Date   

First aurora QSO

G8JBJ John
 

Hi all,


It’s nice to have firsts!

 

Yesterday afternoon the planetary K index (https://www.swpc.noaa.gov/products/planetary-k-index) rose from a dormant Kp=1 to a healthy Kp=7. Kp characterises geomagnetic  storms.

 

In parallel, the aurora-predicting geomagnetic disturbance level went from green to amber and then red, breaching the 200nT threshold at about 15:30 UTC (https://aurorawatch.lancs.ac.uk/plots/?project=awn&site=sum&date=2021-05-12). 

 

So, I turned the newly installed 6 metre Yagi north. And there was a radio aurora in full swing with MM5DWW on Orkney working the world – or at least those north of 55 degrees. We exchanged 5/7 both ways and went on our way – him to work yet more, and me to listen to a couple of CW stations. There were also some ethereal voices that might – or might not – have been other SSB stations.


My Great Circle distance to Orkney is 400km, but the actual path length will have been significantly more to the scattering medium further north and back to Orkney. In an aurora, all stations generally beam north.

 

The radio aurora was gone by 16:30 and 6 metres reverted to its normal flat state.

 

I’d heard radio auroras as a teenager but never had the necessary kit to work them, so it was good to tick that box. I’ve now got a feeder run and Yagi to install for 2 metres, so next time I’ll be able to compare the bands. 

 

And next time I’ll remember to record the activity. The voices are heavily distorted by the Doppler shift caused by the movement of the free electrons in the auroral columns doing the reflecting. You’ve to listen hard. There’s no time for exchange of pleasantries.


Radio auroras are infrequent. Sometimes, they are intense enough and at a low enough latitude to support southern stations. If you're interested, install the AuroraWatch and SpaceWeatherLive apps.


Regards,


John, GM8JBJ



 

John Berry


Mob. 07553 250 919
Willowburn, Kirkton, Hawick, Scottish Borders, TD9 8QJ


Re: IET lecture 'To the other side of the world and beyond' Wednesday 12 May

M0TPJ Terry
 

Hi Phil,

Think they have corrected it! My booking acceptance actually quotes 7.30 p.m.

Cheers

Terry
M0TPJ


-----Original Message-----
From: M5BTB Phil via groups.io <philjbrown1@...>
To: Msars <msars@groups.io>
Sent: Tue, 11 May 2021 19:00
Subject: [Msars] IET lecture 'To the other side of the world and beyond' Wednesday 12 May

If you intend to view this lecture which covers some aspects of amateur radio, please note that the advertised start time of 8:30pm may be wrong. 7:30pm is more believable. You may only view the Q&A session if you keep to 8:30pm. I have been caught out by this IET timing error before, possibly computer generated. 

M5BTB


IET lecture 'To the other side of the world and beyond' Wednesday 12 May

M5BTB Phil
 

If you intend to view this lecture which covers some aspects of amateur radio, please note that the advertised start time of 8:30pm may be wrong. 7:30pm is more believable. You may only view the Q&A session if you keep to 8:30pm. I have been caught out by this IET timing error before, possibly computer generated. 

M5BTB


Mills on the Air

M0XYF Berni
 

As I learned on the Friday night GB3HY net this evening, it's Mills on the Air weekend!

You can read all about it here: https://msars.org.uk/news/69-mills-on-the-air-weekend-may-8th-9th-2021

Berni M0XYF


Re: F1

M5BTB Phil
 

Berni

Very interesting. 

In my earlier days in hobby radio, I dreamt of having a ground based system for receiving terrestrial foreign TV. My satellite receiver conglomeration is now more than enough to view foreign channels. G3XQM had helped me to get started.

I have only a dual lnb (13 and 19 deg.) with 4 outputs. My collection of 4 satellite receivers is used for receiving mainly French broadcasts. Two are free to view, and the others are TNT (bought via French Amazon).

The TNT card lasts for 4 years, best to buy a new cheap STB with card, as a card by itself is expensive. 

My main viewing free to view STB is a Zgemma H9 Twin on Linux Enigma2, unfortunately an unreliable item. But it has a usable EPG. 

