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Re: #Resources Resources for Action Research and Mentoring #resources

Anastasiia Gubarenko
 

Thank you, dear Elizabeth, for sharing your experience and co-working with others!

I enjoyed reading your post. Really inspiring :)
Keep being tuned!
That's so precious that your mentees are so responsive, flexible and open-minded - the more, the better!

Cheers, 

Anastasiia


#Resources Resources for Action Research and Mentoring #resources

Elizabeth Bekes
 

Dear All, I just want to share with you the experience I had today with two of the three groups of teacher educators. Last week I asked them to read the first three chapters of the Handbook for Exploratory Action Research. In our meetings, several teachers said that they were pleasantly surprised about and very happy with the book. They had never thought teacher research can be explained in such straightforward and "non-threatening" manner. They said they were able to relate to the stories told by other teachers, the language was clear and concise; suddenly, they felt research did not appear to be so daunting. Since the manuscript of the Mentoring Handbook that Richard is sharing with us follows the philosophy, the topics and the layout of the EAR Handbook, it is an essential resource, not just for this "course", but for your future work with your mentees. If you only have time for one book, this should be it. (I am aware that many of you know it inside out, but still.) For mentoring, I found the Angi Malderez interview well-reasoned, informative and full of passion. As it happens, she was my British Council Summer School teacher in Exeter in 1983, and I only saw her again last year in Istanbul after about 35 years. The passion of that young lady has only grown, I can tell you :-) ...


Re: #week1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

Lidia Casalini
 

Hi Rozaith,
I completely agree. Differences in culture can turn into a barrier. 


Re: #week 1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

Ganesh shrestha
 

Hi everyone!
I am Ganesh Shrestha from Nepal.
A.  What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? / What do you think would be challenging? 
-In My case, teachers generally take other tasks except teaching according to their periods as an extra burden. So motivation for them is one of the big challenges. Next, developing culture of researching itself is another challenge.
B.How might you overcome these difficulties? And/or what advice can you give to others in these areas? 
- To overcome the problem, teachers must be aware of doing researches for effective classroom delivery and being resourceful. Using social network groups, we can unite teachers and motivate for it by sharing professional issues. By listening to teachers, helping and guiding them can be better way for enforcing  them.

Best regards
Ganesh Shrestha

 


Re: #week 1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

Suchita
 

Ravinarayan sir, 
I will try to give you an example of ready to use format. 
I was working on Lesson planning for classroom observation purposes for one of our projects. The teachers were worried as they don't want to write down a three page long plan. 
I provided them three stage format. 
1. Find and write down only two learning outcomes. 
2. Plan 3/4 activities. Mention the name of activity .
3. Evaluation activity. 

This served  the purpose well. They found it easy and lead them to focus more. 
Hope this would serve you informative. 
Regards 
Suchita 

On Wed, Jan 15, 2020, 12:36 Ravinarayan Chakrakodi <ravirie@...> wrote:
It's a great idea to provide short-length reading materials and also to give ready-to-use task formats. I'd appreciate if you could share some ready-to-use task formats; this will help.


Re: #week 1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

Ravinarayan Chakrakodi
 

Dear Maria
Many thanks for sharing these!


Re: #week 1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

Ravinarayan Chakrakodi
 

Dear Elizabeth
Yes, you are right. I recently presented a short paper in Hyderabad (AINET conference, India) on the challenges of doing AR in the classroom. 
As you rightly pointed out, classroom research should be voluntary in nature. So is PD! I am part of the  British Council's  Action Research Mentoring Scheme which is an excellent model for encouraging Teacher Research.


Re: #week 1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

Ravinarayan Chakrakodi
 

Yea, may be by relating the evidence that they have to their research questions. 


Re: #week1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

Ravinarayan Chakrakodi
 

Dear Richard
It's a good idea to share an overall structure and know where we are heading. Yes, it takes time to become autonomous and am trying to get some 'visible signs' that reveal their ability to research on their own.


Re: #week1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

Anastasiia Gubarenko
 

Hi Richard! Yes, it does make sense. Sure, as you organize them well. I do understand the issue with poor internet. Wish you to have no inet probs here at all!
I think resilience is the best trait ever on the way to autonomy, isn't it? Have a nice Thursday!


Re: #week1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

Richard Smith
 

Hi Anastasiia, since you've asked me a direct question I shall answer it! These days I'm mainly involved mentoring mentors, and the most challenging thing is (sometimes) communication, as I'm doing it at a distance, especially these days with colleagues in Nepal. I also worry if I contact them enough and sometimes there are problems with internet connection, so we have to be flexible. But they are very resilient, and I get joy from seeing them becoming more independent. I also think a vacuum is often filled if there's a good overall structure and people know basically where they're going - these days I don't interfere to control things as much as I used to, and I reckon that's what enables people to become more autonomous, less dependent. Does it make sense? 


