Date   

Celastrina - SW Alberta

Norbert Kondla
 

Here another fun graphic, this one from SW Alberta, where 3 species of Celastrina have been found
https://flic.kr/p/2nhDKyX

--
Norbert Kondla
Calgary, Alberta, Canada  (elevation 1060 metres asl)


Celastrina echo - British Columbia

Norbert Kondla
 

There is geographic variation in Celastrina echo in southern British Columbia. See for example some males https://flic.kr/p/2nhD31r
Will share a female comparison when it is done ---

--
Norbert Kondla
Calgary, Alberta, Canada  (elevation 1060 metres asl)


Re: real Celastrina lucia and dorsal colors

bob Parsons
 

Very nice comparisons Norbert. Hopefully the valley/Waneta will not be so dry this coming July.

Bob

On Fri, Apr 29, 2022 at 7:40 PM Norbert Kondla <nkondla@...> wrote:
Dorsal colors, when you can see them, can be useful to distinguish between some Celastrina species. This despite the effects of lighting variables. C. lucia does have a substantially different dorsal color in comparison to C. echo and C. asheri. C. lucia is primarily a species of the boreal northwest of our continent, mostly western Canada. And so it is not readily available to the great majority of the people on these discussion groups; either as live bugs or as specimens in envelopes or stuck on pins. So I am sharing another crude comparison graphic that shows what you would likely see if you put some specimens side by side under moderate room lighting. Does not matter what color names one wants to use or what numerical color comparison scheme one wishes to use; most people will see these as substantially different
https://flic.kr/p/2nhvMNk

--
Norbert Kondla
Calgary, Alberta, Canada  (elevation 1060 metres asl)


real Celastrina lucia and dorsal colors

Norbert Kondla
 

Dorsal colors, when you can see them, can be useful to distinguish between some Celastrina species. This despite the effects of lighting variables. C. lucia does have a substantially different dorsal color in comparison to C. echo and C. asheri. C. lucia is primarily a species of the boreal northwest of our continent, mostly western Canada. And so it is not readily available to the great majority of the people on these discussion groups; either as live bugs or as specimens in envelopes or stuck on pins. So I am sharing another crude comparison graphic that shows what you would likely see if you put some specimens side by side under moderate room lighting. Does not matter what color names one wants to use or what numerical color comparison scheme one wishes to use; most people will see these as substantially different
https://flic.kr/p/2nhvMNk

--
Norbert Kondla
Calgary, Alberta, Canada  (elevation 1060 metres asl)


Re: Illinois County, Oregon Trip Results

Norbert Kondla
 

Hi Neil. Very nice blog posting. I have seen lots of puddle clubs by C. echo and C. asheri when I lived in southern BC. Interestingly, I have never seen a puddle club of Celastrina lucia in 50 field seasons. 


On Fri, Apr 29, 2022 at 4:40 PM Neil Bjorklund <nel-de-bearck@...> wrote:

Not as exciting as a new species, but I had a good trip this past weekend to the Illinois Valley in Josephine County, Oregon.  My target was the elusive (for me) Spring White (Pontia sisymbrii).  Overall butterfly numbers seemed below normal, which is not surprising given the long spell of cool, rainy weather that preceded my visit.  I had two sunny days sandwiched between clouds and light rain for my search.  No joy on the P. sisymbrii, but 21 species is not a bad tally for cool weather in April.  Echo Blues (Celastrina echo) were by far the most numerous species by a factor of more than 5:1.

 

My accounting of the trip is on my blog here:  https://www.butterfliesoforegon.com/post/searching-for-spring

 

Here’s the species list and counts for the two days:

 

Propertius Duskywing

Erynnis propertius

44

Persius Duskywing

Erynnis persius

8

Common Checkered-Skipper

Burnsius communis

17

Anise Swallowtail

Papilio zelicaon

23

Indra Swallowtail

Papilio indra

1

Pale Swallowtail

Papilio eurymedon

5

White sp.

White sp.

4

Sara’s Orangetip

Anthocharis sara

15

Gray Marble

Anthocharis lanceolata

1

Pearly Marble

Euchloe hyantis

3

Mustard White

Pieris marginalis

5

Nelson's Hairstreak

Callophrys gryneus

1

Brown Elfin

Callophrys augustinus

1

Echo Azure

Celastrina echo

217

Silvery Blue

Glaucopsyche lygdamus

2

Western Tailed-Blue

Cupido amyntula

1

Greenish Blue

Icaricia saepiolus

2

Acmon Blue

Icaricia acmon

4

California Tortoiseshell

Nymphalis californica

26

Northern Checkerspot

Chlosyne palla

2

Mylitta Crescent

Phyciodes mylitta

11

Common Ringlet

Coenonympha california

22

 



