Date   
Re: An OC migration calendar?

too fly
 

I’m actually working on a video series for something very similar to this! I’m starting in San Diego but expanding shortly there after. If anyone is interested in helping out, and doesn’t mind being on video...let me know! You qualify if: you are a top 10 birder at one of the top 10 eBird hot spots in Orange County, San Diego county, Los Angles County and Imperial Valley (This is just to start). I will consider the top 20 hotspots also.

Let me know! Shoot me an email.

Anthony “TooFly” Fife
La Mesa, Ca

Tooflyanthony@...

Re: An OC migration calendar?

tgmiko@gmail.com
 

If you get a chance, tool around under "Explore" on eBird. It takes some clicking around, but you can select or narrow down what data you want to see. You can ask it to give you abundance bar graphs for all of the birds that occur in an area e.g. Orange County (or Los Angeles+ Orange+San Diego Counties). You can then use that data, combined with what birds you want to see to figure out where to be, on what dates. It's no guarantee, but your success rate will be very high.
Tom Miko Claremont LA County
909.241.3300

On Thu, Feb 21, 2019, 12:17 PM Jim Elias via Groups.Io <jeli64=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
That's a terrific idea Alex! Thank you for representing us newbees! 
For new birders or birder "enthusiasts," we often get lost in the world of acronyms and abbreviations for geographical locations.

Thank you,
Jim Elias
Dana Point

On Thursday, February 21, 2019, 9:53:12 AM PST, Alex Tolkachev <atolkachev@...> wrote:


Would someone be able to write (or unearth) an article on getting the most out of the migration season(s) for new birders?

Things like must-see hotspots (I am guessing Upper Newport Bay will make the list, but perhaps every busy local hotspot will get its share of migrants), species to look for and expected times when they will be here -- to plan which to see first and which to save for later.

Also any tips on using existing resources, such as eBird or any blogs or sites that are active and dedicated to watching migrations in OC.

Thank you!
--
Alex Tolkachev, Irvine

rock wrens

James Pike
 

Two Rock Wrens were calling on opposite sides of the Santa Ana River just north of the pedestrian bridge adjacent to LeBard Park today. The species has bred along this stretch of river at least once in the past. On the 16th, a female Common Goldeneye was in the river between Hamilton and PCH. Unfortunately, the Osprey nest near PCH wasn't seasonally active for the first time in recent memory.

Jim Pike
HB 

Ovenbird continues at Goldenwest Community College

Liga Auzins
 

Birders,

The Ovenbird found by Brian Daniels a couple months back is still present. This morning, Feb 24, it offered relatively easy viewing as it worked the length of the south slope of the Amplitheater on the Golden West College campus.

Short-eared Owl in Fairview Park 02/24/2019

Lam-Son Vinh
 

A Short-eared Owl appeared briefly after sunset near the model aircraft runway in Fairview Park.
Some photos taken in the dark:  https://photos.app.goo.gl/Sca7dw7fUaWMJ7aCA
--
Lam-Son Vinh
Huntington Beach, CA

Orange County RBA: February 28, 2019

Ryan Winkleman
 

RBA

 

* California

* Orange County

* February 28, 2019

* CAOC19.02.28

 

This is the Orange County, CA weekly Rare Bird Alert (RBA) and local events summary. California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) review species are capitalized and marked with asterisks below. All documentation of review species should be forwarded to the CBRC secretary, Tom Benson, at secretary@....

 

BIRDS MENTIONED

 

Common Goldeneye

Laughing Gull

Mew Gull

Zone-tailed Hawk

Short-eared Owl

Gray Flycatcher

Cassin's Vireo

Purple Finch

Green-tailed Towhee

White-throated Sparrow

Ovenbird

Palm Warbler

 

A young male COMMON GOLDENEYE that was found at Lincoln Basin (upstream of Burris) in Anaheim on January 27 continued through February 23.