Re: #week 1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

renu dhotre
 

I feel the most important challenge is to make them believe that they can do research. They have created a thought hurdle in their mind, which has to be replaced with the notion that classroom research is for the teachers facing issues in the classroom. Once that is achieved all other steps  become seemingly possible.


On Sat, Jan 11, 2020 at 10:43 PM, Richard Smith
<r.c.smith@...> wrote:

What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? / What do you think would be challenging? How might you overcome these difficulties? And/or what advice can you give to others in these areas? Please answer this question in any way you like, by replying to this message. 
You might like to consult the document 'Challenges' in the Files area as a stimulus to your own reflections.


Re: #week 1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

Elizabeth Bekes
 

Gary Barkhuizen also edited this book, my review might give you an idea about his wide-ranging interests as well as one of the focal points of his inquiry: language teacher identity...





On Wednesday, 15 January 2020, 15:35:09 GMT-5, Maria Marta Mora via Groups.Io <rodrimora1@...> wrote:


Sorry for the late reply! 
There's a video on YouTube where Gary Barkhuizen talks about the importance of stories in teacher research: IATEFL ReSIG International Conference - ISTANBUL 2018 DAY 1


I have also attached some material by Mr. Barkhuizen.

Regards,

Maria Marta Mora




El miércoles, 15 de enero de 2020 04:08:21 ART, Ravinarayan Chakrakodi <ravirie@...> escribió:


On Mon, Jan 13, 2020 at 11:39 AM, Maria Marta Mora wrote:
Dear Maria
Can you please share the link to the following material:
Gary Barkhuizen's work on qualitative data and narrative inquiry.


Re: #week 1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

Maria Marta Mora
 

Sorry for the late reply! 
There's a video on YouTube where Gary Barkhuizen talks about the importance of stories in teacher research: IATEFL ReSIG International Conference - ISTANBUL 2018 DAY 1


I have also attached some material by Mr. Barkhuizen.

Regards,

Maria Marta Mora




El miércoles, 15 de enero de 2020 04:08:21 ART, Ravinarayan Chakrakodi <ravirie@...> escribió:


On Mon, Jan 13, 2020 at 11:39 AM, Maria Marta Mora wrote:
Dear Maria
Can you please share the link to the following material:
Gary Barkhuizen's work on qualitative data and narrative inquiry.


Re: #Week1 ‘What are your experiences, hopes, expectations, plans, questions regarding mentoring teacher-research? #week1

syed irshadali
 

I, Syed Irshad Ali, a Post Graduate Teacher in English working at TS Model school and Govt. Jnr College, Pegadapally Jagtial District.
I am also a Digital Content Developer at SIET and State Resource person, module designer for In-service. teachers at SCERT Telangana Government., India.
I have more than 10 years of teaching experience
I have recently started Action research on Developing speaking skills among students.
I am also fortunate get an opportunity to mentor few teachers online as part of Developing English language Proficiency skills for Govt. Teachers in my state.
EXPECTATIONS:
My Expectations are certainly high as I want to learn share my experiences.As I am at the verge of research and mentoring I strongly feel this platform would help me as an individual in developing research skills.And I can help mentoring in correct direction through these sessions.
QUESTIONS:
1.How can I develop interest among teachers to research?
2. What are the other alternatives to get evidences of research?
3.Why can't a teacher relate his teaching to research?
4.How to create  Sustainability among teachers to research?



Re: #week 1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

syed irshadali
 

The most Challenging aspect is to motivate them in research and reflect. To develop interest among teachers to research. Most of the teachers are worried about syllabus.
If someone is interested they hardly get any support from colleagues and administration. Finally, the sustainability of research zeal.
2.It can be overcome by self-interest of reflecting and changing attitude towards teaching. As one must understand teaching is not just teaching but also learning.


Re: #week1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

Anastasiia Gubarenko
 

Hi, Richard! Hello, everyone!
Thank you so much for sharing your precious handbook and other materials. Much appreciated.

I really like these Exploratory Action Research steps as it reminds me of some Reflective journals that a teacher can keep on a daily basis, which can serve us as the so-called step-by-step analysis on teaching and performing lessons on our CPD way.