--
Norbert Kondla
Calgary, Alberta, Canada  (elevation 1060 metres asl)


Illinois County, Oregon Trip Results

Neil Bjorklund
 

Not as exciting as a new species, but I had a good trip this past weekend to the Illinois Valley in Josephine County, Oregon.  My target was the elusive (for me) Spring White (Pontia sisymbrii).  Overall butterfly numbers seemed below normal, which is not surprising given the long spell of cool, rainy weather that preceded my visit.  I had two sunny days sandwiched between clouds and light rain for my search.  No joy on the P. sisymbrii, but 21 species is not a bad tally for cool weather in April.  Echo Blues (Celastrina echo) were by far the most numerous species by a factor of more than 5:1.

 

My accounting of the trip is on my blog here:  https://www.butterfliesoforegon.com/post/searching-for-spring

 

Here’s the species list and counts for the two days:

 

Propertius Duskywing

Erynnis propertius

44

Persius Duskywing

Erynnis persius

8

Common Checkered-Skipper

Burnsius communis

17

Anise Swallowtail

Papilio zelicaon

23

Indra Swallowtail

Papilio indra

1

Pale Swallowtail

Papilio eurymedon

5

White sp.

White sp.

4

Sara’s Orangetip

Anthocharis sara

15

Gray Marble

Anthocharis lanceolata

1

Pearly Marble

Euchloe hyantis

3

Mustard White

Pieris marginalis

5

Nelson's Hairstreak

Callophrys gryneus

1

Brown Elfin

Callophrys augustinus

1

Echo Azure

Celastrina echo

217

Silvery Blue

Glaucopsyche lygdamus

2

Western Tailed-Blue

Cupido amyntula

1

Greenish Blue

Icaricia saepiolus

2

Acmon Blue

Icaricia acmon

4

California Tortoiseshell

Nymphalis californica

26

Northern Checkerspot

Chlosyne palla

2

Mylitta Crescent

Phyciodes mylitta

11

Common Ringlet

Coenonympha california

22

 


Re: Celastrina asheri vs Celastrina lucia 'quesnellii'

Caitlin LaBar <lepidoptera85@...>
 

That’s a good comparison, thanks Norbert!
You can also see the slight size difference of lucia averaging smaller.

Caitlin 


On Apr 29, 2022, at 3:14 PM, Norbert Kondla <nkondla@...> wrote:


Recently I spent some time looking for Celastrina specimens in the papered specimen morgue and found a box with some interesting contents so I laid out a few specimens for a crude comparison image. https://flic.kr/p/2nhoUw3
In 2004 I collected asheri late April in southern BC and about 2 weeks later drove north to visit Cris Guppy in central BC. There I collected lucia 'quesnellii'. So the crude comparison image is useful because the specimens are comparable age and there is no confusion caused by age-related fading.

--
Norbert Kondla
Calgary, Alberta, Canada  (elevation 1060 metres asl)


Celastrina asheri vs Celastrina lucia 'quesnellii'

Norbert Kondla
 

Recently I spent some time looking for Celastrina specimens in the papered specimen morgue and found a box with some interesting contents so I laid out a few specimens for a crude comparison image. https://flic.kr/p/2nhoUw3
In 2004 I collected asheri late April in southern BC and about 2 weeks later drove north to visit Cris Guppy in central BC. There I collected lucia 'quesnellii'. So the crude comparison image is useful because the specimens are comparable age and there is no confusion caused by age-related fading.

--
Norbert Kondla
Calgary, Alberta, Canada  (elevation 1060 metres asl)


Etymology of Celastrina asheri

Carolyn H
 

Where did asheri come from? It is a lovely story.
I downloaded the paper  - The Taxomonic Report of the International Lepidopterist Survey for April 28, 2022.   See page 11 for the explanation.
https://wabutterflyassoc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/T-REPORT-103-Celastrina-asheri.pdf


- Carolyn Heberlein - Fremont Neighborhood, Seattle, Washington - Landline: 206-633-2313


Celastrina name 'quesnellii'

Norbert Kondla
 

Today I was asked how the name quesnellii fits into the Celastrina picture. In case anyone else is wondering about that, here is a link to a paper that talks about the matter:


Some Celastrina asheri males

Norbert Kondla
 

Here some males from near Carmi, British Columbia
https://flic.kr/p/2nhweAp

--
Norbert Kondla
Calgary, Alberta, Canada  (elevation 1060 metres asl)


Re: New butterfly species described

Neil Bjorklund
 

Congratulations Caitlin, Jon and Norbert!  This is very exciting.  I love the naming choice!  Can’t wait to go search for them in Oregon in May.