 

A first-cycle LAUGHING GULL that was found on January 23 at North Lake in Irvine continued through February 27. The bird is typically found in the southern half of the lake, often close to Barranca, where it basically just sits around all day eating food that people throw to it. Easy parking is in the lot off of Barranca and Lake.

 

A first-cycle MEW GULL continued at Mile Square Regional Park in Fountain Valley through February 22.


The adult Zone-tailed Hawk continued in Rancho Santa Margarita on February 27, where it was spotted shopping for cars from above over the Santa Margarita Ford dealership.


A SHORT-EARED OWL was photographed at Fairview Park in Costa Mesa on February 24. The bird appeared in the model airplane runway area at dusk.

 

A GRAY FLYCATCHER continued at Mile Square Regional Park in Fountain Valley through February 24 near the northern entrance off Edinger along the golf course fence line. It dips its tail down.


A CASSIN'S VIREO was reported at Disneyland on February 21. No clue where it was, but the park is small enough that it should be super easy to find and confirm! At least the observer said he did have binoculars on him...

 

As many as 6 PURPLE FINCHES were reported to be continuing at the Shipley Nature Center at Huntington Central Park in Huntington Beach through February 26.


A GREEN-TAILED TOWHEE was reported to continue at Harriett Wieder Regional Park in Huntington Beach on February 26. 

 

A WHITE-THROATED SPARROW continued at the Shipley Nature Center at Huntington Central Park in Huntington Beach on February 22, and another "cont bird" was at Irvine Regional Park in Orange through February 26, where it has been seen in the area between the stables and the maintenance yard. 


An OVENBIRD continued at the amphitheater at Golden West College in Huntington Beach on February 24.

 

Up to two PALM WARBLERS continued at San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary in Irvine through February 27, where they are typically seen in Pond D, where no palms are present and where they should be called Dirt Warblers.

 

 

LOCAL EVENTS

 

UPCOMING EVENTS THAT DO NOT REQUIRE ADVANCE RESERVATIONS

 

The monthly Nature Walk at San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary will take place on March 2 from 9:00am to 10:30am. Meet at the Audubon House. 


The monthly Bird Walk at San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary will take place on March 10 from 8:00am to 12:00pm. Meet at the Audubon House.   



UPCOMING EVENTS THAT REQUIRE ADVANCE RESERVATIONS


The Big Morongo Preserve field trip will take place on April 27. More details can be found here: http://www.seaandsageaudubon.org/FieldTrips/Trips/MorongoPreserve.html



WORKSHOPS AND CLASSES

 

Two bird banding workshops will be held at Audubon Starr Ranch Sanctuary in Trabuco Canyon in March 2019. The beginning workshop will be held on March 9 and 10 from 7:30am to 3:30pm, and the advanced workshop will be held during the same hours on March 16 and 17. For more details or to enroll, email seasonal ornithologist Robert Snowden at rsnowden@....

 

 

*****************************************************

 

The Orange County RBA and events summary is produced weekly by Ryan Winkleman and Jeff Bray in collaboration with Doug Willick. Sightings of rare birds can be posted to the OrangeCountyBirding listserv, emailed directly to Jeff Bray (jbray4913@...) and/or Ryan Winkleman (rswinkleman@...), and/or submitted to eBird (http://ebird.org/content/ebird). Any supporting details (descriptions, photos, audio recordings, etc.) of rare sightings that are not already disclosed on the listserv or on eBird should also be emailed to Ryan Winkleman separately for consideration to be mentioned in the current quarterly report for North American Birds.

 

Those sightings that are included in this summary generally include those that are considered rare (regionally or seasonally) for Orange County based on "The Birds of Orange County: Status and Distribution" (Hamilton and Willick), "Birds of Southern California" (Garrett and Dunn), and/or more contemporary changes in local or regional status and distribution. Rarities that regularly or seasonally occur at a particular location, such as annually wintering rarities on Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge, may not be included in this digest, but reports of these same species occurring at other, atypical locations throughout the county may be included. All bird reports are vetted to the extent possible prior to each publication, but in the interest of sharing information, the accuracy of any given report cannot always be guaranteed, nor can the presence of any given bird for those who choose to chase after them.