I find that France2 (TNT) has a good selection of sports programmes that could be interesting for British eyes.

Hope to trade STB experiences when we are physically back together again.

Phil
M5BTB


On Sun, 2 May 2021, 13:47 M0XYF Berni, <msars@...> wrote:
Nice one Phil. There are tons of TV-watching opportunities out there if
that's something that interests people.

Many foreign channels that used to be 'Free To Air' are now encrypted,
and analogue satellite broadcasts have now disappeared in favour of the
much more spectrum-friendly digital alternatives. BTW 'Free To View' is
not the same as 'Free To Air'. Most 'European' transmissions are
available in the UK (though many are encrypted) but there are still a
number of good freebies. Football is generally harder to get (forget
trying to watch the Premier League unless you are VERY committed), but
if you can speak or want to learn French and/or German in particular,
there is plenty to watch and all completely legally. If free and
unencrypted stuff is falling out of the sky into my back garden, then
I'm claiming it.

Trying to 'sync' a video feed and a DIFFERENT audio feed can be
extremely frustrating, as many audio sources are not based on the same
live video feed that you can watch from commercial broadcasters (they
often use different 'feed' downlinks or are delayed by satellite to IP
conversion/encryption/decryption). Some satellite video feeds also go
through more than one uplink/downlink cycle, in much the same way as
multi-hop ionospheric propagation therefore introducing re-transmission
delays.

Circumventing geo-fencing using a VPN is also easy, though maybe
slightly less ethical. TV rights are a funny thing. When we were in the
'good old' EU, there were supposedly no internal barriers for people,
goods or services etc. yet infuriatingly rights to sporting events,
movies etc. were/are still sold on a national, regional or platform
basis - even though satellite downlink footprints and terrestrial
broadcasts (for example) know no such boundaries. Those same commercial
entities can be viewed as slightly more justified in their stance now
that we are no longer members.

I routinely use multiple VPN's. I can recommend NordVPN for general use.
Make sure you get one of their (very, very regular) 'deals'. Great for
windows, but no GUI client for Linux. My favourite however is Torguard,
which has a neat and very simple 'click to install' client and DOES have
a Linux version with a GUI. It's also incredibly good value when you
apply the bargain discount code 'TGLifetime50' for a lifetime 50%
discount. IIRC it works out at around £24 a year and allows you to
access pretty much anything from anywhere. I'm not particularly
interested in accessing foreign IP video streams - I have all this
security purely for privacy reasons.

TOR is also an option, but bandwidth is often insufficient for reliable
video streaming. TOR is more suited to covert ops and darkweb access.

If anyone wants any more info on any of this, you can contact me too. I
have multiple large/motorised dishes and can arrange transcoding from my
Enigma2 Linux STB for testing if required.

If you're just interested in finding out what's available from satellite
broadcast (TV and radio) I can recommend https://www.lyngsat.com which
also has a link to 'just the free stuff' as well as fascinating maps for
each transponder downlink footprint at each satellite for each orbital
location.

Berni M0XYF







Re: F1

M0XYF Berni
 

Nice one Phil. There are tons of TV-watching opportunities out there if that's something that interests people.

Many foreign channels that used to be 'Free To Air' are now encrypted, and analogue satellite broadcasts have now disappeared in favour of the much more spectrum-friendly digital alternatives. BTW 'Free To View' is not the same as 'Free To Air'. Most 'European' transmissions are available in the UK (though many are encrypted) but there are still a number of good freebies. Football is generally harder to get (forget trying to watch the Premier League unless you are VERY committed), but if you can speak or want to learn French and/or German in particular, there is plenty to watch and all completely legally. If free and unencrypted stuff is falling out of the sky into my back garden, then I'm claiming it.

Trying to 'sync' a video feed and a DIFFERENT audio feed can be extremely frustrating, as many audio sources are not based on the same live video feed that you can watch from commercial broadcasters (they often use different 'feed' downlinks or are delayed by satellite to IP conversion/encryption/decryption). Some satellite video feeds also go through more than one uplink/downlink cycle, in much the same way as multi-hop ionospheric propagation therefore introducing re-transmission delays.

