Date   

A new moth at the moth lights - Astoria, OR

Mike Patterson
 

I picked up a new species for the yard list when checking the
blacklights this morning.

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/126649120

A Blinded Sphinx (_Paonias excaecata_), considered "blinded",
because it lacks the central black "pupil" in the center of the
eyespots on the hindwings.

National Moth Week starts July 23, so it's time launder your
moth sheets and break out the blacklights, if you've not already
done so.

https://nationalmothweek.org/


--
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
I don't know...
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=3924


Lost Valley Reservoir, Adams County, ID

Kevin Burls
 

While most of my butterfly sightings are not far enough north for this list, this week the family was traveling back from Montana and we camped at Lost Valley Reservoir in Adams County, ID. We managed an impromptu survey that seems worth reporting just because of the extreme abundance and diversity of butterflies there- 16 species in maybe the space of 100 yards over the course of no more than no minutes from 11:30-1:00. Weather was a warm 82 degrees, no clouds. Habitat was lakeside with abundant asters, Ipomopsis, Geranium, Penstemon, Delphinium, Potentilla, Allium, Achillea millefolium, grasses, and at least one Eriogonum I am unfamiliar with. Really, just an amazing location. We may very well have found additional species with more time and space in the nearby areas.

And, before the list, I have to say that through all of Idaho and western Montana the pale swallowtails and to a lesser extent tiger swallowtails were at an abundance I have personally never seen- is this what you all get to have all the time?? The puddling action was easily in the hundreds at multiple places, among other observations. 

Finally, photos of the one (or two?) purported Euphilotes species (or maybe an unsilvered acmon??) are attached here. I have not done a thorough search of available records yet, I wanted to see what others here thought. I have no experience in this region. 

Lost Valley Reservoir, Adams Co., ID, 7/12/22

Papilio rutulus common
Papilio multicaudata 1-3 ind
Papilio eurymedon extremely abundant

Pontia occidentalis common

Icaricia lupini common
Icaricia saepiolus common
Icaricia icarioides common
Tharsalea helloides common
Euphilotes sp. 3 ind (possibly two species? Photos by Cynthia Scholl attached)

Euphydryas chalcedona common
Coenonympha californica common
Phyiodes pulchella common
Limenitis sp. abundant-- at first I assumed this was lorquini, but is it perhaps lorquini x weidemeyerii in this area? (Sorry no photos)
Nymphalis californica common

Erynnis pacuvius 1-3 ind
unidentified golden skipper

--Kevin Burls

Euphilotes 1.jpgEuphilotes 2.jpgEuphilotes 3.jpg


Satus Pass, WA

Dennis Deck
 

Monday (3/11) I checked out Satus Pass to see how it was holding up.
Only one seep had any water and the lower portion was fairly dry with
low butterfly activity, but I had 30 species for the day.

Dennis Deck
dennis.d.deck@...


[DesertLeps] Euphydryas pairs

Norbert Kondla
 



---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Norbert Kondla via groups.io <nkondla=telus.net@groups.io>
Date: Wed, Jul 13, 2022 at 6:43 AM
Subject: [DesertLeps] Euphydryas pairs
To: TILS <TILS@groups.io>, desertleps <desertleps@groups.io>


When I lived in extreme southern British Columbia for 10 years, I saw and collected a lot of Euphydryas in the nearby Pend-d'Oreille valley. I never did see a mating pair but I did see some courting behaviour and decided to document it by netting some. Here is a link to a couple of examples of courting pairs
--
Norbert Kondla
Calgary, Alberta, Canada  (elevation 1060 metres asl)



--
Norbert Kondla
Calgary, Alberta, Canada  (elevation 1060 metres asl)


Lycaena heteronea

Norbert Kondla
 

Another old pocket camera pic uploaded to flickr; showing some dorsal color variation in British Columbia
https://flic.kr/p/2nxJoVK

--
Norbert Kondla
Calgary, Alberta, Canada  (elevation 1060 metres asl)