 

Information on upcoming local events is taken largely from the Sea and Sage Audubon website (http://www.seaandsageaudubon.org/). Sea and Sage Audubon is based out of the Audubon House at the San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary in Irvine. They sponsor a number of public field trips, special birding events, conservation lectures, and social gatherings throughout the year. Information regarding upcoming local events should be considered accurate at the time of this posting. However, for the most current information please refer to the field trip list on the Sea and Sage Audubon website at http://www.seaandsageaudubon.org/FieldTrips/FieldTripSchedule.html. It is also recommended that you refer to that website immediately prior to engaging in any field trip to confirm that trips are still occurring. If you know of additional upcoming events that are not sponsored directly by Sea and Sage Audubon, please email Ryan Winkleman and/or Jeff Bray for inclusion. #RBA



--
Ryan Winkleman
Rancho Santa Margarita

Orange County NAB Winter 2018/2019

Ryan Winkleman
 

Birders,

The Winter 2018/2019 reporting period for North American Birds has ended. I am currently compiling notable sightings in Orange County from during this period and will send a report to our regional editors Guy McCaskie and Kimball Garrett.

If you have information on a vagrant, a rare wintering bird, unpublished occurrence dates, or have noticed any particular trends in your local patches this winter that are not already submitted into eBird, please let me know by March 10. I don't use social media, so if it's not in eBird and you haven't told Jeff, I probably don't know about it.

Thanks!





--
Ryan Winkleman
Rancho Santa Margarita

Eastern Phoebe - Dana Point Headlands

Ryan Winkleman
 

Robin Lowe photographed an Eastern Phoebe at the Dana Point Headlands this afternoon.

--
Ryan Winkleman
Rancho Santa Margarita

Re: Eastern Phoebe - Dana Point Headlands

Ryan Winkleman
 

I apologize, upon receiving additional photos this was actually a Say's Phoebe. The single photo that I initially received appeared to show a distinctively black head and bright white chin with muddled underparts, but on additional photos these features were absent and the bird was very clearly the same bird and very clearly a Say's Phoebe.

Hopefully nobody spent a great deal of time looking for this bird. A good reminder to all, including those of us on the reviewing end of things, that identifying rare birds from a single photo can sometimes not end well...

--
Ryan Winkleman
Rancho Santa Margarita

helping hummingbirds

James Pike
 

A couple days ago, an article in the LA Times detailed the needs of the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center in Huntington Beach in taking care of a recent rain-related influx of hummingbirds. Twenty juveniles evidently need near round-the-clock feeding, and additional rain will expectedly deliver more. While the article didn't specifically make a financial plea on behalf of the Center, I found that visiting their online website made the process of donating especially easy. If this sounds like a good idea to you, give it a try.

Jim Pike
HB   

Re: Orange County NAB Winter 2018/2019

Ryan Winkleman
 

I'm wondering if anybody has any reports of Yellow-crowned Night-Herons in the county lately. I got a response yesterday that an adult bird was at Dana Point Harbor as recently as mid-February, but other than that I haven't heard anything since early January. Looking in eBird, it appears as if both Dana Point Harbor and Sunset Aquatic Marina have received scant attention from eBirders since early January. 

I would appreciate any reports to the contrary and any documentation of Yellow-crowned Night-Herons still being present in Orange County. Given our record number of birds in the county in fall 2018 and last year in general, I was hoping they'd stick around this time...
--
Ryan Winkleman
Rancho Santa Margarita

Tagged White pelican

Debbie Hanson
 

Good morning,

Thought this might be of interest to some.  Saw this pelican at Tri-city Park in Placentia, Sunday 3/3 around 4:00.
There were about a dozen others but this one was off on its own at the north end of the park.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/birdiemama/

All the best,
Debbie Hanson
Yorba Linda 

Re: Tagged White pelican

Debbie Hanson
 

Sorry.Emoji Here is the link to my flickr photo of the tagged pelican. 


