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HEALTH : PUBLIC HEALTH : STATISTICS : DATA : WORLD : PUBICATIONS : ORGANIZATIONS: NAMED ORGANIZATIONS: WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION: World Health Statistics 2014

David P. Dillard
 

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HEALTH :

PUBLIC HEALTH :

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World Health Statistics 2014

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Media centre

World Health Statistics 2014

World Health Organization

Large gains in life expectancy

News release

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/ 2014/world-health-statistics-2014/en/

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A shorter URL for the above link:

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http://tinyurl.com/qx4vs9x


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News Release Excerpt

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" 15 May 2014 | GENEVA - People everywhere are living longer, according to the "World Health Statistics 2014" published today by WHO. Based on global averages, a girl who was born in 2012 can expect to live to around 73 years, and a boy to the age of 68. This is six years longer than the average global life expectancy for a child born in 1990.

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WHOs annual statistics report shows that low-income countries have made the greatest progress, with an average increase in life expectancy by 9 years from 1990 to 2012. The top six countries where life expectancy increased the most were Liberia which saw a 20-year increase (from 42 years in 1990 to 62 years in 2012) followed by Ethiopia (from 45 to 64 years), Maldives (58 to 77 years), Cambodia (54 to 72 years), Timor-Leste (50 to 66 years) and Rwanda (48 to 65 years).

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An important reason why global life expectancy has improved so much is that fewer children are dying before their fifth birthday, says Dr Margaret Chan, WHO Director-General. But there is still a major rich-poor divide: people in high-income countries continue to have a much better chance of living longer than people in low-income countries.
Gaps between rich and poor countries

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A boy born in 2012 in a high-income country can expect to live to the age of around 76 16 years longer than a boy born in a low-income country (age 60). For girls, the difference is even wider; a gap of 19 years separates life expectancy in high-income (82 years) and low-income countries (63 years).

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Wherever they live in the world, women live longer than men. The gap between male and female life expectancy is greater in high-income countries where women live around six years longer than men. In low-income countries, the difference is around three years.

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Women in Japan have the longest life expectancy in the world at 87 years, followed by Spain, Switzerland and Singapore. Female life expectancy in all the top 10 countries was 84 years or longer. Life expectancy among men is 80 years or more in nine countries, with the longest male life expectancy in Iceland, Switzerland and Australia.

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In high-income countries, much of the gain in life expectancy is due to success in tackling noncommunicable diseases, says Dr Ties Boerma, Director of the Department of Health Statistics and Information Systems at WHO. Fewer men and women are dying before they get to their 60th birthday from heart disease and stroke. Richer countries have become better at monitoring and managing high blood pressure for example.

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Declining tobacco use is also a key factor in helping people live longer in several countries.

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At the other end of the scale, life expectancy for both men and women is still less than 55 years in nine sub-Saharan African countries Angola, Central African Republic, Chad, Ce dIvoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Lesotho, Mozambique, Nigeria and Sierra Leone."

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World Health Statistics 2014
Full Report (PDF)

http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/ 112738/1/9789240692671_eng.pdf?ua=1

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A shorter URL for the above link:

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http://tinyurl.com/ml22k7o

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Table of Contents

Abbreviations

Introduction

Part I. Health-related Millennium Development Goals

Summary of status and trends

Regional and country charts

1.
AARD (%) in under-five mortality rate, 19902012

2.
Measles immunization coverage among 1-year-olds (%)

3.
AARD (%) in maternal mortality ratio, 19902013

4.
Births attended by skilled health personnel (%)

5.
Antenatal care coverage (%): at least one visit and at least four visits

6.
Unmet need for family planning (%)

7.
AARD (%) in HIV prevalence, 20012012

8.
Antiretroviral therapy coverage among people eligible for treatment (%)

9.
Children aged <
5 years sleeping under insecticide-treated nets (%)

10.
Children aged <
5 years with fever who received treatment with any antimalarial (%)

11.
AARD (%) in tuberculosis mortality rate, 19902012

12.
AARD (%) in proportion of population without access to improved drinking-water sources

13.
AARD (%) in proportion of population without access to improved sanitation

Part II. Highlighted topics

Putting an ending to preventable maternal mortality the next steps

Rising childhood obesity time to act

Life expectancy in the world in 2012

Years of life lost due to premature mortality trends and causes

Civil registration and vital statistics
the key to national and global advancement

Part III. Global health indicators

General notes

1. Life expectancy and mortality

Life expectancy at birth (years)

Life expectancy at age 60 (years)

Healthy life expectancy at birth (years)

Neonatal mortality rate (per 1000 live births)

Infant mortality rate (probability of dying by age 1 per 1000 live births)

Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births)

Adult mortality rate (probability of dying between 15 and 60 years of age per 1000 population)

2. Cause-specific mortality and morbidity

Mortality

Age-standardized mortality rates by cause (per 100 000 population)
Years of life lost (per 100 000 population)

Number of deaths among children aged <
years (000s)

Distribution of causes of death among children aged <
5 years (%)