Euphydryas whatever veazieae

Norbert Kondla
 

I put some fresh annotation on an old pocket camera pic from 2004. Here is topotype Euphydryas bernadetta wenatchee from Washington state. Alternative taxonomic hypotheses: E. bernadetta veazieae, E. anicia veazieae, etc
 https://flic.kr/p/2nxkY4X
Pick the one you like or pick some other hypothesis ---
I would not be surprised if some folks would prefer to call these E. chalcedona, in keeping with the mega-lump taxonomic hypothesis that was briefly popular in the past.
Interesting that a purported lumper created a possibly mega-split taxonomic option.

--
Norbert Kondla
Calgary, Alberta, Canada  (elevation 1060 metres asl)


Euphydryas editha taylori

Norbert Kondla
 

Today while looking through some specimen boxes, I noticed some nice specimens of Euphydryas editha taylori. So I held a camera over them and made a digital plate---
https://flic.kr/p/2nvWT4g

--
Norbert Kondla
Calgary, Alberta, Canada  (elevation 1060 metres asl)


Re: Mount Ashland Report

Kenneth Davenport
 

David: I was up on Mt. Ashland Thursday and had a similar lists as yours but had another Arctic Skipper, a Roadside Skipper, Lindsey's Skipper, another Gray Marble and a female Moss Elfin at about 8000' on the PCT, in association with the Sedum Parnassians use, Great Arctics were flying up to 8000,, also had a West Coast Lady...Ken
   Added note: Rob Santry says Arctic Skippers are regular. He and I were working the McCloud-Pondosa areas today, July 1st.

Best wishes,
Ken
kdavenport93306@... or
flutterflies93306@...



From: NorWestLeps@groups.io <NorWestLeps@groups.io> on behalf of david@davidleemyersphoto <david@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 30, 2022 12:39:06 PM
To: NorWestLeps@groups.io <NorWestLeps@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [NorWestLeps] Mount Ashland Report
 
Ken: I do not remember seeing Arctic Skippers on Mt. Ashland. I know people who see more things than I do, so that’s not evidence of their absence. I’ll be interested in what you come across.

— David

On Jun 30, 2022, at 6:48 AM, Kenneth Davenport via groups.io <kdavenport93306@...> wrote:

David: I was on Old Hwy. 99 on Mt. Ashland yesterday JUNE 29th and had 33 species including the Arctic Skipper, Great Arctic, Roadside Skipper, Gray Marble, Margined White and Thicket Hairstreak as highlights along with Elaine's Fritillary and Northern Checkerspots. I will be doing the upper levels of Mt. Ashland today. Are Arctic Skippers known from there? I saw 4 of them and collected 2 of them, the 2 were freshly emerged. I asume they are skada...Ken Davenport


From: NorWestLeps@groups.io <NorWestLeps@groups.io> on behalf of david@davidleemyersphoto <david@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 28, 2022 11:14:52 AM
To: norwestleps@groups.io <norwestleps@groups.io>
Subject: [NorWestLeps] Mount Ashland Report
 
Mount Ashland to Grouse Gap on the Siskiyou Crest, southern Jackson County, Oregon
Monday 27 June 2022
11:00am to 3:00pm
73°F, full sun, breezy.

Duskywings, probably Persius and/or Pacuvius — ABUNDANT
Anise Swallowtail—SEVERAL
Pale Tiger Swallowtail—SEVERAL
Sulphur-pale white female, Orange or maybe Clouded
Large Marble—MAYBE SEVERAL, hard to see when flying far away
Western White—SEVERAL
Sheridan’s Hairstreak— ABUNDANT
Brown Elfin—ONE
Silvery Blue—SEVERAL
Arrowhead Blue—SEVERAL
Echo Blue—SEVERAL
Summit Blue (Euphilotes glaucon) —ABUNDANT
Western Meadow Fritillary
Lorquin’s Admiral—SEVERAL
California Sister—ONE
Mylitta Crescentspot—SEVERAL
California Tortoiseshell— ABUNDANT
Zephyr Anglewing— ABUNDANT
Satyr Anglewing— ABUNDANT
Painted Lady—ONE
California (Gray) Buckeye—SEVERAL

All except the Cal Sister and Pale Tiger were photographed.