Debbie Hanson
Yorba Linda

Re: Tagged White pelican

James Pike
 

Hi Debbie,

The tags appear to be related to a long-term study being conducted at two breeding colonies by the Idaho Dept of Fish and Game. White Pelicans that had experienced increasing breeding success at those two colonies were beginning to have an impact on native trout numbers and those of other game fish that are especially prized by recreational fishermen in Idaho. As a consequence, management efforts were initiated that include hazing, egg and nest destruction, and depredation, along with a banding study to determine the overall effects of these actions. While I found it interesting to discover just how many pelicans were wintering in the region, learning the story behind the study sapped my interest in any further reporting of band numbers.

Jim Pike
HB    

On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 9:46 AM Debbie Hanson <alan_hanson@...> wrote:
Sorry.Emoji Here is the link to my flickr photo of the tagged pelican. 


Debbie Hanson
Yorba Linda

Re: Tagged White pelican

Craig Hoover
 

The plan for Idaho's management of pelicans is open for comment it seems:

I worked for the agency in 1978 for two years looking at the possibility of special regulations for the fishery on the reservoir and river.  Looks like pelicans were a recent addition to the problem of what to do with the fish.  I remember tons of Utah chubs, suckers and carp in our trap at the mouth of the reservoir.  The agency sees these as making up 90 percent of the diet of pelicans in the area of the Blackfoot Reservoir.  The management plan is interesting reading.  I worked at a hatchery in that state too, feeding fish by hand. So seeing all that work get consumed by a bunch of birds instead of little kids and families out for  fishing trip conflicts me.

Craig Hoover
Costa Mesa CA

On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 10:37 AM James Pike <jimpike444@...> wrote:
Hi Debbie,

The tags appear to be related to a long-term study being conducted at two breeding colonies by the Idaho Dept of Fish and Game. White Pelicans that had experienced increasing breeding success at those two colonies were beginning to have an impact on native trout numbers and those of other game fish that are especially prized by recreational fishermen in Idaho. As a consequence, management efforts were initiated that include hazing, egg and nest destruction, and depredation, along with a banding study to determine the overall effects of these actions. While I found it interesting to discover just how many pelicans were wintering in the region, learning the story behind the study sapped my interest in any further reporting of band numbers.

Jim Pike
HB    

On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 9:46 AM Debbie Hanson <alan_hanson@...> wrote:
Sorry.Emoji Here is the link to my flickr photo of the tagged pelican. 


Debbie Hanson
Yorba Linda



--
Craig Hoover
Costa Mesa, CA

Two Loon day at Bolsa Chica

dave_telford
 

Today my wife and I birded Bolsa Chica. We had a Common Loon across the wooden foot bridge about 100 yards down the trail. There was a Red-throated Loon in the Wintersburg Channel. Other birds of note a Loggerhead Shrike at the far end of the Pocket Pond. A Merlin in a tree (close to where the Osprey hangs out) on the trail side of the Pocket Pond. On the way back to the parking lot we stopped at the view point just before the wooden foot bridge there was Bonaparte's Gull on the sandbar.


Dave Telford
Huntington Beach

Re: Tagged White pelican

Gjon Hazard
 

Jim:

While I can relate to your sapped enthusiasm for reporting, consider the alternative. When the time comes, the decision maker will be making a decision regardless of whether he or she has data. By suppressing information, will that decision be better or worse? Who can say? Whether a given decision is "good or bad" will always be in the eye of the beholder, but it seems to me, an *informed* decision will, in such circumstances, always be preferable to an uninformed decision. 

[And I say that fully aware of -- and, alas, all the more frustrated by -- our other recent communication.]