 

Neil

 

Neil Björklund

Eugene, Oregon

_______________________

www.butterfliesoforegon.com

 

 

 

From: <NorWestLeps@groups.io> on behalf of "Caitlin LaBar via groups.io" <lepidoptera85@...>
Reply-To: <NorWestLeps@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, April 28, 2022 at 4:06 PM
To: NorWestLeps <norwestleps@groups.io>
Subject: [NorWestLeps] New butterfly species described

 

Introducing Celastrina asheri, Asher's Blue!

Journal article can be viewed or downloaded here: https://zenodo.org/record/6502157
My blog: 
https://northwestbutterflies.blogspot.com/2022/04/introducing-new-butterfly-species.html

It was a big team effort, decades in the making, but only in the last 2-3 years were we able to put the pieces together. Exciting stuff!

 

Caitlin

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

northwestbutterflies.com

northwestbutterflies@...


Re: New butterfly species described

bob Parsons
 

Great project, thanks to all who worked so hard on this.
Have some big plans for Washington this July.

Bob P Edmonton


On Thu, Apr 28, 2022 at 5:06 PM Caitlin LaBar via groups.io <lepidoptera85=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Introducing Celastrina asheri, Asher's Blue!
Journal article can be viewed or downloaded here: https://zenodo.org/record/6502157
My blog: https://northwestbutterflies.blogspot.com/2022/04/introducing-new-butterfly-species.html

It was a big team effort, decades in the making, but only in the last 2-3 years were we able to put the pieces together. Exciting stuff!

Caitlin


New butterfly species described

Caitlin LaBar <lepidoptera85@...>
 

Introducing Celastrina asheri, Asher's Blue!
Journal article can be viewed or downloaded here: https://zenodo.org/record/6502157
My blog: https://northwestbutterflies.blogspot.com/2022/04/introducing-new-butterfly-species.html

It was a big team effort, decades in the making, but only in the last 2-3 years were we able to put the pieces together. Exciting stuff!

Caitlin

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
northwestbutterflies.com
northwestbutterflies@...


First Three of Year (F3OY)

Bill Yake
 

Finally, some sustained sun. First rainless day after 10 days of measurable precipitation (including some with intermittent ice pellets) and a long stretch of very chilly days here at the south end of the Salish Sea/ Puget Sound.

We rarely get 3 butterfly species in a day in the neighborhood, but we got that today along with rare clear views of a Hermit Thrush and a Pacific Wren: https://www.flickr.com/photos/myake/albums/72177720298182462

Be well,

Bill


Re: Washington Butterfly Association Meeting on April 6 at 6 pm - "The Reports of the Death of the Monarch are Greatly Exaggerated"

Carolyn H
 

Correction: The meeting is on April 6. My apologies.

- Carolyn Heberlein - Fremont Neighborhood, Seattle, Washington - Landline: 206-633-2313


On Tuesday, April 5, 2022, 08:48:37 PM PDT, Carolyn H via groups.io <coheberlein@...> wrote:


Washington Butterfly Association Zoom Meeting on April 5 at 6 pm - "The Reports of the Death of the Monarch are Greatly Exaggerated" by Dr. David James of Washington State University.

Register in advance for this meeting:

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

BIO:

Fifty-two years ago, just a few weeks before the very first Earth Day, David James started his butterfly conservation career.  He wrote to his local newspaper imploring the town council to stop cutting down stinging nettles!  Nettles are the food for caterpillars of Peacock and Tortoiseshell butterflies!  This led to an interview and feature article in the newspaper where 15-year-old David talked of the need to conserve British butterflies.

A university degree in Zoology followed as well as a career as an agricultural entomologist with New South Wales Department of Agriculture and Washington State University, but David never forgot his butterfly roots. He researched Australian Monarch biology for his PhD and published many studies on butterfly biology and conservation in Australia and the Pacific Northwest.  As one of the Daves in Dave Squared, he co-authored the ‘magisterial’ (according to David Attenborough) “Life Histories of Cascadia Butterflies”, then wrote “The Book of Caterpillars”.  He is currently working on the “Lives of Butterflies” to be published in 2023.

Talk Outline:

David will present an overview of western monarch population dynamics and ecology focusing on the past five years.  Based on his knowledge of Monarch biology and ecology that stretches across two continents and four decades, David will provide a holistic explanation of the recent decline (and increase) and the reasons why monarchs and their migration will persist in the west for decades to come.







- Carolyn Heberlein - Fremont Neighborhood, Seattle, Washington - Landline: 206-633-2313


Washington Butterfly Association Meeting on April 5 at 6 pm - "The Reports of the Death of the Monarch are Greatly Exaggerated"

Carolyn H
 

Washington Butterfly Association Zoom Meeting on April 5 at 6 pm - "The Reports of the Death of the Monarch are Greatly Exaggerated" by Dr. David James of Washington State University.