— David




David Lee Myers
david@...
www.DavidLeeMyersPhoto.com
681 Nepenthe Road
Ashland, OR 97520 USA
503-791-6622


David Lee Myers
503-791-6622
david@...
www.DavidLeeMyersPhoto.com




Re: Mount Ashland Report

david@davidleemyersphoto
 

Ken: I do not remember seeing Arctic Skippers on Mt. Ashland. I know people who see more things than I do, so that’s not evidence of their absence. I’ll be interested in what you come across.

— David

On Jun 30, 2022, at 6:48 AM, Kenneth Davenport via groups.io <kdavenport93306@...> wrote:

David: I was on Old Hwy. 99 on Mt. Ashland yesterday JUNE 29th and had 33 species including the Arctic Skipper, Great Arctic, Roadside Skipper, Gray Marble, Margined White and Thicket Hairstreak as highlights along with Elaine's Fritillary and Northern Checkerspots. I will be doing the upper levels of Mt. Ashland today. Are Arctic Skippers known from there? I saw 4 of them and collected 2 of them, the 2 were freshly emerged. I asume they are skada...Ken Davenport


From: NorWestLeps@groups.io <NorWestLeps@groups.io> on behalf of david@davidleemyersphoto <david@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 28, 2022 11:14:52 AM
To: norwestleps@groups.io <norwestleps@groups.io>
Subject: [NorWestLeps] Mount Ashland Report
 
Mount Ashland to Grouse Gap on the Siskiyou Crest, southern Jackson County, Oregon
Monday 27 June 2022
11:00am to 3:00pm
73°F, full sun, breezy.

Duskywings, probably Persius and/or Pacuvius — ABUNDANT
Anise Swallowtail—SEVERAL
Pale Tiger Swallowtail—SEVERAL
Sulphur-pale white female, Orange or maybe Clouded
Large Marble—MAYBE SEVERAL, hard to see when flying far away
Western White—SEVERAL
Sheridan’s Hairstreak— ABUNDANT
Brown Elfin—ONE
Silvery Blue—SEVERAL
Arrowhead Blue—SEVERAL
Echo Blue—SEVERAL
Summit Blue (Euphilotes glaucon) —ABUNDANT
Western Meadow Fritillary
Lorquin’s Admiral—SEVERAL
California Sister—ONE
Mylitta Crescentspot—SEVERAL
California Tortoiseshell— ABUNDANT
Zephyr Anglewing— ABUNDANT
Satyr Anglewing— ABUNDANT
Painted Lady—ONE
California (Gray) Buckeye—SEVERAL

All except the Cal Sister and Pale Tiger were photographed.


— David




David Lee Myers
david@...
www.DavidLeeMyersPhoto.com
681 Nepenthe Road
Ashland, OR 97520 USA
503-791-6622


David Lee Myers
503-791-6622
david@...
www.DavidLeeMyersPhoto.com




Re: Mount Ashland Report

Kenneth Davenport
 

David: I was on Old Hwy. 99 on Mt. Ashland yesterday JUNE 29th and had 33 species including the Arctic Skipper, Great Arctic, Roadside Skipper, Gray Marble, Margined White and Thicket Hairstreak as highlights along with Elaine's Fritillary and Northern Checkerspots. I will be doing the upper levels of Mt. Ashland today. Are Arctic Skippers known from there? I saw 4 of them and collected 2 of them, the 2 were freshly emerged. I asume they are skada...Ken Davenport

Best wishes,
Ken
kdavenport93306@... or
flutterflies93306@...