Maternal mortality ratio (per 100 000 live births)

Cause-specific mortality rate (per 100 000 population)

Morbidity

Incidence rate (per 100 000 population)

Prevalence (per 100 000 population)

3. Selected infectious diseases

Cholera
Diphtheria
Human African trypanosomiasis
Japanese encephalitis
Leishmaniasis
Leprosy
Malaria
Measles
Meningitis
Mumps
Pertussis
Poliomyelitis
Congenital rubella syndrome
Rubella
Neonatal tetanus
Total tetanus
Tuberculosis
Yellow fever

4. Health service coverage

Unmet need for family planning (%)

Contraceptive prevalence (%)

Antenatal care coverage (%)

Births attended by skilled health personnel (%)

Births by caesarean section (%)

Postnatal care visit within two days of childbirth (%)

Neonates protected at birth against neonatal tetanus (%)

Immunization coverage among 1-year-olds (%)

Children aged 6-59 months who received vitamin A supplementation (%)
Children aged <

5 years with ARI symptoms taken to a health facility (%)
Children aged <

5 years with suspected pneumonia receiving antibiotics (%)
Children aged <

5 years with diarrhoea receiving ORT (ORS and/or RHF) (%)
Children aged <

5 years sleeping under insecticide-treated nets (%)
Children aged <

5 years with fever who received treatment with any antimalarial (%)

Pregnant women with HIV receiving antiretrovirals to prevent MTCT (%)

Antiretroviral therapy coverage among people eligible for treatment (%)

Case-detection rate for all forms of tuberculosis (%)

Treatment-success rate for smear-positive tuberculosis (%)

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5. Risk factors

Population using improved drinking-water sources (%)

Population using improved sanitation (%)

Population using solid fuels (%)

Preterm birth rate (per 100 live births)

Infants exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months of life (%)
Children aged <

5 years who are wasted (%)
Children aged <

5 years who are stunted (%)
Children aged <

5 years who are underweight (%)
Children aged <

5 years who are overweight (%)

Prevalence of raised fasting blood glucose among adults aged ?
25 years (%)

Prevalence of raised blood pressure among adults aged ?
25 years (%)

Adults aged ?

20 years who are obese (%)

Alcohol consumption among adults aged ?

15 years (litres of pure alcohol per person per year)

Prevalence of smoking any tobacco product among adults aged ?
15 years (%)

Prevalence of current tobacco use among adolescents aged 13-15 years (%)

Prevalence of condom use by adults aged 15-49 years during higher-risk sex (%)

Population aged 15-24 years with comprehensive correct knowledge of HIV/AIDS (%)

6. Health systems

Health workforce

Density of physicians per 10
000 population

Density of nursing and midwifery personnel per 10
000 population

Density of dentistry personnel per 10
000 population

Density of pharmaceutical personnel per 10
000 population

Density of psychiatrists per 10
000 population

Infrastructure and technologies

Hospitals (per 10
000 population)

Hospital beds (per 10
000 population)

Psychiatric beds (per 10
000 population)

Computed tomography units (per million population)

Radiotherapy units (per million population)

Mammography units (per million females aged 50-69 years)
Essential medicines

Median availability of selected generic medicines in public and private sectors (%)

Median consumer price ratio of selected generic medicines in public and private sectors

7. Health expenditure

Health expenditure ratios

Total expenditure on health as a percentage of gross domestic product

General government expenditure on health as a percentage of total expenditure on health

Private expenditure on health as a percentage of total expenditure on health

General government expenditure on health as a percentage of total government expenditure

External resources for health as a percentage of total expenditure on health

Social security expenditure on health as a percentage of general government expenditure on health

Out-of-pocket expenditure as a percentage of private expenditure on health

Private prepaid plans as a percentage of private expenditure on health

Per capita health expenditures

Per capita total expenditure on health at average exchange rate (US$)

Per capita total expenditure on health (PPP int. $)

Per capita government expenditure on health at average exchange rate (US$)

Per capita government expenditure on health (PPP int. $)

8. Health inequities

Contraceptive prevalence: modern methods (%)

Antenatal care coverage: at least four visits (%)

Births attended by skilled health personnel (%)

DTP3 immunization coverage among 1-year-olds (%)
Children aged <

5 years who are stunted (%)

Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births)

9. Demographic and socioeconomic statistics

Total population (000s)

Median age of population (years)
Population aged <

15 years (%)
Population aged >

60 years (%)

Annual population growth rate (%)

Population living in urban areas (%)

Civil registration coverage (%) of births and causes of death

Crude birth rate (per 1000 population)

Crude death rate (per 1000 population)

Total fertility rate (per woman)

Adolescent fertility rate (per 1000 girls aged 15-19 years)

Literacy rate among adults aged ?
15 years (%)

Net primary school enrolment rate (%)

Gross national income per capita (PPP int. $)
Population living on <

$1 (PPP int. $) a day (%)

Cellular phone subscribers (per 100 population)

Annex 1. Regional and income groupings

WHO regional groupings

Income groupings


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