Circumventing geo-fencing using a VPN is also easy, though maybe slightly less ethical. TV rights are a funny thing. When we were in the 'good old' EU, there were supposedly no internal barriers for people, goods or services etc. yet infuriatingly rights to sporting events, movies etc. were/are still sold on a national, regional or platform basis - even though satellite downlink footprints and terrestrial broadcasts (for example) know no such boundaries. Those same commercial entities can be viewed as slightly more justified in their stance now that we are no longer members.

I routinely use multiple VPN's. I can recommend NordVPN for general use. Make sure you get one of their (very, very regular) 'deals'. Great for windows, but no GUI client for Linux. My favourite however is Torguard, which has a neat and very simple 'click to install' client and DOES have a Linux version with a GUI. It's also incredibly good value when you apply the bargain discount code 'TGLifetime50' for a lifetime 50% discount. IIRC it works out at around £24 a year and allows you to access pretty much anything from anywhere. I'm not particularly interested in accessing foreign IP video streams - I have all this security purely for privacy reasons.

TOR is also an option, but bandwidth is often insufficient for reliable video streaming. TOR is more suited to covert ops and darkweb access.

If anyone wants any more info on any of this, you can contact me too. I have multiple large/motorised dishes and can arrange transcoding from my Enigma2 Linux STB for testing if required.

If you're just interested in finding out what's available from satellite broadcast (TV and radio) I can recommend https://www.lyngsat.com which also has a link to 'just the free stuff' as well as fascinating maps for each transponder downlink footprint at each satellite for each orbital location.

Berni M0XYF


F1

G4UDU Phil
 

Formula One

In the good old days we watched Formula One on BBC 1  with no advertisement breaks and Murray Walker giving us a fantastic commentary - sadly that is no more.

First it went to ITV followed by CH4  who infuriated everyone with all the advertisements at peak moments of the race and then the Formula One organisation sold out on TV rights to SKY and now unless you pay for a sky sports or a sky sports F1 subscription you can't watch anything live. - apart from Silverstone but you still get the adverts !

There are various questionable devices that allow you to circumnavigate subscriptions none of which I am particularly interested in using - other opinions may vary.

But in central Europe they have Formula One available to all live !

RTL screen on the Astra One Satellite at 19 deg E - so that is one way - commentary is in German but the same video feed is used for the world 

I believe this is also avaiable as a live web screening - just like our BBC feeds, Five Live etc. - BUT when you log onto their webpage your IP address will reveal that you are an alien outside of the mainland EU and therefore not a local TV viewer - so no TV for you !

For this there is an answer, just use a VPN and then you can log into the country without any problem and view live

So the next thing is your understanding of German or French or whatever language they are using for the commentary is not understood - answer, tune into "BBC Five Sports Live"  on the radio and listen to an English commentary that actually monitors the same video feed

Here is an Austrian TV web service


There are more I am sure - but I used this one yesterday and watched qualifying live 

When away in the MH with our sat dish I use the RTL



Questions:-  

If it is about how to get the satellite direct reception I can help you.

If it is about setting up a VPN on your specific computer there are IT experts amongst the Club who probably have a better knowledge than I do - suggestions please ………..



3pm local time today Portugal F1


Phil G4UDU








IET Events 12 May

M5BTB Phil
 

https://events.theiet.org/events/to-the-other-side-of-the-world-and-beyond/


This IET webinar is available to non-members, registration is straight forward. The webinar deals with the appreciation of amateur radio, use of amateur radio satellites and how to contact the International Space Station. 

Phil Brown
M5BTB

PS. You are warned this might start an hour early, due to IET time problems.



...and now, for something completely different...

M0XYF Berni
 

The eagle-eyed amongst you may have spotted a couple of new logos in the footer of the website.

Welcome to the new MSARS Twitter feed and Youtube channel!

Yeah, OK - try and contain your excitement. It's really just to provide 'backlinks' to the website to help improve its visibility, but should any of you come over a bit tweety or uncover any videos that we could post (that aren't already on the website) then please let me know.