In my humble opinion, research is part of our development of both teachers and mentors. First, it comes from within, I call it an inner necessity and intention to become better and absorb knowledge :). Hence from my observation, I can state that many teachers feel lack of motivation due to many reasons and, let’s say, are tough sometimes to be motivated and ‘pushed’, likewise our students who demand constant sources of inspiration. That’s why I am sure we, as mentors, should always keep the ear to the ground, reflect and refresh mentees’ needs/journals from time to time. For example, I always (each month for sure) offer my students various challenges, journals, checklists to brainstorm if their goals have changed, to see if they’re into this or that thing in order my lessons would be really fruitful. 

Well, concerning some challenges that happen/might happen during mentoring.

  1. TIME: We don’t have problems with logistics as all of us work remotely, but to land on time or find one time-slot suitable to everyone can be hard.
  2. COMMUNICATION: nowadays it’s sometimes not easy to engage people into active participation (as I see from the experience of our school mentors). As an observer of that situation, I can state if somebody is tough, our mentors can’t influence or engage them at all.
  3. SHARING is caring: I do strongly believe that while sharing you exchange not just knowledge and experience but energy. It’s great when you can share some teaching cases and discuss your failures or successes with colleagues. As a rule, there are fewer people who can share anything, again, there are definite reasons, usually, they don’t want to spend time because they are very busy or because of anything else.
  4. FEEDBACK: we all want to get desirable constructive feedback that will underline or pinpoint our drawbacks, help us grow and make a self-correction. The problem is you must believe in your mentor, see their empathy and objective thinking towards you.

 

Who is a mentor for me?

Well, being a demanding person myself, I have lots of requirements for my mentor :).
This person should be experienced (I am sure years and expertise matter (though there are exceptions, of course).
A mentor is an inspirer. They motivate by their example, actions, deeds.

A mentor never stops learning. They are life-learners eager to know more and become better.

A mentor is non-judgemental and not competitive with you in a bad sense of this word. Mentors shouldn’t compete with you and be afraid that you might become better one day. They should be self-sufficient not to suppress you. They should be truly radiant.

 

Anyway, I’m sure all people and students are already our mentors to some extent because you learn something new from anyone daily.

Question: Richard, what’s more challenging in mentoring for you nowadays? How do you cope with it?

Thank you.

 

Warm wishes,
Anastasiia


Re: #week 1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

Elizabeth Bekes
 

Dear Zekeriya,

That sounds great. Are you thinking about presenting / reporting on your the experience? Sounds like a well thought out and solid programme.

Be well,

Elizabeth

On Wednesday, 15 January 2020, 07:11:47 GMT-5, Zekeriya <zkrydurmaz@...> wrote:


Dear Elizabeth,
Thank you for the detailed feedback. Actually we have launched our CPD unit and we have been observing and beeing observed by the CPD members as a peer couching program with pre-observation and post observation plan followed by reflection and feedback by the CPD member. CPD members are our experienced and expert members of our institution(our critical friends). So ıt is both a top-down and a bottom-up approach program. Ms Seden Tuyan call it "mild" CPD program.  

On Wed, Jan 15, 2020 at 3:04 PM Elizabeth Bekes via Groups.Io <ebekes=yahoo.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
Dear Zekeriya,

Interest in classroom research (lack of, rather) might be a serious challenge. As I suggested elsewhere, looking for the reasons in your own context could, in itself, become an excellent AR project. It would probably require the teachers themselves voicing the reasons for their disinterest, even apathy, concerning classroom research, which is the first step in trying to achieve change (act).

The fact that you ask them about this issue would show that YOU are interested in their situation and this could create some goodwill. Also, if you could perhaps set up peer observations: maybe the teacher teaching cannot see a problem in their classroom, but a colleague or critical friend might?

I have often read that, ideally, teachers would need to volunteer to do classroom research. Mindbogglingly bureaucratic, top down ministry campaigns could kill even the last sparkle of enthusiasm. However, the way the British Council set these up in India, Nepal, Chile and elsewhere shows that carefully designed projects can work (we have members here who have done these sessions and are the champions of this kind of research now). Would it be possible to set up a CPD group whose members would be inclined to, at least, try AR? I would make sure that it is exploratory in nature and doesn't not take over your life!

Good luck,

Elizabeth

On Wednesday, 15 January 2020, 02:21:59 GMT-5, Zekeriya <zkrydurmaz@...> wrote:


I do agree with most of the comments shared here and the ones stated in the "Challenges" file. 
For me, the most challenging point is teachers' beliefs. They may come up with the question "Is there really anything worth researching in my classroom?" It becomes hard to convince them that it is really worth it. 
And also, despite all efforts of initiative inquiry during providing feedback, the mentor faces some degree of resistance by the mentee.  