Register in advance for this meeting:

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

BIO:

Fifty-two years ago, just a few weeks before the very first Earth Day, David James started his butterfly conservation career.  He wrote to his local newspaper imploring the town council to stop cutting down stinging nettles!  Nettles are the food for caterpillars of Peacock and Tortoiseshell butterflies!  This led to an interview and feature article in the newspaper where 15-year-old David talked of the need to conserve British butterflies.

A university degree in Zoology followed as well as a career as an agricultural entomologist with New South Wales Department of Agriculture and Washington State University, but David never forgot his butterfly roots. He researched Australian Monarch biology for his PhD and published many studies on butterfly biology and conservation in Australia and the Pacific Northwest.  As one of the Daves in Dave Squared, he co-authored the ‘magisterial’ (according to David Attenborough) “Life Histories of Cascadia Butterflies”, then wrote “The Book of Caterpillars”.  He is currently working on the “Lives of Butterflies” to be published in 2023.

Talk Outline:

David will present an overview of western monarch population dynamics and ecology focusing on the past five years.  Based on his knowledge of Monarch biology and ecology that stretches across two continents and four decades, David will provide a holistic explanation of the recent decline (and increase) and the reasons why monarchs and their migration will persist in the west for decades to come.







- Carolyn Heberlein - Fremont Neighborhood, Seattle, Washington - Landline: 206-633-2313


Re: Remarkable news!

tlpyle@...
 

Perhaps they still are, Neil! Only Grover Krantz named them Gigantopithecus canadensis. Surely if there is a Michoacan variant it should be G. piegrande?
BP

On Fri, April 1, 2022 7:53 am, Neil Jones wrote:
The delay in reporting the figures for the size of the Mexican monarch
overwintering colonies has been explained today in a remarkable revelation.

The results of a top secret research project have finally been revealed
to the public. The findings have caused ripples of excitement across the
scientific community. A research group of paleontologists has been
working in the area of the colonies and they have made some remarkable
finds.

Subfossil bones dating back to around only 2 millennia ago have been
unearthed from the nearby forest. Detailed examination by experts has
shown they belong to an giant species of ape. The ape named
Gigantopithecus epimenides by experts is believed to be an extinct 10
foot tall orangutan which lived swinging from the trees in the oyalmel
forests.

Work on excavating the bones delayed the counting work but it was done
with extreme care to avoid disturbing the butterflies.

 Professor Jan van Leugenaarsdorp of San Serriffe University said,"It
seems there really were bigfoot creatures around until at least 2000
years ago and it does appear they were monarch watchers."

Neil Jones neil@...

1st April 2022






 


Remarkable news!

Neil Jones
 

The delay in reporting the figures for the size of the Mexican monarch overwintering colonies has been explained today in a remarkable revelation.

The results of a top secret research project have finally been revealed to the public. The findings have caused ripples of excitement across the scientific community. A research group of paleontologists has been working in the area of the colonies and they have made some remarkable finds.

Subfossil bones dating back to around only 2 millennia ago have been unearthed from the nearby forest. Detailed examination by experts has shown they belong to an giant species of ape. The ape named Gigantopithecus epimenides by experts is believed to be an extinct 10 foot tall orangutan which lived swinging from the trees in the oyalmel forests.

Work on excavating the bones delayed the counting work but it was done with extreme care to avoid disturbing the butterflies.

 Professor Jan van Leugenaarsdorp of San Serriffe University said,"It seems there really were bigfoot creatures around until at least 2000 years ago and it does appear they were monarch watchers."

Neil Jones neil@...

1st April 2022


Re: Lower Deschutes

Barbara Peck
 

 Very nice, Dennis. 

Barbara Peck,

On Mar 27, 2022, at 1:03 PM, tlpyle@... wrote:

Great early array, Dennis--good going!
First swallow and first robin-song here today, so I reckon butterlies can't be far behind.
Hope to visit canyons in E. Klickitat in about three weeks in search of Phyciodes pallida.
Bob Pyle

On Sun, March 27, 2022 2:40 am, Dennis Deck wrote:
With the warm temperatures reaching about 69 today I ran over to the
Lower Deschutes (the BLM road below Sherars Falls) to see what was
flying.
An early desert parsley was in full bloom but not much else. However
i did see more butterflies than expected:
Anise Swallowtail
Indra Swallowtail
Julia Orangetip
Becker's White
Cabbage White
Silvery Blue
Sheridan Green Hairstreak
Gray Hairstreak
Mylitta Crescent
Satyr Comma
Mourning Cloak


Dennis Deck
dennis.d.deck@...




 

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