Also, great to see Thomas M7BQI on Zoom this evening, and congratulations on your loft-mounted homebrew J-pole. It's working a treat. If you get a moment, send me a picture and a description. It's just the sort of thing that other new amateurs would be interested in seeing.

Berni M0XYF


Create your own MSARS website content!

M0XYF Berni
 

Hi folks.

I hinted at this a couple of weeks ago, but have only just got around to finishing the mini-tutorial. Apologies for that.

Both the website and the tutorial are now ready to receive your attention, so please have a look if this is something that interests you.

You can read the tutorial here: https://msars.org.uk/index/32-joomla/61-create-your-own-msars-content

There is loads of content I would like to get up on the website - including things that several members have already offered up as potential articles. If you don't want to post them yourself, then please email them to me and I'll load them up for you.

On a different note, I was rummaging around on t'Internet the other day, and I happened across a local company called  RF Solutions. Now, please forgive me if you all know about this place, but it was news to me so I thought I'd mention it. It's based in Burgess Hill, located just opposite T L Carr near the Premier Inn, and they have loads of reasonably priced radio gear, including LORA modules, WiFi components, a GPS receiver module for £2.50, and loads of 433MHz hardware like an AM transmitter module for £2.43 and several superhet receiver modules for around a fiver. You can collect too, free of charge. Like I said, you probably already know, or your mum works there or something...

https://www.rfsolutions.co.uk

I have no connection or affiliation with this company. Just thought it might be of interest.

Berni M0XYF


Re: QRZ updates

G1TDL Mike
 

Yes. I believe that mail for organisations is placed on the shelf just inside the main door.

/\/\ike
The Homestead
Burgess Hill
RH15 0RQ

On 5 Apr 2021, at 12:43, M0XYF Berni <msars@mailfeeder.co.uk> wrote:

Hi Mike.

Does that mean we can use the Cyprus Hall address as the official mailing address for the club? If so, I will update our main website which at the moment just says "Please Do Not use this address for mail" WRT Cyprus hall address...

On 05/04/2021 12:29, G1TDL Mike wrote:
Hi Chris, Yes, a letter box has been installed by the front door.

/\/\ike
The Homestead
Burgess Hill
RH15 0RQ

On 5 Apr 2021, at 10:55, G4ZCS Chris via groups.io <c_saunders=tiscali.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bernie
Some time back we had a problem with incoming post.
It appeared that Cyprus Hall doesn’t have a letter box!
Worth checking to see if there is one now?

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: Msars@groups.io On Behalf Of M0XYF Berni
Sent: 05 April 2021 00:05
To: Msars@groups.io
Subject: [Msars] QRZ updates

Thanks to Adrian (I believe) for performing all those QRZ updates. Quite a few changes required there, but everything now looks great. I guess the physical mailing address for the club will be resolved once we finally have our AGM and the committee is elected, but the hall address is the only real option until that happens.

Apologies for the lack of Zoom meetings last week, I just had a lot of mundane stuff to catch up with. Normal service will be resumed this week. Hope you're all having a good Easter holiday!

Berni M0XYF







--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com











QRZ updates & club official mailing address

M0XYF Berni
 

OK, Stella has asked if we can set the QRZ pages' postal addresses to her address, as she is the QSL manager (I did not know that, sorry! I have updated our website to reflect that fact) and can someone who knows what's going on with a general mailing address for the club please let me know what address to put on our own website, or I'll just have to leave it as is with no address at all.

Thanks!

Berni


Re: QRZ updates

M0XYF Berni
 

Hi Mike.

Does that mean we can use the Cyprus Hall address as the official mailing address for the club? If so, I will update our main website which at the moment just says "Please Do Not use this address for mail" WRT Cyprus hall address...

On 05/04/2021 12:29, G1TDL Mike wrote:
Hi Chris, Yes, a letter box has been installed by the front door.

/\/\ike
The Homestead
Burgess Hill
RH15 0RQ

On 5 Apr 2021, at 10:55, G4ZCS Chris via groups.io <c_saunders=tiscali.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:

Hi Bernie
Some time back we had a problem with incoming post.
It appeared that Cyprus Hall doesn’t have a letter box!
Worth checking to see if there is one now?