From: NorWestLeps@groups.io <NorWestLeps@groups.io> on behalf of david@davidleemyersphoto <david@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 28, 2022 11:14:52 AM
To: norwestleps@groups.io <norwestleps@groups.io>
Subject: [NorWestLeps] Mount Ashland Report
 
Mount Ashland to Grouse Gap on the Siskiyou Crest, southern Jackson County, Oregon
Monday 27 June 2022
11:00am to 3:00pm
73°F, full sun, breezy.

Duskywings, probably Persius and/or Pacuvius — ABUNDANT
Anise Swallowtail—SEVERAL
Pale Tiger Swallowtail—SEVERAL
Sulphur-pale white female, Orange or maybe Clouded
Large Marble—MAYBE SEVERAL, hard to see when flying far away
Western White—SEVERAL
Sheridan’s Hairstreak— ABUNDANT
Brown Elfin—ONE
Silvery Blue—SEVERAL
Arrowhead Blue—SEVERAL
Echo Blue—SEVERAL
Summit Blue (Euphilotes glaucon) —ABUNDANT
Western Meadow Fritillary
Lorquin’s Admiral—SEVERAL
California Sister—ONE
Mylitta Crescentspot—SEVERAL
California Tortoiseshell— ABUNDANT
Zephyr Anglewing— ABUNDANT
Satyr Anglewing— ABUNDANT
Painted Lady—ONE
California (Gray) Buckeye—SEVERAL

All except the Cal Sister and Pale Tiger were photographed.


— David




David Lee Myers
david@...
www.DavidLeeMyersPhoto.com
681 Nepenthe Road
Ashland, OR 97520 USA
503-791-6622


Mount Ashland Report

david@davidleemyersphoto
 

Mount Ashland to Grouse Gap on the Siskiyou Crest, southern Jackson County, Oregon
Monday 27 June 2022
11:00am to 3:00pm
73°F, full sun, breezy.

Duskywings, probably Persius and/or Pacuvius — ABUNDANT
Anise Swallowtail—SEVERAL
Pale Tiger Swallowtail—SEVERAL
Sulphur-pale white female, Orange or maybe Clouded
Large Marble—MAYBE SEVERAL, hard to see when flying far away
Western White—SEVERAL
Sheridan’s Hairstreak— ABUNDANT
Brown Elfin—ONE
Silvery Blue—SEVERAL
Arrowhead Blue—SEVERAL
Echo Blue—SEVERAL
Summit Blue (Euphilotes glaucon) —ABUNDANT
Western Meadow Fritillary
Lorquin’s Admiral—SEVERAL
California Sister—ONE
Mylitta Crescentspot—SEVERAL
California Tortoiseshell— ABUNDANT
Zephyr Anglewing— ABUNDANT
Satyr Anglewing— ABUNDANT
Painted Lady—ONE
California (Gray) Buckeye—SEVERAL

All except the Cal Sister and Pale Tiger were photographed.


— David




David Lee Myers
david@...
www.DavidLeeMyersPhoto.com
681 Nepenthe Road
Ashland, OR 97520 USA
503-791-6622


Re: FOY Tiger Swallowtail in Seattle

Carolyn H
 

Walking around Green Lake on Friday, I saw a half dozen Western Tiger Swallowtails. They were mostly flying high over the path. I've seen a couple more at my house in Fremont Neighborhood.

What struck me was that I haven't seen many Cabbage Whites. Ordinarily they are prolific at my house.

- Carolyn Heberlein - Fremont Neighborhood, Seattle, Washington - Landline: 206-633-2313


On Saturday, June 25, 2022, 03:08:38 PM PDT, Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart@...> wrote:


Late yesterday afternoon I finally saw my first Western Tiger Swallowtails coming to the spot in Lincoln Park, West Seattle, with good end of day sun where, every year, they repeatedly perch and fly until sun climbs up, and over, the trees, the first I saw flying by 6:53 pm (about when I arrived), and a second joining that one by 7:02 (when I left) .  And yesterday and today might be the first days I was regularly seeing Western Tigers in the park.  This is notably later than usual.