On Wed, Jan 15, 2020 at 2:27 AM Irene Varela <guildfordschoolmoodle@...> wrote:
I think that the most challenging thing in mentoring teachers is to make them understand the importance of research in the classroom both for the students and their own PD. Sometimes teachers are that much into their planning, correcting and organizing themselves that it can get pretty difficult to motivate them. 


--
Zekeriya D.


--
Zekeriya D.


Re: #Week1 ‘What are your experiences, hopes, expectations, plans, questions regarding mentoring teacher-research? #week1

Elizabeth Bekes
 

Hi, Ravinarayan,

I have worked under challenging circumstances in Ethiopia and the Amazonian jungle, but your situation of being expected to mentor 70 teachers would give me a heart attack because of the sheer numbers.

May I offer a couple of tips?

I am assuming that these 70 teachers will be coming from different primary schools. Perhaps you could set up groups at each school and identify either a co-mentor or a coordinator there?

If there are similar questions to be explored, would you be able to set up groups based on the topic involved so that they could do some experience sharing across schools? I don't know about connectivity in your context. Would it make more sense to have groups on a regional basis (meaning they could get together and you could see them in situ)?

Will you be getting time release for this massive amount of mentoring work? Could you get help from colleagues at you own institution? Would your institute be prepared to pay for an assistant researcher? Is your institute interested in publishing research? That could give you a little more leverage...

Good luck, you are a  brave person!

Elizabeth

On Wednesday, 15 January 2020, 02:18:44 GMT-5, Ravinarayan Chakrakodi <ravirie@...> wrote:


My expectation:
I'd like to learn more about analysing qualitative data in classroom research. 

Plans:
I am going to meet a large group of 70 primary school teachers who will undergo a one month training at the Institute where I work from 20th January 2020. I will be helping them with classroom-based research by initially asking them to identify the issues they'd like to explore, collect evidence, share initial findings after exploration, etc. 
Questions:
Is there an ideal number of teacher researchers who can be successfully mentored? How best can I mentor nearly 70 teacher researchers and keep them motivated until they complete one cycle of Action Research?


Re: #week 1 What is challenging in mentoring teachers to research their classrooms? How can these difficulties be overcome? Your replies, please! #week1

Zekeriya DURMAZ
 

Dear Elizabeth,
Thank you for the detailed feedback. Actually we have launched our CPD unit and we have been observing and beeing observed by the CPD members as a peer couching program with pre-observation and post observation plan followed by reflection and feedback by the CPD member. CPD members are our experienced and expert members of our institution(our critical friends). So ıt is both a top-down and a bottom-up approach program. Ms Seden Tuyan call it "mild" CPD program.  

On Wed, Jan 15, 2020 at 3:04 PM Elizabeth Bekes via Groups.Io <ebekes=yahoo.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
Dear Zekeriya,

Interest in classroom research (lack of, rather) might be a serious challenge. As I suggested elsewhere, looking for the reasons in your own context could, in itself, become an excellent AR project. It would probably require the teachers themselves voicing the reasons for their disinterest, even apathy, concerning classroom research, which is the first step in trying to achieve change (act).

The fact that you ask them about this issue would show that YOU are interested in their situation and this could create some goodwill. Also, if you could perhaps set up peer observations: maybe the teacher teaching cannot see a problem in their classroom, but a colleague or critical friend might?

I have often read that, ideally, teachers would need to volunteer to do classroom research. Mindbogglingly bureaucratic, top down ministry campaigns could kill even the last sparkle of enthusiasm. However, the way the British Council set these up in India, Nepal, Chile and elsewhere shows that carefully designed projects can work (we have members here who have done these sessions and are the champions of this kind of research now). Would it be possible to set up a CPD group whose members would be inclined to, at least, try AR? I would make sure that it is exploratory in nature and doesn't not take over your life!

Good luck,

Elizabeth

On Wednesday, 15 January 2020, 02:21:59 GMT-5, Zekeriya <zkrydurmaz@...> wrote:


I do agree with most of the comments shared here and the ones stated in the "Challenges" file. 
For me, the most challenging point is teachers' beliefs. They may come up with the question "Is there really anything worth researching in my classroom?" It becomes hard to convince them that it is really worth it. 
And also, despite all efforts of initiative inquiry during providing feedback, the mentor faces some degree of resistance by the mentee.  

On Wed, Jan 15, 2020 at 2:27 AM Irene Varela <guildfordschoolmoodle@...> wrote:
I think that the most challenging thing in mentoring teachers is to make them understand the importance of research in the classroom both for the students and their own PD. Sometimes teachers are that much into their planning, correcting and organizing themselves that it can get pretty difficult to motivate them. 


--
Zekeriya D.


--
Zekeriya D.

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