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: Msars@groups.io On Behalf Of M0XYF Berni
Sent: 05 April 2021 00:05
To: Msars@groups.io
Subject: [Msars] QRZ updates

Thanks to Adrian (I believe) for performing all those QRZ updates. Quite a few changes required there, but everything now looks great. I guess the physical mailing address for the club will be resolved once we finally have our AGM and the committee is elected, but the hall address is the only real option until that happens.

Apologies for the lack of Zoom meetings last week, I just had a lot of mundane stuff to catch up with. Normal service will be resumed this week. Hope you're all having a good Easter holiday!

Berni M0XYF







--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com








Re: QRZ updates

G1TDL Mike
 

Hi Chris, Yes, a letter box has been installed by the front door.

/\/\ike
The Homestead
Burgess Hill
RH15 0RQ

On 5 Apr 2021, at 10:55, G4ZCS Chris via groups.io <c_saunders=tiscali.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:

Hi Bernie
Some time back we had a problem with incoming post.
It appeared that Cyprus Hall doesn’t have a letter box!
Worth checking to see if there is one now?

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: Msars@groups.io On Behalf Of M0XYF Berni
Sent: 05 April 2021 00:05
To: Msars@groups.io
Subject: [Msars] QRZ updates

Thanks to Adrian (I believe) for performing all those QRZ updates. Quite a few changes required there, but everything now looks great. I guess the physical mailing address for the club will be resolved once we finally have our AGM and the committee is elected, but the hall address is the only real option until that happens.

Apologies for the lack of Zoom meetings last week, I just had a lot of mundane stuff to catch up with. Normal service will be resumed this week. Hope you're all having a good Easter holiday!

Berni M0XYF







--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com






Re: QRZ updates

M0XYF Berni
 

I imagine that's true Chris, so for cards & mail, it's not ideal - but I guess nobody is using any of our callsigns at the moment? The postal address was Sue's but of course that's now no longer applicable. If the committee want to come up with a temporary c/o address, then we could use that, or just wait until the AGM when the backlog of housekeeping can be addressed? I haven't heard anything, but I guess an AGM or an EGM will be fairly high on the priority list once it can be facilitated.

Failing that, I could pop down to Cyprus Hall with a circular saw!

Berni M0XYF

On 05/04/2021 10:55, G4ZCS Chris via groups.io wrote:
Hi Bernie
Some time back we had a problem with incoming post.
It appeared that Cyprus Hall doesn’t have a letter box!
Worth checking to see if there is one now?

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: Msars@groups.io On Behalf Of M0XYF Berni
Sent: 05 April 2021 00:05
To: Msars@groups.io
Subject: [Msars] QRZ updates

Thanks to Adrian (I believe) for performing all those QRZ updates. Quite a few changes required there, but everything now looks great. I guess the physical mailing address for the club will be resolved once we finally have our AGM and the committee is elected, but the hall address is the only real option until that happens.

Apologies for the lack of Zoom meetings last week, I just had a lot of mundane stuff to catch up with. Normal service will be resumed this week. Hope you're all having a good Easter holiday!

Berni M0XYF







--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com





Re: QRZ updates

G4ZCS Chris
 

Hi Bernie
Some time back we had a problem with incoming post.
It appeared that Cyprus Hall doesn’t have a letter box!
Worth checking to see if there is one now?

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: Msars@groups.io On Behalf Of M0XYF Berni
Sent: 05 April 2021 00:05
To: Msars@groups.io
Subject: [Msars] QRZ updates

Thanks to Adrian (I believe) for performing all those QRZ updates. Quite a few changes required there, but everything now looks great. I guess the physical mailing address for the club will be resolved once we finally have our AGM and the committee is elected, but the hall address is the only real option until that happens.

Apologies for the lack of Zoom meetings last week, I just had a lot of mundane stuff to catch up with. Normal service will be resumed this week. Hope you're all having a good Easter holiday!