-Stewart


Re: FOY Tiger Swallowtail in Seattle

Stewart Wechsler
 

Late yesterday afternoon I finally saw my first Western Tiger Swallowtails coming to the spot in Lincoln Park, West Seattle, with good end of day sun where, every year, they repeatedly perch and fly until sun climbs up, and over, the trees, the first I saw flying by 6:53 pm (about when I arrived), and a second joining that one by 7:02 (when I left) .  And yesterday and today might be the first days I was regularly seeing Western Tigers in the park.  This is notably later than usual.

-Stewart

On Wed, Jun 22, 2022 at 12:15 PM Stewart Wechsler via groups.io <ecostewart=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Carlolyn, 

It is good to get your urban Western Tiger Swallowtail record!  I am finding them later than usual this year in my West Seattle Lincoln Park, and in smaller numbers than usual for mid-June.  I generally find them in more urbanized areas later than relatively natural areas, such as Lincoln Park.  Late yesterday afternoon I showed a friend a spot where every year they regularly, and repeatedly, perch and fly in the last of the day's good sun, as the sun climbs from covering the road to the tree tops, to only touching the upper parts of the cedars and doug-firs before sunset, through most of their flight season, but we didn't see any there, and I haven't seen any there on the few days I've now checked.

-Stewart

On Tue, Jun 21, 2022 at 7:32 PM Sue Orlowski <sueosp1@...> wrote:
Good for you. I saw my first Lorquin Admiral today.
Sue 


On Jun 21, 2022, at 6:55 PM, Carolyn H via groups.io <coheberlein=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I saw my first Tiger Swallowtail today at my home in the Fremont neighborhood of Seattle.
It is about 3 weeks later than other years!


Re: Help identifying a blue from June 2019, Olympia Airport

mcallisters4
 

Well, I managed to get some really knowledgeable people to look at my Rainier Road mud puddle photos (some input came to me at my personal email) and I’m happy to say that, while I had a couple of errors in my identifications, everybody else was pretty much in agreement (Bob was hedging a bit on images 0080 & 0084 or it would have been perfect agreement). It’s been really helpful for me. No doubt all that I learned is in the field guides on my shelves. Still, it’s been super helpful to use some example photos and get some specific guidance on the field marks. I know what to look for now. Thanks to all who were willing to bear with me on this.

 

Kelly McAllister


Re: Help identifying a blue from June 2019, Olympia Airport

tlpyle@...
 

Kelly, to your good set of photographs--my Rx here instead of on Flickr.

Most of your IDs are spot-on, as Icaricia.

The first couple you thought might be Glaucopsyche (0161, 0159) are Icaricia, as Kelsey (who clearly has a practiced and good eye for these) has also indicated. Their distal spots are light, but present. Note that these can be VERY subtle, asp. on the vhw, but there is almost always some scaling collected into even rudimentary spots.

Your 0136 Silvery is indeed Glaucopsyche, as Kelsey concurs--old, dark, no distal spots, basal blue flush (pronounced (both species can have this, but it's often a little more pronounced in silveries. Good call.

Ditto on 0093--they are indeed a nice sideXside of both species, field guide material!

The only two I'm slightly uneasy about are 0084 and 0080; possibly all Icaricia--I'd much rather have them in the hand with a loupe, and see the dorsum as well. Sometimes the iris is large on Boisduval's and the halo as  contrasty as on silveries. The ground color is uncomfortably light on these.

And finally our old friend, oddment of an Icaricia on a fern, which began the whole thing!

Thanks for sharing these.

Bob P.










 


On 2022-06-23 11:18 pm, mcallisters4 wrote:

I'm still digesting the useful advice and photos. I discovered that my memory of confusing blues at the wet rutted depression along Rainier Road near Johnson's Prairie wasn't as long ago as I had thought. It was 26 May 2005 and I uploaded about 13 of the images to my Flickr page linked below. I did my best, using some of what I've just learned, to identify the butterflies in the description for each image. There were Silvery Blues, Icaricia, and Western Tailed Blues there that day. Of particular interest, to me, is image 036, a blue with a dark brown background on the ventral hind wing. I decided the dot pattern best matches Silvery Blue but I'd be curious what others think. Of course, any corrections or comments are welcome.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/29002564@N08/52168030022/in/dateposted-public/

 

Kelly McAllister

Olympia

 


Re: Help identifying a blue from June 2019, Olympia Airport

tlpyle@...
 

