on the listserv or on eBird should also be emailed to Ryan Winkleman separately for consideration to be mentioned in the current quarterly report for North American Birds.

 

Those sightings that are included in this summary generally include those that are considered rare (regionally or seasonally) for Orange County based on "The Birds of Orange County: Status and Distribution" (Hamilton and Willick), "Birds of Southern California" (Garrett and Dunn), and/or more contemporary changes in local or regional status and distribution. Rarities that regularly or seasonally occur at a particular location, such as annually wintering rarities on Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge, may not be included in this digest, but reports of these same species occurring at other, atypical locations throughout the county may be included. All bird reports are vetted to the extent possible prior to each publication, but in the interest of sharing information, the accuracy of any given report cannot always be guaranteed, nor can the presence of any given bird for those who choose to chase after them.

 

Information on upcoming local events is taken largely from the Sea and Sage Audubon website (http://www.seaandsageaudubon.org/). Sea and Sage Audubon is based out of the Audubon House at the San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary in Irvine. They sponsor a number of public field trips, special birding events, conservation lectures, and social gatherings throughout the year. Information regarding upcoming local events should be considered accurate at the time of this posting. However, for the most current information please refer to the field trip list on the Sea and Sage Audubon website at http://www.seaandsageaudubon.org/FieldTrips/FieldTripSchedule.html. It is also recommended that you refer to that website immediately prior to engaging in any field trip to confirm that trips are still occurring. If you know of additional upcoming events that are not sponsored directly by Sea and Sage Audubon, please email Ryan Winkleman and/or Jeff Bray for inclusion. #RBA


--
Jeff Bray
Irvine, CA

A few very belated highlights from Monday (3/4/19)

Doug Willick
 

On Monday, I met Shawn Nielsen to do a little birding (and get some exercise) at Pearson Park.  Highlights included the continuing adult male Eurasian Wigeon (at least its second year wintering here), a Plumbeous Vireo, and a Black-and-white Warbler.  There has also been a male Ring-necked Duck in the shallow ponds along the north side, where the wigeon hang out; and for those keeping a serious Pearson Park list is a must-see (not your typical habitat for a RNDU, even though they do sometimes show up in shallow water habitats such as at Pearson, as well as deep water where they are much more likely).  "Eagle eye Nielsen" picked out both the vireo and the warbler (as well as a Black-throated Gray Warbler that I never did see). The Plumbeous Vireo was in the southwestern "quadrant" of the park, moving around between a few different trees (originally pishing into a smallish juniper type tree, appropriately enough).  The Black-and-white Warbler (appeared to be a young male type) was high in the grove of tall Ficus trees, along the western side of the park (which is Harbor Blvd.), about 100-150' in from the street.  This bird was with a very active flock of warblers (mostly Yellow-rumps of course, but at least one Orange-crown, one Townsend's and one Black-throated Gray), and a Ruby-crowned Kinglet or two. At this date these birds have presumably been wintering here, and should be still around for awhile. The following ebird checklist includes some pics of the above mentioned birds:  https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53398661

In the late afternoon, I made a brief stop at Burris Basin (and Anaheim Coves Park).  Not too much in the way of highlights, except for an adult Bald Eagle.  The eagle was initially sitting on top of a power pole along the Santa Ana River bike trail; and then later the bird flew over into Burris Basin, and landed in the shallow water along the eastern shoreline.  After drinking for awhile, it took off and flew out of sight to the south. 
--
Doug Willick
Orange, CA

Highlights of March 8 Bolsa Chica Monthly Count

Terry Hill
 

We experienced cold temperatures and strong winds for our Bolsa Chica monthly count today (March 8), causing white caps in the tidal basin.  Our highlights included: 159 Brants (probably undercounted, as there were a lot a good distance away), 30 Canada Goose (including two pairs nesting on Nest Site 1 in the vegetation, 8 on North Tern Island, and at least 2 pair in the pickleweed), 1 Greater Scaup, 1 Herring Gull, 3 Common Loons, only 1 Reddish Egret, 1 Bewick’s Wren, 2 Burrowing Owls, and a CALIFORNIA SCRUB-JAY in the palms above the tide gates.  
--
Terry Hill
Huntington Beach

Highlights from the monthly San Joaquin Marsh Walk - 10 March

Jeff Bray
 

We had about 28 people show up this morning for the monthly walk. Weather was cool and cloudy. We saw/heard 63 species. Most notable highlight was was seeing a Merlin snatch a Barn Swallow out of the air on Pond 1. Palm Warbler was NOT seen by our group, despite looking for it. There was one Ring-necked Duck on Pond 2. A White-tailed Kite was behind Pond 2. 

Thanks to all who came. 

Checklist below of all birds that were seen:

Cheers! 

--
Jeff Bray
Irvine, CA

Immature Bald Eagle in Newport Back Bay

Lam-Son Vinh
 

Shortly after 1 pm today, I observed an immature Bald Eagle being harassed by an Osprey in Newport Back Bay, one mile East of the Muth Interpretive Building.
I'm not 100% confident with the ID (hoping for a Golden Eagle), so please confirm with the help of some blurry photos included here:  https://photos.app.goo.gl/ZDsGfhRWHatJpTXK7
--
Lam-Son Vinh
Huntington Beach, CA

Summer Tanager

Jim Elias
 

Just cannot get enough of the vibrant red colors of the male Summer Tanager. Ryan shared some great info with me regarding the fact that this bird has been wintering here for the past four years.
Location is the far west end of Mason Regional Park; Irvine. Originally found by Rhonda L. Howard. There is a chance it will pose nicely for you, if you have a chance to visit the park.
My photo dated March 10 can be found here:


----

Jim Elias
Dana Point

locked >>>THREAD CLOSED<<< Painted Lady butterfly migration

Alex Tolkachev
 

I have been watching thousand of butterflies flying through Aliso Viejo in roughly North-Westerly direction today. Turns out they are Painted Lady, smaller cousin of Monarch, and there has been a news story on them. A “billion” butterflies are expected to migrate through SoCal on the way from Mexico to their breeding areas in Oregon.

I wonder which birds and at what hotspots are getting excited about this. Not that I don’t wish the butterflies a safe journey en masse, but it would be nice to see and photograph a frenzied hunt. 

--
Alex Tolkachev, Irvine

locked Re: >>>THREAD CLOSED<<< Painted Lady butterfly migration

Pete Gordon
 

They are everywhere.  Foothill Ranch and Lake Forest  this morning


From: OrangeCountyBirding@groups.io <OrangeCountyBirding@groups.io> on behalf of Alex Tolkachev <atolkachev@...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 12, 2019 12:27:07 PM
To: Orangecountybirding
Subject: [OrangeCountyBirding] Painted Lady butterfly migration
 
I have been watching thousand of butterflies flying through Aliso Viejo in roughly North-Westerly direction today. Turns out they are Painted Lady, smaller cousin of Monarch, and there has been a news story on them. A “billion” butterflies are expected to migrate through SoCal on the way from Mexico to their breeding areas in Oregon.

I wonder which birds and at what hotspots are getting excited about this. Not that I don’t wish the butterflies a safe journey en masse, but it would be nice to see and photograph a frenzied hunt. 

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Alex Tolkachev, Irvine

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Pete Gordon
Foothill Ranch, CA