-Gjon


On Mar 4, 2019, at 10:37 AM, James Pike <jimpike444@...> wrote:

Hi Debbie,

The tags appear to be related to a long-term study being conducted at two breeding colonies by the Idaho Dept of Fish and Game. White Pelicans that had experienced increasing breeding success at those two colonies were beginning to have an impact on native trout numbers and those of other game fish that are especially prized by recreational fishermen in Idaho. As a consequence, management efforts were initiated that include hazing, egg and nest destruction, and depredation, along with a banding study to determine the overall effects of these actions. While I found it interesting to discover just how many pelicans were wintering in the region, learning the story behind the study sapped my interest in any further reporting of band numbers.

Jim Pike
HB    

On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 9:46 AM Debbie Hanson <alan_hanson@...> wrote:
Sorry.Emoji Here is the link to my flickr photo of the tagged pelican. 


Debbie Hanson
Yorba Linda

Re: Tagged White pelican

Linette Davenport
 

I didn’t check to see if the American White Pelican has any particular status in Idaho, but it is considered a Species of Special Concern by the State of California, so it is certainly worth reporting tagged individuals from Idaho when they are in California, since they are protected here. Any negative impacts to their populations while they are in other places would definitely be of interest to wildlife management at our state level and also the federal level.

 

Linette Davenport

Orange, CA

 

From: OrangeCountyBirding@groups.io <OrangeCountyBirding@groups.io> On Behalf Of Gjon Hazard
Sent: Monday, March 4, 2019 8:28 PM
To: James Pike <jimpike444@...>
Cc: Orangecountybirding <orangecountybirding@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OrangeCountyBirding] Tagged White pelican

 

Jim:

 

While I can relate to your sapped enthusiasm for reporting, consider the alternative. When the time comes, the decision maker will be making a decision regardless of whether he or she has data. By suppressing information, will that decision be better or worse? Who can say? Whether a given decision is "good or bad" will always be in the eye of the beholder, but it seems to me, an *informed* decision will, in such circumstances, always be preferable to an uninformed decision. 

 

[And I say that fully aware of -- and, alas, all the more frustrated by -- our other recent communication.]


-Gjon

 


On Mar 4, 2019, at 10:37 AM, James Pike <jimpike444@...> wrote:

Hi Debbie,

 

The tags appear to be related to a long-term study being conducted at two breeding colonies by the Idaho Dept of Fish and Game. White Pelicans that had experienced increasing breeding success at those two colonies were beginning to have an impact on native trout numbers and those of other game fish that are especially prized by recreational fishermen in Idaho. As a consequence, management efforts were initiated that include hazing, egg and nest destruction, and depredation, along with a banding study to determine the overall effects of these actions. While I found it interesting to discover just how many pelicans were wintering in the region, learning the story behind the study sapped my interest in any further reporting of band numbers.

 

Jim Pike

HB    

 

On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 9:46 AM Debbie Hanson <alan_hanson@...> wrote:

Sorry.Emoji Here is the link to my flickr photo of the tagged pelican. 

 

 

Debbie Hanson

Yorba Linda


--
Linette Davenport
Orange, CA

Continuing Bald Eagle in Newport Back Bay

Lam-Son Vinh
 

Standing on the observation deck of the Muth Building of Upper Newport Bay Nature Preserve and looking South, I saw and
photographed Kanoa, the male Bald Eagle from Santa Rosa Island. He was about a quarter mile away, but the wing tag with number 96 was readable.
He successfully captured a coot despite being harassed by a couple of gulls.  Here's the link to the photos:  https://photos.app.goo.gl/AuDeyW5TW9osNkUv9
--
Lam-Son Vinh
Huntington Beach, CA

Re: Tagged White pelican

Debbie Hanson
 

Good morning,

Thank you all for your responses on the tagged pelican.  Definite food for thought in the answers.

All the best,
Debbie Hanson
Yorba Linda