Ha ha, Kelly! Yes, pretty silly. Not many folks with nets out there these days, we could surely use more. I understand the principle but dislike the practice of obscuring data for rare species, as it generates errors on maps and sometimes backfires for sites not yet protected.

Bob

 


On 2022-06-23 8:23 pm, mcallisters4 wrote:

Never mind my comment about Blackmore's Blue being found in downtown Rainier. In fact, ignore my reference to Olympia Airport in the Subject line of my original post. iNaturalist is obscuring the locations for this subspecies due, I guess, the potential for hoards of butterfly collectors with nets to descend upon these butterfly populations and wipe them out! Ludicrous.

 

Kelly McAllister


Re: Help identifying a blue from June 2019, Olympia Airport

tlpyle@...
 

Very good, Caitlin--thanks so much.

Yes, # 7469 looks very much like Kelly's blue, including the dark cell bar. OK, I am convinced.  It would be nice if BOA could add some of these to its rather paltry images of this taxon.

Helpful discussion for all, I presume.

Bob

 


On 2022-06-23 8:25 pm, Caitlin LaBar wrote:

Here are some images from my field work at Johnson Prairie back in 2006. Including one dorsal male that has an exceptionally wide brown border, to illustrate what I mentioned to Kelly in the other thread about dorsal characteristics.
Regarding the ventral markings, in particular look at the image ending in #7469.
 
Caitlin
 
 


Re: Help identifying a blue from June 2019, Olympia Airport

mcallisters4
 

I’m still digesting the useful advice and photos. I discovered that my memory of confusing blues at the wet rutted depression along Rainier Road near Johnson’s Prairie wasn’t as long ago as I had thought. It was 26 May 2005 and I uploaded about 13 of the images to my Flickr page linked below. I did my best, using some of what I’ve just learned, to identify the butterflies in the description for each image. There were Silvery Blues, Icaricia, and Western Tailed Blues there that day. Of particular interest, to me, is image 036, a blue with a dark brown background on the ventral hind wing. I decided the dot pattern best matches Silvery Blue but I’d be curious what others think. Of course, any corrections or comments are welcome.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/29002564@N08/52168030022/in/dateposted-public/

 

Kelly McAllister

Olympia

 


Re: Help identifying a blue from June 2019, Olympia Airport

Caitlin LaBar
 

Here are some images from my field work at Johnson Prairie back in 2006. Including one dorsal male that has an exceptionally wide brown border, to illustrate what I mentioned to Kelly in the other thread about dorsal characteristics.
Regarding the ventral markings, in particular look at the image ending in #7469.

Caitlin

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


On Thu, Jun 23, 2022 at 6:53 PM Kelsey King <kelsey.king216@...> wrote:
Must not have attached using the group site. 

I’ll try using email. 



On Thu, Jun 23, 2022 at 17:31 kelsey.king216 via groups.io <kelsey.king216=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

This looks like the gray Pugets to me, from the Joint Base area. I haven’t seen many azures there myself. 


Here are some pictures from Johnson prairie, you can see all the variety! 


p.s. please excuse the ones with sharpie marks from our mark recapture study. 

 

--
Best,
Kelsey C. King
Pronouns: she & her


Re: Help identifying a blue from June 2019, Olympia Airport

mcallisters4
 

Never mind my comment about Blackmore’s Blue being found in downtown Rainier. In fact, ignore my reference to Olympia Airport in the Subject line of my original post. iNaturalist is obscuring the locations for this subspecies due, I guess, the potential for hoards of butterfly collectors with nets to descend upon these butterfly populations and wipe them out! Ludicrous.

 

Kelly McAllister

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