Berni M0XYF







--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: QRZ updates

G3WYN Ken
 

Bernie, Thanks for all your doing to bring the Website up to date. There is one error however which requires changing in that the MSARS lunchtime net is shown as being on 14.330 and not where it really is on 14.345. The shift in frequency took place a month or so back due to QRM on 14.330.  I've left a message on Adrian M0TCD's phone and asked him to effect the change but if this is wrong please attend to it as soon as you can. Tks agn, es 73's Ken

On 05/04/2021 00:04, M0XYF Berni wrote:
Thanks to Adrian (I believe) for performing all those QRZ updates. Quite a few changes required there, but everything now looks great. I guess the physical mailing address for the club will be resolved once we finally have our AGM and the committee is elected, but the hall address is the only real option until that happens.

Apologies for the lack of Zoom meetings last week, I just had a lot of mundane stuff to catch up with. Normal service will be resumed this week. Hope you're all having a good Easter holiday!

Berni M0XYF





QRZ updates

M0XYF Berni
 

Thanks to Adrian (I believe) for performing all those QRZ updates. Quite a few changes required there, but everything now looks great. I guess the physical mailing address for the club will be resolved once we finally have our AGM and the committee is elected, but the hall address is the only real option until that happens.

Apologies for the lack of Zoom meetings last week, I just had a lot of mundane stuff to catch up with. Normal service will be resumed this week. Hope you're all having a good Easter holiday!

Berni M0XYF


Lost Walkie talkie

G1TDL Mike
 


From: <wg@...>
Date: 3 April 2021 at 19:38:08 BST

Cc: <antoniamg@...>
Subject: FW: Lost Walkie talkie

My niece has lost her ‘walkie-talkie’ in one of our woods.

 

Is there any device/way of sending a signal that one could pick up if standing reasonably close.

 

I am thinking that if one telephoned a lost mobile, the number would ring out and, if standing close by, one might ‘echo locate’ it?

 

Your thoughts, please?

 

Would anyone in the Club have an idea?

 

Regards,

 

William

 

From: Antonia Boulsien [mailto:antoniamg@...]
Sent: 03 April 2021 17:28
To: UNCLE William <wg@...>
Subject: Re: Lost Walkie talkie

 

Photo attached



On 3 Apr 2021, at 17:27, Antonia Boulsien <antoniamg@...> wrote:

Hi,

If by some miracle you or your friends come across a walkie-talkie lying around somewhere in Buckbridge Wood, then it’s ours! See attached a photo for reference. I suspect it is lost forever, but you never know...

Love Monie x


Re: Car Radio

G3XQM Tony
 

Brilliant Mike


From: Msars@groups.io <Msars@groups.io> on behalf of G1TDL Mike <mike@...>
Sent: 30 March 2021 19:09
To: Msars@groups.io <Msars@groups.io>
Subject: [Msars] Car Radio
 
HISTORY OF

THE CAR RADIO

Seems as if cars have always had radios,

but they didn't.

Here's the story:

One evening, in 1929,

two young men named

William Lear and Elmer Wavering
drove their girlfriends to a lookout point high above the

Mississippi River town of Quincy, Illinois, to watch the sunset.

It was a romantic night to be sure,

but one of the women observed that
it would be even nicer if they could listen to music in the car.

Lear and Wavering liked the idea. Both men had tinkered with radios (Lear served as a radio operator in

the US. Navy during World War I)

and it wasn't long before they were
taking apart a home radio and

trying to get it to work in a car.

But it wasn't easy: automobiles have ignition switches, generators, spark plugs, and other electrical

equipment that generate noisy static interference, making it nearly impossible to listen to the radio when the engine was running.

One by one, Lear and Wavering identified and eliminated each source of electrical interference. When they finally got their radio to work, they took it to a radio convention

in Chicago.

There they met Paul Galvin , owner of
Galvin Manufacturing Corporation.

He made a product called a

"battery eliminator", a device that allowed battery-powered radios to

run on household AC current.

But as more homes were wired for electricity, more radio manufacturers made AC-powered radios.

Galvin needed a new product to manufacture. When he met Lear and Wavering at the radio convention,

he found it. He believed that
mass-produced, affordable car

radios had the potential to become

a huge business.

Lear and Wavering set up shop inGalvin's factory, and when they perfected their first radio, they installed it in his Studebaker.

Then Galvin went to a local banker

to apply for a loan. Thinking it

might sweeten the deal,

he had his men install a radio in

the banker's Packard.

Good idea, but it didn't work –

Half an hour after the installation,

the banker's Packard caught on fire. (They didn't get the loan.)

Galvin didn't give up.

He drove his Studebaker nearly

800 miles to Atlantic City to show

off the radio at the

1930 Radio Manufacturers

Association convention.

Too broke to afford a booth, he parked the car outside the convention hall and cranked up the radio so that
passing conventioneers could hear it.

That idea worked -- He got enough orders to put the radio into production.

WHAT'S IN A NAME

That first production model was

called the 5T71.

Galvin decided he needed to come up with something a little catchier.

In those days many companies in the phonograph and radio businesses used the suffix "ola" for their names -
Radiola, Columbiola, and Victrola

were three of the biggest.

Galvin decided to do the same thing, and since his radio was intended for use in a motor vehicle, he decided to call it theMotorola.

But even with the name change,

the radio still had problems:

When Motorola went on sale in 1930, it cost about $110 uninstalled, at a time when you could buy a brand-new car for $650, and the country was sliding into the Great Depression.

(By that measure, a radio for a new car would cost about $3,000 today.)

In 1930, it took two men several days

to put in a car radio --

The dashboard had to be taken

apart so that the receiver and a

single speaker could be installed,

and the ceiling had to be cut open

to install the antenna.

These early radios ran on their own batteries, not on the car battery,

so holes had to be cut into the floorboard to accommodate them.

The installation manual had eight complete diagrams and 28 pages of instructions Selling complicated car
radios that cost 20 percent of the

price of a brand-new car wouldn't

have been easy in the best of
times, let alone during the Great Depression –

Galvin lost money in 1930 and struggled for a couple of years after that. But things picked up in 1933 when Ford began offering Motorola's pre-installed at the factory.

In 1934 they got another boost when
Galvin struck a deal with

B.F. Goodrich tire company
to sell and install them in its chain

of tire stores.

By then the price of the radio, with installation included, had dropped to $55. The Motorola car radio was off and running

(The name of the company would be officially changed from

Galvin Manufacturing to

"Motorola" in 1947.)

In the meantime, Galvin continued to develop new uses for car radios

In 1936, the same year that it introduced push-button tuning,

it also introduced the Motorola Police Cruiser, a standard car radio that was factory preset to a single frequency to pick up police broadcasts.

In 1940 he developed the first

handheld two-way radio

-- The Handy-Talkie –

for the U. S. Army.

A lot of the communications
technologies that we take for granted today were born in Motorola labs in the years that followed World War II.

In 1947 they came out with the first television for under $200.

In 1956 the company introduced the world's first pager; in 1969 came the radio and television equipment that was used to televise Neil Armstrong's first steps on the Moon.

In 1973 it invented the world's first handheld cellular phone.

Today Motorola is one of the largest cell phone manufacturers in the world.

And it all started with the car radio.

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO

the two men who installed the first radio in Paul Galvin's car?

Elmer Wavering and William Lear, ended up taking very different
paths in life

Wavering stayed with Motorola.

In the 1950's he helped change the automobile experience again when

he developed the first automotive
alternator, replacing inefficient and unreliable generators. The invention lead to such luxuries as power windows, power seats, and, eventually,
air-conditioning.

Lear also continued inventing.

He holds more than 150 patents. Remember eight-track tape players? Lear invented that.

But what he's really famous for are

his contributions to the field of aviation. He invented radio direction finders for planes, aided in the invention of the autopilot,

designed the first fully automatic
aircraft landing system,

and in 1963 introduced his
most famous invention of all,

the Lear Jet,

the world's first mass-produced, affordable business jet.

(Not bad for a guy who dropped out of school after the eighth grade.)

Sometimes it is fun to find out how some of the

many things that we take for granted actually

came into being!

AND It all started

with a woman's suggestion!

/\/\ike G1tdl


//ike
The Homestead
Burgess Hill
RH15 0RQ





1 - 20 of 213